Discussion:
Dating & Marriage: Do People Prefer Same-Race Romantic Relationships?
Add Reply
mg
2018-04-06 19:57:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating

Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2

1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University

Abstract

What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf




---------------------------
I have been struck again
and again by how important
measurement is to improving
the human condition.
-- Bill Gates
El Castor
2018-04-06 20:20:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I don't find pure Black women at all physically attractive, so I
googled African women and came up with a link to a YouTube video of
the 10 most attractive African women. First up is a woman from Ghana
-- beautiful, but probably at least half White.


I don't find most Asian women particularly attractive, except for Lucy
Liu, of course. But, the combination of Asian and Caucasian produces
some real beauties. Some Hispanic women are gorgeous.

Political? Absolutely not! Regardless of what Stanford thinks, in my
case it is Genetic -- period.
mg
2018-04-06 21:56:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 06 Apr 2018 13:20:13 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I don't find pure Black women at all physically attractive, so I
googled African women and came up with a link to a YouTube video of
the 10 most attractive African women. First up is a woman from Ghana
-- beautiful, but probably at least half White.
http://youtu.be/o1IrZ9VE6mY
I don't find most Asian women particularly attractive, except for Lucy
Liu, of course. But, the combination of Asian and Caucasian produces
some real beauties. Some Hispanic women are gorgeous.
Political? Absolutely not! Regardless of what Stanford thinks, in my
case it is Genetic -- period.
I've noticed over the years that mixed-race women, black/white,
Asian/white, Hawaiin/white, etc. can be extremely beautiful. Years
ago, as I recall, MSNBC had two or three of them.

I would venture to say, though, that on average, white men find
single-race blacks and Asians less unattractive. Some Asians women
have nose and eye surgery to increase their attractiveness, I think.
In the case, of blacks, I don't think there are any easy surgical
solutions, though.

I think Mexican and black women also have an unusual body shape, by
the way. There's something funny about the way their butts stick out,
or something. :-)



--------------------------
I'm sorry that the Control
Freak in you activates
the Psycho Bitch in me.
Josh Rosenbluth
2018-04-06 21:45:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
mg
2018-04-06 22:04:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
One can speculate about such things til the cows come home, but this
is obviously a scholarly, scientific article.



----------------------------------------------
I often say that when you can measure what you
are speaking about, and express it in numbers,
you know something about it; but when you
cannot measure it, when you cannot express it
in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and
unsatisfactory kind."
--Lord Kelvin (1824-1907) from lecture to the
Institute of Civil Engineers, 3 May 1883
Josh Rosenbluth
2018-04-06 22:08:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
One can speculate about such things til the cows come home, but this
is obviously a scholarly, scientific article.
The article merely chronicled facts. Did you post article merely to
acknowledge those facts, or was it in a context of making some point?
mg
2018-04-06 22:31:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
One can speculate about such things til the cows come home, but this
is obviously a scholarly, scientific article.
The article merely chronicled facts.
In general, I think scholarly/scientific articles present both facts
and conclusions, rather than simply chronicle facts, and I don't think
this one is an exception.
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Did you post article merely to
acknowledge those facts, or was it in a context of making some point?
Josh Rosenbluth
2018-04-06 22:54:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
One can speculate about such things til the cows come home, but this
is obviously a scholarly, scientific article.
The article merely chronicled facts.
In general, I think scholarly/scientific articles present both facts
and conclusions, rather than simply chronicle facts, and I don't think
this one is an exception.
What conclusion in this paper led you to post the article?
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Did you post article merely to
acknowledge those facts, or was it in a context of making some point?
El Castor
2018-04-07 08:17:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
One can speculate about such things til the cows come home, but this
is obviously a scholarly, scientific article.
The article merely chronicled facts.
In general, I think scholarly/scientific articles present both facts
and conclusions, rather than simply chronicle facts, and I don't think
this one is an exception.
And sometimes scholars set out to arrive at a pre-ordained conclusion.
mg
2018-04-08 07:53:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 07 Apr 2018 01:17:43 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
One can speculate about such things til the cows come home, but this
is obviously a scholarly, scientific article.
The article merely chronicled facts.
In general, I think scholarly/scientific articles present both facts
and conclusions, rather than simply chronicle facts, and I don't think
this one is an exception.
And sometimes scholars set out to arrive at a pre-ordained conclusion.
I won't argue with that especially if political correctness is
involved and especially if the scholars are worried about their jobs.

