Discussion:
Let's hear it for the kids...
(too old to reply)
islander
2017-10-12 14:46:33 UTC
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One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.

https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-12 16:01:43 UTC
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Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
islander
2017-10-12 16:23:56 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.

I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
El Castor
2017-10-12 20:48:00 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
islander
2017-10-13 14:34:13 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/

[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.

We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.

As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-13 14:56:56 UTC
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Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
I'm 72 and my driving scares my son, but he's 55 and his
driving scares me. I'd welcome self-driving cars, as you
would. El Castor has also mentioned he'll welcome them.
Emily
2017-10-13 19:55:57 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
I'm 72 and my driving scares my son, but he's 55 and his
driving scares me. I'd welcome self-driving cars, as you
would. El Castor has also mentioned he'll welcome them.
I think they'd be a great idea for other people, freeing them play
with their phones or just be naturally inept, but I don't think I'd
ever be able to trust one for myself.
El Castor
2017-10-13 22:19:51 UTC
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Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
I'm 72 and my driving scares my son, but he's 55 and his
driving scares me. I'd welcome self-driving cars, as you
would. El Castor has also mentioned he'll welcome them.
I think they'd be a great idea for other people, freeing them play
with their phones or just be naturally inept, but I don't think I'd
ever be able to trust one for myself.
You unfortunately seem to be in the majority on that. Here's something
that might make you feel better.

rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-14 01:41:05 UTC
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On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:19:51 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
I'm 72 and my driving scares my son, but he's 55 and his
driving scares me. I'd welcome self-driving cars, as you
would. El Castor has also mentioned he'll welcome them.
I think they'd be a great idea for other people, freeing them play
with their phones or just be naturally inept, but I don't think I'd
ever be able to trust one for myself.
You unfortunately seem to be in the majority on that. Here's something
that might make you feel better.
http://youtu.be/DuIrjRAzNPQ
Pretty good. I don't think I've ever seen an auto accident
while I was driving, though I have seen a couple of Jim
Dandy's while I was walking.

I live near what seems to be a particularly perilous
intersection, where the traffic on my heavily-trafficked 18th
Street intersects the traffic coming down Eureka Street
after having crossed Market Street just one block earlier.
I often hear a crash and look out my front window to see
two heavily-damaged cars in the intersection. There's a
4-way stop sign but apparently it gets ignored sometimes.
Fortunately, nobody's been killed or very seriously injured
yet, that I know of.
El Castor
2017-10-14 08:04:37 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:19:51 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
I'm 72 and my driving scares my son, but he's 55 and his
driving scares me. I'd welcome self-driving cars, as you
would. El Castor has also mentioned he'll welcome them.
I think they'd be a great idea for other people, freeing them play
with their phones or just be naturally inept, but I don't think I'd
ever be able to trust one for myself.
You unfortunately seem to be in the majority on that. Here's something
that might make you feel better.
http://youtu.be/DuIrjRAzNPQ
Pretty good. I don't think I've ever seen an auto accident
while I was driving, though I have seen a couple of Jim
Dandy's while I was walking.
I live near what seems to be a particularly perilous
intersection, where the traffic on my heavily-trafficked 18th
Street intersects the traffic coming down Eureka Street
after having crossed Market Street just one block earlier.
I often hear a crash and look out my front window to see
two heavily-damaged cars in the intersection. There's a
4-way stop sign but apparently it gets ignored sometimes.
Fortunately, nobody's been killed or very seriously injured
yet, that I know of.
At one time I lived in an apartment on Stockton, above the Stockton
tunnel. There was an intersection that seemed designed to generate
accidents. Screech/Thump was such a familiar sound, I didn't bother
looking out the window.
islander
2017-10-14 01:31:52 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
I'm 72 and my driving scares my son, but he's 55 and his
driving scares me. I'd welcome self-driving cars, as you
would. El Castor has also mentioned he'll welcome them.
I think they'd be a great idea for other people, freeing them play
with their phones or just be naturally inept, but I don't think I'd
ever be able to trust one for myself.
I've mentioned here before that one of the challenges of self-driving
cars is to avoid the temptation to make them too capable. Since
reaction time is much less for automation than for humans, it is likely
to be technically possible for self-driving cars to follow the car ahead
much more closely than a human might be comfortable with. Lane changing
could also happen more abruptly. Altogether, being a passenger in a
self-driving car might be pretty scary, even if it were completely safe
from a technical point of view.

