Discussion:
Florida's Government Built A Train - And It Didn't Go Well
(too old to reply)
me
2017-03-05 17:48:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Thanks to the grand vision of politicians, and the financial incentives created by the Federal government, Floridians have now spent hundreds of millions on a train that loses money charging customers to ride it. In the future, as government incentives expire, SunRail will face the issue of either raising ticket prices, likely further decreasing its already underwhelming demand, which will likely decrease the ad revenue the project was projected to be dependent on. The other response, perhaps more likely, is to simply pass the costs on to the millions of Floridians who have rejected the project by refusing to ride it.

Perhaps there’s a reason Walt Disney, who himself loved trains, decided to build an amusement park in Orlando rather than commuter rail.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-03-04/floridas-government-built-train-and-it-didnt-go-well
El Castor
2017-03-06 20:42:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by me
Thanks to the grand vision of politicians, and the financial incentives created by the Federal government, Floridians have now spent hundreds of millions on a train that loses money charging customers to ride it. In the future, as government incentives expire, SunRail will face the issue of either raising ticket prices, likely further decreasing its already underwhelming demand, which will likely decrease the ad revenue the project was projected to be dependent on. The other response, perhaps more likely, is to simply pass the costs on to the millions of Floridians who have rejected the project by refusing to ride it.
Perhaps there’s a reason Walt Disney, who himself loved trains, decided to build an amusement park in Orlando rather than commuter rail.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-03-04/floridas-government-built-train-and-it-didnt-go-well
California has a couple of rail project underway at a cost of
billions. The left leaning politicians behind these projects have
promised the voters that these abortions will pay for themselves, but
here is what we all know will happen. Subsidies will be needed at
first to get the ridership up. When the damn things still don't pay
for themselves, subsidies will have to be continued just a little
while longer -- and longer -- and longer ...
wolfbat359
2017-03-07 00:57:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by El Castor
Post by me
Thanks to the grand vision of politicians, and the financial incentives created by the Federal government, Floridians have now spent hundreds of millions on a train that loses money charging customers to ride it. In the future, as government incentives expire, SunRail will face the issue of either raising ticket prices, likely further decreasing its already underwhelming demand, which will likely decrease the ad revenue the project was projected to be dependent on. The other response, perhaps more likely, is to simply pass the costs on to the millions of Floridians who have rejected the project by refusing to ride it.
Perhaps there’s a reason Walt Disney, who himself loved trains, decided to build an amusement park in Orlando rather than commuter rail.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-03-04/floridas-government-built-train-and-it-didnt-go-well
California has a couple of rail project underway at a cost of
billions. The left leaning politicians behind these projects have
promised the voters that these abortions will pay for themselves, but
here is what we all know will happen. Subsidies will be needed at
first to get the ridership up. When the damn things still don't pay
for themselves, subsidies will have to be continued just a little
while longer -- and longer -- and longer ...
They let maintenance go also!
rumpelstiltskin
2017-03-07 01:17:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 16:57:35 -0800 (PST), wolfbat359
Post by wolfbat359
Post by El Castor
Post by me
Thanks to the grand vision of politicians, and the financial incentives created by the Federal government, Floridians have now spent hundreds of millions on a train that loses money charging customers to ride it. In the future, as government incentives expire, SunRail will face the issue of either raising ticket prices, likely further decreasing its already underwhelming demand, which will likely decrease the ad revenue the project was projected to be dependent on. The other response, perhaps more likely, is to simply pass the costs on to the millions of Floridians who have rejected the project by refusing to ride it.
Perhaps there’s a reason Walt Disney, who himself loved trains, decided to build an amusement park in Orlando rather than commuter rail.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-03-04/floridas-government-built-train-and-it-didnt-go-well
California has a couple of rail project underway at a cost of
billions. The left leaning politicians behind these projects have
promised the voters that these abortions will pay for themselves, but
here is what we all know will happen. Subsidies will be needed at
first to get the ridership up. When the damn things still don't pay
for themselves, subsidies will have to be continued just a little
while longer -- and longer -- and longer ...
They let maintenance go also!
I get to ride San Francisco's busses, streetcars, and subway
(not BART) for free because I'm a pitiful "senior". When my
son was here though, it cost him $2.50 for a ticket that's good
for 90 minutes. That, IMO, is "too much". One gets a ticket
that's only good for 90 minutes if one starts on the subway,
because that ticket is issued by a machine. On the busses
though, the ticket is usually good for longer - often for a lot
longer, because the bus drivers have a lot of other things to
deal with besides tearing off a ticket for the exact 90 minute
duration, so they usually tear off a batch at a time I'd ride
the busses a lot less than I do if I couldn't ride them for free.
Today I went to Kaiser for a blood test. I took the bus,
because it doesn't take much, if any, longer than the car. If
I had to pay $2.50 for a ticket, or even $5 if the time ran out
on the first ticket before I caught a return bus, I'd definitely
have driven instead.
wolfbat359
2017-03-07 05:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 16:57:35 -0800 (PST), wolfbat359
Post by wolfbat359
Post by El Castor
Post by me
Thanks to the grand vision of politicians, and the financial incentives created by the Federal government, Floridians have now spent hundreds of millions on a train that loses money charging customers to ride it. In the future, as government incentives expire, SunRail will face the issue of either raising ticket prices, likely further decreasing its already underwhelming demand, which will likely decrease the ad revenue the project was projected to be dependent on. The other response, perhaps more likely, is to simply pass the costs on to the millions of Floridians who have rejected the project by refusing to ride it.
Perhaps there’s a reason Walt Disney, who himself loved trains, decided to build an amusement park in Orlando rather than commuter rail.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-03-04/floridas-government-built-train-and-it-didnt-go-well
California has a couple of rail project underway at a cost of
billions. The left leaning politicians behind these projects have
promised the voters that these abortions will pay for themselves, but
here is what we all know will happen. Subsidies will be needed at
first to get the ridership up. When the damn things still don't pay
for themselves, subsidies will have to be continued just a little
while longer -- and longer -- and longer ...
They let maintenance go also!
I get to ride San Francisco's busses, streetcars, and subway
(not BART) for free because I'm a pitiful "senior". When my
son was here though, it cost him $2.50 for a ticket that's good
for 90 minutes. That, IMO, is "too much". One gets a ticket
that's only good for 90 minutes if one starts on the subway,
because that ticket is issued by a machine. On the busses
though, the ticket is usually good for longer - often for a lot
longer, because the bus drivers have a lot of other things to
deal with besides tearing off a ticket for the exact 90 minute
duration, so they usually tear off a batch at a time I'd ride
the busses a lot less than I do if I couldn't ride them for free.
Today I went to Kaiser for a blood test. I took the bus,
because it doesn't take much, if any, longer than the car. If
I had to pay $2.50 for a ticket, or even $5 if the time ran out
on the first ticket before I caught a return bus, I'd definitely
have driven instead.
In Denver, you can get a ticket to ride in the Denver area for $5.20. That lasts all day and is good for all day in the Denver area on Buses or Light rail. If you want to go to the airport it will cost you more! Course, the light rail to the airport is constantly breaking down!
rumpelstiltskin
2017-03-07 16:35:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 21:31:00 -0800 (PST), wolfbat359
<snip>
Post by wolfbat359
Post by rumpelstiltskin
I get to ride San Francisco's busses, streetcars, and subway
(not BART) for free because I'm a pitiful "senior". When my
son was here though, it cost him $2.50 for a ticket that's good
for 90 minutes. That, IMO, is "too much". One gets a ticket
that's only good for 90 minutes if one starts on the subway,
because that ticket is issued by a machine. On the busses
though, the ticket is usually good for longer - often for a lot
longer, because the bus drivers have a lot of other things to
deal with besides tearing off a ticket for the exact 90 minute
duration, so they usually tear off a batch at a time I'd ride
the busses a lot less than I do if I couldn't ride them for free.
Today I went to Kaiser for a blood test. I took the bus,
because it doesn't take much, if any, longer than the car. If
I had to pay $2.50 for a ticket, or even $5 if the time ran out
on the first ticket before I caught a return bus, I'd definitely
have driven instead.
In Denver, you can get a ticket to ride in the Denver area for $5.20. That lasts all day and is good for all day in the Denver area on Buses or Light rail. If you want to go to the airport it will cost you more! Course, the light rail to the airport is constantly breaking down!
That's a better deal than we have in San Francisco,
considering that if you take public transit one way you're
probably going to take it back too, and maybe more than
one trip per day. Although, in San Francisco, if you start
by taking a bus or streetcar, there's a fair chance that the
receipt you get will be good for four or six hours instead
of 90 minutes, and that's in any direction including the
return trip. The transfer is good on the subway too. If
you're a real skinflint (such as myself, before I got to ride
free all the time), You can pay on a streetcar to get the
receipt, then just ride one stop or even get off the
streetcar right away (from the back door, just so as not
to be too obvious), then go the subway and use the
receipt repeatedly starting with the subway for however
long the receipt is good.

