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US consumers lose privacy protections for their web browsing history
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arthur wouk
2017-03-29 05:10:34 UTC
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https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data


Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers

Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
--
"Religion is excellent stuff for keeping common people quiet."
~ Napoleon Bonaparte
to email me, delete blackhole from my return address
Gary
2017-03-29 12:22:40 UTC
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Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
I figure they've been doing that for years. Maybe indirectly.
rumpelstiltskin
2017-03-29 12:25:04 UTC
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Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
It's always safe to assume that whatever you do, the
government knows about it.
Emily
2017-03-29 13:48:22 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
It's always safe to assume that whatever you do, the
government knows about it.
They're welcome to track my browsing history but I don't want them
reading, and certainly not sharing, my e-mail.

A couple of days ago, it was surprisingly warm here and I thought I'd
check and see if the next day was forecast to be similar. Then I
thought about Yahoo. They have a weather page. So I fired it up --
for the first time since early February, and found that I had about a
thousand (I'm not exaggerating) e-mails. They were all deleted as
rapidly as possible. The government is welcome to read my Yahoo
e-mail since none of it matters at all. That's the address I give
when I have to give an e-mail address but have no intention of reading
anything they might ever send me.
DGW
2017-03-29 14:12:45 UTC
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Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
Nothing to hide here. But it's still kind of insulting. First key on
the keyboard to be all worn out is Del.
rumpelstiltskin
2017-03-29 16:07:23 UTC
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Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
It's always safe to assume that whatever you do, the
government knows about it.
They're welcome to track my browsing history but I don't want them
reading, and certainly not sharing, my e-mail.
I'd assume they're reading your email if they feel like it.
Post by Emily
A couple of days ago, it was surprisingly warm here and I thought I'd
check and see if the next day was forecast to be similar. Then I
thought about Yahoo. They have a weather page. So I fired it up --
for the first time since early February, and found that I had about a
thousand (I'm not exaggerating) e-mails. They were all deleted as
rapidly as possible. The government is welcome to read my Yahoo
e-mail since none of it matters at all. That's the address I give
when I have to give an e-mail address but have no intention of reading
anything they might ever send me.
I have two Thunderbird (Firefox) addresses that I use
for mail. I use Forte Agent for the newsgroup. While I
was trying to stop Forte Agent from making me have to
exit and reënter the program between every time I told
it to load new posts or send posts, I screwed up my
junk email address somehow, so that now although I
can receive and read emails from that address, I can't
send anything from it. The outgoing SMTP (or
whatever it is) is missing, and I haven't figured out
any way to fix it or to enter anything manually in that
field. The only things in that address that I'd want to
answer are messages from my two online "checking"
accounts, from which I don't want to write checks and
have declined the checkbook: I'm only using them
because they pay more than 1% interest. I had to
communicate with one of the banks. so I asked them
to change their address to my address that still
works, which used to be only for communicating with
non-business humans. I don't get too many emails
from my online banks so I guess I can tolerate
having them in the human email address.

I have extensive filters on my email accounts, and
anything annoying just goes straight into "trash"
automatically as long as I've set up a filter for it. My
human address only has a handful of robo-junk mail,
but my other account has a couple of hundred emails
in the trash folder at the moment. Every once in a
while I zap the messages in the trash folders.
islander
2017-04-20 00:38:30 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
It's always safe to assume that whatever you do, the
government knows about it.
They're welcome to track my browsing history but I don't want them
reading, and certainly not sharing, my e-mail.
I'd assume they're reading your email if they feel like it.
Post by Emily
A couple of days ago, it was surprisingly warm here and I thought I'd
check and see if the next day was forecast to be similar. Then I
thought about Yahoo. They have a weather page. So I fired it up --
for the first time since early February, and found that I had about a
thousand (I'm not exaggerating) e-mails. They were all deleted as
rapidly as possible. The government is welcome to read my Yahoo
e-mail since none of it matters at all. That's the address I give
when I have to give an e-mail address but have no intention of reading
anything they might ever send me.
I have two Thunderbird (Firefox) addresses that I use
for mail. I use Forte Agent for the newsgroup. While I
was trying to stop Forte Agent from making me have to
exit and reënter the program between every time I told
it to load new posts or send posts, I screwed up my
junk email address somehow, so that now although I
can receive and read emails from that address, I can't
send anything from it. The outgoing SMTP (or
whatever it is) is missing, and I haven't figured out
any way to fix it or to enter anything manually in that
field. The only things in that address that I'd want to
answer are messages from my two online "checking"
accounts, from which I don't want to write checks and
have declined the checkbook: I'm only using them
because they pay more than 1% interest. I had to
communicate with one of the banks. so I asked them
to change their address to my address that still
works, which used to be only for communicating with
non-business humans. I don't get too many emails
from my online banks so I guess I can tolerate
having them in the human email address.
I have extensive filters on my email accounts, and
anything annoying just goes straight into "trash"
automatically as long as I've set up a filter for it. My
human address only has a handful of robo-junk mail,
but my other account has a couple of hundred emails
in the trash folder at the moment. Every once in a
while I zap the messages in the trash folders.
The issue here, of course, is not the government monitoring your on-line
activity, but the lapse of restrictions on what you Internet Service
Provider (ISP) can obtain and subsequently sell. Your ISP has unique
access to ALL your internet activity including, but not restricted to
your email accounts. Every time you use a password to access some
account, for example, they probably have that information (unless the
company that you are doing business with has installed end-to-end
encryption which is unlikely). Have you ever entered your SS number?
How about a credit card account number? Your bank account number?