I once thought that getting a ride in an F-111 aircraft would be quite
an exciting ride. Think about sitting side-by-side with the pilot where
you would have a clear view of what is ahead while flying at tree level
with terrain following capability at supersonic speed. What a ride!
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-14 01:41:05 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
I'm 72 and my driving scares my son, but he's 55 and his
driving scares me. I'd welcome self-driving cars, as you
would. El Castor has also mentioned he'll welcome them.
I think they'd be a great idea for other people, freeing them play
with their phones or just be naturally inept, but I don't think I'd
ever be able to trust one for myself.
I guess I must have some faith in technology, since I'm not
scared of self-driving cars. I don't think I'd buy one from the
very first batch though. I'm 72 anyway, and have had my
current car since I inherited it from my mom in 2003, and
she had it a few years before that, so I may never buy a car
again. I think I've put fewer than a thousand miles a year
on my car since I got it.
El Castor
2017-10-13 22:05:11 UTC
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Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-14 01:41:05 UTC
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Raw Message
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
El Castor
2017-10-14 08:16:23 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
islander
2017-10-16 00:39:17 UTC
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Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-16 06:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
The reason I tip at all is to give relatively low-wage
workers a little extra money. Since that b*****d
Reagan, of course, low-wage people get tipped on
what they're "presumed" to get tipped. That seemed
to me at the time and still does seem to me, a really
lousy thing for a super-rich guy like Reagan to do to
people who make so much less than himself.
Reagan was a Republican though, so what would
one expect? I do tip enough, I hope, that my tip will
exceed the amount people will be "presumed" to be
tipped and therefore be taxed on. For that same
reason, I always tip in cash, rather than putting the
tip on my credit card along with the service rendered,
if I pay by credit card.
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-16 06:16:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
The reason I tip at all is to give relatively low-wage
workers a little extra money. Since that b*****d
Reagan, of course, low-wage people get tipped on
what they're "presumed" to get tipped.
Correction: get "taxed" on what they're presumed
to get tipped.
Post by rumpelstiltskin
That seemed
to me at the time and still does seem to me, a really
lousy thing for a super-rich guy like Reagan to do to
people who make so much less than himself.
Reagan was a Republican though, so what would
one expect? I do tip enough, I hope, that my tip will
exceed the amount people will be "presumed" to be
tipped and therefore be taxed on. For that same
reason, I always tip in cash, rather than putting the
tip on my credit card along with the service rendered,
if I pay by credit card.
islander
2017-10-16 18:00:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
The reason I tip at all is to give relatively low-wage
workers a little extra money. Since that b*****d
Reagan, of course, low-wage people get tipped on
what they're "presumed" to get tipped.
Correction: get "taxed" on what they're presumed
to get tipped.
Post by rumpelstiltskin
That seemed
to me at the time and still does seem to me, a really
lousy thing for a super-rich guy like Reagan to do to
people who make so much less than himself.
Reagan was a Republican though, so what would
one expect? I do tip enough, I hope, that my tip will
exceed the amount people will be "presumed" to be
tipped and therefore be taxed on. For that same
reason, I always tip in cash, rather than putting the
tip on my credit card along with the service rendered,
if I pay by credit card.
I always tip 20% for the same reason as you. Even at that, it is really
hard for a person working in food service to make much money with a base