However, leftwingers now have a new trick that they use against
rightwingers. The way the trick works is that whenever a rightwinger
provides an academic reference, or a reference from a scientific
journal, the leftwinger pulls a speculative response out of his ass.
Here's an example:

RIGHTWINGER: I've just spent 6 months digging up 10,784 academic and
scientific-journal references indicating that the average Lilliputian
is cross eyed.

LEFTWINGER: That doesn't prove anything. Personally, I think that's
caused by masterbating with the wrong hand.

:-)

b***@gmail.com
2018-04-07 00:38:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
Actually, I would prefer a 110 pound pretty black woman to a 350 pound ugly fat white woman.
Gary
2018-04-07 12:07:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately. If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
Actually, I would prefer a 110 pound pretty black woman to a 350 pound ugly fat white woman.
I could (and have) managed quite well -- without either.
islander
2018-04-07 00:52:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Josh Rosenbluth
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
http://web.stanford.edu/~neilm/Political%20Ideology%20and%20Racial%20Preferences%20in%20Online%20Dating.pdf
I believe this is a symptom of our continued racial strife, once again
brought about by growing up separately.  If we ever grow up together, I
would expect such preferences to go away.
Remember the movie Sayonara? At the time ('50s), for a white American
to fall in love with an Asian was not only frowned upon, but was illegal
in many states. This was a big deal for Americans stationed in Japan
during the Korean War. Now, it wouldn't raise an eyebrow.

The anti-miscegenation laws were were not declared unconstitutional
until 1967. Interracial marriages have increased ever since.

Now, PEW reports that 17% of marriages are interracial.
http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2017/05/18/intermarriage-in-the-u-s-50-years-after-loving-v-virginia/

People who oppose a relative marrying a black person has plummeted from
63% in 1990 to 14% in 2016.

Encouraging signs!
Gary
2018-04-07 12:07:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mg
"Political Ideology and Racial Preferences
in Online Dating
Ashton Anderson Sharad Goel Gregory Huber Neil Malhotra, and Duncan J.
Watts2
1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University
2Microsoft Research
3Department of Political Science, Yale University
4Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Abstract
What explains the relative persistence of same-race romantic
relationships? One possible explanation is structural—this phenomenon
could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified
along racial lines—while another attributes these patterns to
individual-level preferences. We present novel evidence from an online
dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United
States about the frequency with which individuals both express a
preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race
partners. Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important
correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States,
and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and
Blacks and Whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a
preference for same-race partners. Further, conservatives are not
simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with
regard to race. Do these stated preferences predict real behaviors? In
general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a
behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern
persists across ideological groups. At the same time, both men and
women of all political persuasions act as if they prefer same-race
relationships even when they claim not to. As a result, the gap
between conservatives and liberals in revealed same-race preferences,
while still substantial, is not as pronounced as their stated
attitudes would suggest. We conclude by discussing some implications
of our findings for the broader issues of racial homogamy and
segregation.
I'm not well read on this subject, but let me offer my opinion. I
think most people want their children and grandchildren to physically
resemble them and their parents. The only way this happens is through
same race parentage. Let's look back to the South 200 years ago.
The plantation master could mate with his female slaves. In which
case - his child would be a mulatto. And he did ! But -- he never
claimed that child. And this habit continued even after slavery was
abolished. But the white man still would not claim his offspring.
Not until the mid 20th century. At which time -- mixed couples began
to marry.

I would suggest if both a black and white person did not want children
-- and were going to use strict birth control -- they would be more
likely to come together as a couple.
Loading...