So, this is a really big deal and with the canceling of these rules by
the Trump administration, you are vastly more at risk from these
companies than you ever were from the federal government.
rumpelstiltskin
2017-04-20 01:11:21 UTC
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Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
It's always safe to assume that whatever you do, the
government knows about it.
They're welcome to track my browsing history but I don't want them
reading, and certainly not sharing, my e-mail.
I'd assume they're reading your email if they feel like it.
Post by Emily
A couple of days ago, it was surprisingly warm here and I thought I'd
check and see if the next day was forecast to be similar. Then I
thought about Yahoo. They have a weather page. So I fired it up --
for the first time since early February, and found that I had about a
thousand (I'm not exaggerating) e-mails. They were all deleted as
rapidly as possible. The government is welcome to read my Yahoo
e-mail since none of it matters at all. That's the address I give
when I have to give an e-mail address but have no intention of reading
anything they might ever send me.
I have two Thunderbird (Firefox) addresses that I use
for mail. I use Forte Agent for the newsgroup. While I
was trying to stop Forte Agent from making me have to
exit and reënter the program between every time I told
it to load new posts or send posts, I screwed up my
junk email address somehow, so that now although I
can receive and read emails from that address, I can't
send anything from it. The outgoing SMTP (or
whatever it is) is missing, and I haven't figured out
any way to fix it or to enter anything manually in that
field. The only things in that address that I'd want to
answer are messages from my two online "checking"
accounts, from which I don't want to write checks and
have declined the checkbook: I'm only using them
because they pay more than 1% interest. I had to
communicate with one of the banks. so I asked them
to change their address to my address that still
works, which used to be only for communicating with
non-business humans. I don't get too many emails
from my online banks so I guess I can tolerate
having them in the human email address.
I have extensive filters on my email accounts, and
anything annoying just goes straight into "trash"
automatically as long as I've set up a filter for it. My
human address only has a handful of robo-junk mail,
but my other account has a couple of hundred emails
in the trash folder at the moment. Every once in a
while I zap the messages in the trash folders.
The issue here, of course, is not the government monitoring your on-line
activity, but the lapse of restrictions on what you Internet Service
Provider (ISP) can obtain and subsequently sell. Your ISP has unique
access to ALL your internet activity including, but not restricted to
your email accounts. Every time you use a password to access some
account, for example, they probably have that information (unless the
company that you are doing business with has installed end-to-end
encryption which is unlikely). Have you ever entered your SS number?
How about a credit card account number? Your bank account number?
I've probably entered my SS-number online, and Amazon has
my credit card number. My online banks have my routing
number and SS number of course, and I am a bit nervous
about that.
Post by islander
So, this is a really big deal and with the canceling of these rules by
the Trump administration, you are vastly more at risk from these
companies than you ever were from the federal government.
I did have somebody charge twice in Florida to an
apparent replacement credit card that I never
received, back when I had an outside mailbox instead
of a mail slot in my door. A call to the credit card
company took care of both of those for me, though
I was still pissed that some crook had stolen money
from other people using my credit card number.