salary of $2.13 per hour and a dependency on their boss for what is
unpredictable work hours. It is really an abusive business.
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-17 01:31:00 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
The reason I tip at all is to give relatively low-wage
workers a little extra money. Since that b*****d
Reagan, of course, low-wage people get tipped on
what they're "presumed" to get tipped.
Correction: get "taxed" on what they're presumed
to get tipped.
Post by rumpelstiltskin
That seemed
to me at the time and still does seem to me, a really
lousy thing for a super-rich guy like Reagan to do to
people who make so much less than himself.
Reagan was a Republican though, so what would
one expect? I do tip enough, I hope, that my tip will
exceed the amount people will be "presumed" to be
tipped and therefore be taxed on. For that same
reason, I always tip in cash, rather than putting the
tip on my credit card along with the service rendered,
if I pay by credit card.
I always tip 20% for the same reason as you. Even at that, it is really
hard for a person working in food service to make much money with a base
salary of $2.13 per hour and a dependency on their boss for what is
unpredictable work hours. It is really an abusive business.
It's not quite that bad in California, I think. Most of
the waitpersons I see seem OK with their jobs, though
one does of course hear stories about employers
abusing their workers because they can, and no doubt
many of those stories are true. Our minimum wage at the
moment is $11/hour, and there's a push for $15/hour.
islander
2017-10-17 15:18:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
The reason I tip at all is to give relatively low-wage
workers a little extra money. Since that b*****d
Reagan, of course, low-wage people get tipped on
what they're "presumed" to get tipped.
Correction: get "taxed" on what they're presumed
to get tipped.
Post by rumpelstiltskin
That seemed
to me at the time and still does seem to me, a really
lousy thing for a super-rich guy like Reagan to do to
people who make so much less than himself.
Reagan was a Republican though, so what would
one expect? I do tip enough, I hope, that my tip will
exceed the amount people will be "presumed" to be
tipped and therefore be taxed on. For that same
reason, I always tip in cash, rather than putting the
tip on my credit card along with the service rendered,
if I pay by credit card.
I always tip 20% for the same reason as you. Even at that, it is really
hard for a person working in food service to make much money with a base
salary of $2.13 per hour and a dependency on their boss for what is
unpredictable work hours. It is really an abusive business.
It's not quite that bad in California, I think. Most of
the waitpersons I see seem OK with their jobs, though
one does of course hear stories about employers
abusing their workers because they can, and no doubt
many of those stories are true. Our minimum wage at the
moment is $11/hour, and there's a push for $15/hour.
Yes, but food service personnel are exempt from the minimum wage.
Supposedly employers are required to make up the difference if they
don't get enough in tips, but that is open to abuse in so many ways.
El Castor
2017-10-16 23:47:17 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
You only tip people -- perhaps because a machine can't be offended, so
I am sure you would not tip a self driving cab -- I know I wouldn't.
In restaurants I tip 20%. That seems to be the norm these days.
islander
2017-10-17 00:58:24 UTC
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Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
You only tip people -- perhaps because a machine can't be offended, so
I am sure you would not tip a self driving cab -- I know I wouldn't.
In restaurants I tip 20%. That seems to be the norm these days.
Hmmm. If the purpose of tipping is to reward good service, why would it
be different for a machine? With AI based equipment, wouldn't that
serve to improve service? In fact, AI knowledge would probably be
shared across a fleet of self driving cabs. Word would get around
quickly if you didn't tip. Just saying...