Our BART doesn't break down unreasonably often, but
you can never depend, in San Francisco, on the escalators
or elevators from street level to the subway actually
working. I read somewhere, perhaps here, that someone
visiting Tokyo mentioned he had never once there run
into an escalator that was not working, but in San
Francisco, the odds seem to be about 10% or 20% that a
given escalator or elevator to the subway will not be
working at any given time. When one breaks down, it
can be weeks before it's fixed. The escalator from street
level to the toll booth at the southwest corner of Castro
and Market was out of action for about six months last
year while it was being renovated. Pretty coloured dots
of light were added along the side of the escalator in the
process. When it finally re-opened, within a couple of
months it was out of action again, and stayed out of
action for a week or two until it was fixed. The pretty
coloured dots of light were still working though.

I have a car, but I mostly use it just for groceries,
since the city Solons decided that a Trader Joe's or
Costco was not "upscale" enough for my
neighborhood. There's a supermarket less than a
block from my flat, but though it's changed hands
several times it's always been too expensive for me
to want to buy anything at it other than perhaps an
onion occasionally. The parking garage for it is
rather small though, so if it were cheap enough to
draw a crowd from elsewhere, the parking in my
neighborhood would be even worse than it already
is, though of course if the supermarket were more
appealing I wouldn't have any need of a car.

Definitions:
upscale - expensive
affordable - expensive
appropriate - expensive

Loading...