I had my SS benefits cancelled a couple of years
ago because I was in jail in Oklahoma for a serious
crime. A visit to the SS office in San Francisco
took care of that "He's sitting here right in front of
me". My original SS card went missing once and
I had to replace it, so maybe that got stolen or
maybe my information got stolen some other way.
Besides the SS number, the name that Oklahoma
had was also the name on my SS card, except
that it had a middle initial "S" I don't use my
middle initial on my SS card or elsewhere except
for taxes, and even if I did, "S" wouldn't be the
correct initial. That's the middle initial Harry
Truman used, just because he was always asked
for it though he didn't have a middle-name.
islander
2017-04-20 14:23:48 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
It's always safe to assume that whatever you do, the
government knows about it.
They're welcome to track my browsing history but I don't want them
reading, and certainly not sharing, my e-mail.
I'd assume they're reading your email if they feel like it.
Post by Emily
A couple of days ago, it was surprisingly warm here and I thought I'd
check and see if the next day was forecast to be similar. Then I
thought about Yahoo. They have a weather page. So I fired it up --
for the first time since early February, and found that I had about a
thousand (I'm not exaggerating) e-mails. They were all deleted as
rapidly as possible. The government is welcome to read my Yahoo
e-mail since none of it matters at all. That's the address I give
when I have to give an e-mail address but have no intention of reading
anything they might ever send me.
I have two Thunderbird (Firefox) addresses that I use
for mail. I use Forte Agent for the newsgroup. While I
was trying to stop Forte Agent from making me have to
exit and reënter the program between every time I told
it to load new posts or send posts, I screwed up my
junk email address somehow, so that now although I
can receive and read emails from that address, I can't
send anything from it. The outgoing SMTP (or
whatever it is) is missing, and I haven't figured out
any way to fix it or to enter anything manually in that
field. The only things in that address that I'd want to
answer are messages from my two online "checking"
accounts, from which I don't want to write checks and
have declined the checkbook: I'm only using them
because they pay more than 1% interest. I had to
communicate with one of the banks. so I asked them
to change their address to my address that still
works, which used to be only for communicating with
non-business humans. I don't get too many emails
from my online banks so I guess I can tolerate
having them in the human email address.
I have extensive filters on my email accounts, and
anything annoying just goes straight into "trash"
automatically as long as I've set up a filter for it. My
human address only has a handful of robo-junk mail,
but my other account has a couple of hundred emails
in the trash folder at the moment. Every once in a
while I zap the messages in the trash folders.
The issue here, of course, is not the government monitoring your on-line
activity, but the lapse of restrictions on what you Internet Service
Provider (ISP) can obtain and subsequently sell. Your ISP has unique
access to ALL your internet activity including, but not restricted to
your email accounts. Every time you use a password to access some
account, for example, they probably have that information (unless the
company that you are doing business with has installed end-to-end
encryption which is unlikely). Have you ever entered your SS number?
How about a credit card account number? Your bank account number?
I've probably entered my SS-number online, and Amazon has
my credit card number. My online banks have my routing
number and SS number of course, and I am a bit nervous
about that.
Post by islander
So, this is a really big deal and with the canceling of these rules by
the Trump administration, you are vastly more at risk from these
companies than you ever were from the federal government.
I did have somebody charge twice in Florida to an
apparent replacement credit card that I never
received, back when I had an outside mailbox instead
of a mail slot in my door. A call to the credit card
company took care of both of those for me, though
I was still pissed that some crook had stolen money
from other people using my credit card number.
I had my SS benefits cancelled a couple of years
ago because I was in jail in Oklahoma for a serious
crime. A visit to the SS office in San Francisco
took care of that "He's sitting here right in front of
me". My original SS card went missing once and
I had to replace it, so maybe that got stolen or
maybe my information got stolen some other way.
Besides the SS number, the name that Oklahoma
had was also the name on my SS card, except
that it had a middle initial "S" I don't use my
middle initial on my SS card or elsewhere except
for taxes, and even if I did, "S" wouldn't be the
correct initial. That's the middle initial Harry
Truman used, just because he was always asked
for it though he didn't have a middle-name.
You should be nervous. Nearly every keystroke that you type into your
computer eventually goes through your ISP. It is a treasure trove of
information for people who want to target you, not just to steal your
identity or use your credit card, but for profiling you for targeted
advertisement. No one likes to be targeted, but this piece of
Republican legislation allows exactly that.
rumpelstiltskin
2017-04-20 18:44:30 UTC