Or perhaps we should just pay service personnel a decent wage!
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-17 05:22:05 UTC
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<snip>
Post by islander
Hmmm. If the purpose of tipping is to reward good service, why would it
be different for a machine? With AI based equipment, wouldn't that
serve to improve service? In fact, AI knowledge would probably be
shared across a fleet of self driving cabs. Word would get around
quickly if you didn't tip. Just saying...
Bizarro world again.
Post by islander
Or perhaps we should just pay service personnel a decent wage!
That would work too, except that it's never happened and
perhaps never will.
El Castor
2017-10-17 06:26:45 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
<snip>
Post by islander
Hmmm. If the purpose of tipping is to reward good service, why would it
be different for a machine? With AI based equipment, wouldn't that
serve to improve service? In fact, AI knowledge would probably be
shared across a fleet of self driving cabs. Word would get around
quickly if you didn't tip. Just saying...
Bizarro world again.
Post by islander
Or perhaps we should just pay service personnel a decent wage!
That would work too, except that it's never happened and
perhaps never will.
When was the last time you tipped a nurse or the Mexicans who washed
your car?
rumpelstiltskin
2017-10-17 15:11:26 UTC
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On Mon, 16 Oct 2017 23:26:45 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
<snip>
Post by islander
Hmmm. If the purpose of tipping is to reward good service, why would it
be different for a machine? With AI based equipment, wouldn't that
serve to improve service? In fact, AI knowledge would probably be
shared across a fleet of self driving cabs. Word would get around
quickly if you didn't tip. Just saying...
Bizarro world again.
Post by islander
Or perhaps we should just pay service personnel a decent wage!
That would work too, except that it's never happened and
perhaps never will.
When was the last time you tipped a nurse or the Mexicans who washed
your car?
Croak, croak, croak. Caw, caw, caw.
El Castor
2017-10-17 06:23:51 UTC
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Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:05:11 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
One of the advantages of being in a university is the great kids that
you get to meet and work with. Here is Astro Teller, one of my students
of whom I am very proud.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/astro-teller-captain-of-moonshots-at-x
Sounds like a very astute guy!
He was, and probably still is, a bit of a character. We had some great
conversations about his grandfather, Edward Teller.
I cannot take any credit for his success, but I really miss working with
these bright kids!
Very interesting guy. AI is a fascinating subject. Personally, I can't
wait for the self driving car. I don't suffer from this, but I see
many people my age, or a bit older, getting afraid to drive. I'm not a
Cadillac buyer (yuck), but they have begun shipping a model with the
ability to drive hands free on the freeway. In addition to automated
braking, and related safety tech, Honda offers traffic sign
recognition. Won't be long.
I participated in the development of a transportation program for
seniors and the disabled on the island last year. One of the articles
that I ran across, while dated, is revealing.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447231/
[citing this article in our business plan] The importance of the
question of when to stop driving is receiving more attention from the
public health community as an increasing number of baby boomers reach
that decision. One of the more comprehensive articles, although slightly
dated, provides useful statistics. In particular, this study of US
drivers concludes that drivers aged 70 to 74 had a driving life
expectancy of approximately 11 years, men driving longer than women.
While 88% of men in their early 70s continue to drive, this declines
rapidly to 55% of those aged 85 or older. For women, 70% continue to
drive in their early 70s, declining to 22% for those aged 85 and above.
Overall, 82% of men over 70 continue to drive and 55% of women.
We concluded that transportation is the major factor in the ability of
seniors to continue to live independently in their own homes, especially
in a rural community like ours. We also concluded the obvious that
there were a lot of drivers still on the road who should have hung up
their keys.
As an aside, the guy who led this project is a big fan of self-driving
cars and expects them to be a viable solution for us within 10 years.
He contends that self-driving cars should be easier to design for rural
roads. If my own experience is any indication, he may be right. I find
it much more difficult to drive on the mainland.
The majority of the people who have died in the last couple of days in
the fires north of here have been over 60. Probably in most cases a
lack of mobility contributed to their death. A car that can be driven
without a licensed driver behind the wheel will make a huge difference
for a lot of people. I would also guess that in big cities individual
car ownership will decline to be replaced by self driving cabs and
Ubers, or group ownership of pool cars that can be summoned with a
smart phone. That of course assumes we are not all nuked by North
Korea or Yellowstone doesn't blow up and submerge us in ash. (-8
I hate cabs, mostly because I'm a cheapskate.
I know what you mean, and when I do use one I'm never sure how much to
tip.
Question: Would one be expected to tip a self-driving taxi? If not,
why not? Personally, one of the reasons that I enjoyed visiting Tokyo
is that there is no tipping and the service was wonderful!
You only tip people -- perhaps because a machine can't be offended, so
I am sure you would not tip a self driving cab -- I know I wouldn't.
In restaurants I tip 20%. That seems to be the norm these days.
Hmmm. If the purpose of tipping is to reward good service, why would it
be different for a machine? With AI based equipment, wouldn't that
serve to improve service? In fact, AI knowledge would probably be
shared across a fleet of self driving cabs. Word would get around
quickly if you didn't tip. Just saying...
Or perhaps we should just pay service personnel a decent wage!
I don't have a problem with that, but tipping is so ingrained I
suspect it would be very difficult to accomplish.
d***@gmail.com
2017-10-12 23:29:06 UTC
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You had quite a student, Islander, and he had quite a grandfather.