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Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by arthur wouk
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/28/privacy-protection-sell-web-browsing-history-data
Congress voted to kill rules meant to prevent internet service
providers from selling users' web browsing histories and app
storage histories to advertisers
Without these protections, ISPs are free to track your browsing
behavior and sell that data to advertisers without consent.
It's always safe to assume that whatever you do, the
government knows about it.
They're welcome to track my browsing history but I don't want them
reading, and certainly not sharing, my e-mail.
I'd assume they're reading your email if they feel like it.
Post by Emily
A couple of days ago, it was surprisingly warm here and I thought I'd
check and see if the next day was forecast to be similar. Then I
thought about Yahoo. They have a weather page. So I fired it up --
for the first time since early February, and found that I had about a
thousand (I'm not exaggerating) e-mails. They were all deleted as
rapidly as possible. The government is welcome to read my Yahoo
e-mail since none of it matters at all. That's the address I give
when I have to give an e-mail address but have no intention of reading
anything they might ever send me.
I have two Thunderbird (Firefox) addresses that I use
for mail. I use Forte Agent for the newsgroup. While I
was trying to stop Forte Agent from making me have to
exit and reënter the program between every time I told
it to load new posts or send posts, I screwed up my
junk email address somehow, so that now although I
can receive and read emails from that address, I can't
send anything from it. The outgoing SMTP (or
whatever it is) is missing, and I haven't figured out
any way to fix it or to enter anything manually in that
field. The only things in that address that I'd want to
answer are messages from my two online "checking"
accounts, from which I don't want to write checks and
have declined the checkbook: I'm only using them
because they pay more than 1% interest. I had to
communicate with one of the banks. so I asked them
to change their address to my address that still
works, which used to be only for communicating with
non-business humans. I don't get too many emails
from my online banks so I guess I can tolerate
having them in the human email address.
I have extensive filters on my email accounts, and
anything annoying just goes straight into "trash"
automatically as long as I've set up a filter for it. My
human address only has a handful of robo-junk mail,
but my other account has a couple of hundred emails
in the trash folder at the moment. Every once in a
while I zap the messages in the trash folders.
The issue here, of course, is not the government monitoring your on-line
activity, but the lapse of restrictions on what you Internet Service
Provider (ISP) can obtain and subsequently sell. Your ISP has unique
access to ALL your internet activity including, but not restricted to
your email accounts. Every time you use a password to access some
account, for example, they probably have that information (unless the
company that you are doing business with has installed end-to-end
encryption which is unlikely). Have you ever entered your SS number?
How about a credit card account number? Your bank account number?
I've probably entered my SS-number online, and Amazon has
my credit card number. My online banks have my routing
number and SS number of course, and I am a bit nervous
about that.
Post by islander
So, this is a really big deal and with the canceling of these rules by
the Trump administration, you are vastly more at risk from these
companies than you ever were from the federal government.
I did have somebody charge twice in Florida to an
apparent replacement credit card that I never
received, back when I had an outside mailbox instead
of a mail slot in my door. A call to the credit card
company took care of both of those for me, though
I was still pissed that some crook had stolen money
from other people using my credit card number.
I had my SS benefits cancelled a couple of years
ago because I was in jail in Oklahoma for a serious
crime. A visit to the SS office in San Francisco
took care of that "He's sitting here right in front of
me". My original SS card went missing once and
I had to replace it, so maybe that got stolen or
maybe my information got stolen some other way.
Besides the SS number, the name that Oklahoma
had was also the name on my SS card, except
that it had a middle initial "S" I don't use my
middle initial on my SS card or elsewhere except
for taxes, and even if I did, "S" wouldn't be the
correct initial. That's the middle initial Harry
Truman used, just because he was always asked
for it though he didn't have a middle-name.
You should be nervous. Nearly every keystroke that you type into your
computer eventually goes through your ISP. It is a treasure trove of
information for people who want to target you, not just to steal your
identity or use your credit card, but for profiling you for targeted
advertisement. No one likes to be targeted, but this piece of
Republican legislation allows exactly that.
I'm not scared. Annoyed perhaps, but not scared.

me
2017-04-20 08:57:32 UTC
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How are you vastly more at risk from companies than the federal government? Do you suppose Trump would rather be surveilled by the government or Yahoo?
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