Eugene FitzAubrey
islander
2017-10-13 14:41:51 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
You had quite a student, Islander, and he had quite a grandfather.
Eugene FitzAubrey
Well, Edward Teller supposedly had Reagan's ear in convincing him to
launch Star Wars. I didn't realize it until later, but this was the
most clever bluff of the Cold War. The Soviet Union had an inflated
view of our technological ability and, faced with their economic
difficulties, didn't think that they could afford to compete. In
reality, Star Wars was essentially a consolidation of existing programs
with very little new money.

I give Reagan little credit for anything, but this was a significant
factor in ending the Cold War, IMV.
d***@gmail.com
2017-10-14 02:09:04 UTC
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I attended some of Edward Teller's lectures at LLNL and was irritated (make that jealous of) his assumed expertise in anything and everything. If he didn't advocate Star Wars (the Strategic Defense Initiative) I'd be surprised.
I
For awhile I was assigned to the (brutal) Laser Isotope Separation program. One day my hung ho, super loyal boss was removed from his position for no apparent reason (par for the course). I was surprised when I heard he had transferred to the Star Wars project, which was super secret. An engineer and I used to take walks during lunch, and one day we noticed the Star Wars building and tried to go inside. We couldn't find the entrance. We went all the way around the building looking, but we couldn't find an entrance. It was mystifying -- and embarrassing.

The Lab had a heliport where bigwigs landed, and one day President George Bush Sr. landed for a ceremony in the auditorium. I wasn't invited ☺, but I heard later that Bush had been awarded a model component of the system. I happened to be walking outside when I began hearing a mechanical voice saying "Thank you, thank you, thank you" over and over. What in hell could that be??? Then Bush passed by returning to the heliport. He was in a presidential limo speaking into a microphone and his amplified voice was coming from a loudspeaker on fhe roof of the limo. I was stunned.

Eugene FitzAubrey
b***@gmail.com
2017-10-14 07:32:59 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
I attended some of Edward Teller's lectures at LLNL and was irritated (make that jealous of) his assumed expertise in anything and everything. If he didn't advocate Star Wars (the Strategic Defense Initiative) I'd be surprised.
Speaking of Teller (the Elder),I was not particularly fond of him
because of his involvement in the destruction of Oppenheimer who I
often wished I could be as intelligent. <sigh>

Be that as it may, these fellows were awesome even with their flaws.
It would have been thrilling to have been in their company.
d***@gmail.com
2017-10-14 13:34:34 UTC
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Bfla, I must admit that I always admired Teller. I think he was a straight shooter and if he thought Oppenheimer was a security risk he would say so.

Eugene FitzAubrey
b***@gmail.com
2017-10-14 19:28:25 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
Bfla, I must admit that I always admired Teller. I think he was a straight shooter and if he thought Oppenheimer was a security risk he would say so.
You could be correct about the "straight shooter" Teller. I don't
know but my hunch is that there was bad feelings on Teller's part
because Oppie was against further development of nuclear weapons
especially the H-bomb. Teller, as far as I know, was very competitive
and, as you mentioned, very sure of his correctness. Some would call
it hubris but, again, Teller was a genius, no question about it.

I think Oppie was more of a humanist than was Teller but my ignorance
may be showing.
d***@gmail.com
2017-10-14 20:21:11 UTC
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Bfla, I'm sure you're right about Oppenheimer being more of a humanist than Dr. Strangelove. ☺

Eugene FitzAubrey
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