Discussion:
Fantastic Deal at Cosco
(too old to reply)
mg
2018-03-11 00:21:15 UTC
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This high-quality, lightweight, 3-step, Folding Stool from Costco is
unbelievably cheap and it might prevent your wife, or daughter, or
yourself from falling and sustaining a serious injury. I've got one of
these and I love it.

https://www.costco.com/Cosco-3-step-Folding-Stool-with-Rubber-Hand-Grip.product.100361848.html



---------------------------------------------------------------
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-03-11 05:02:47 UTC
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Post by mg
This high-quality, lightweight, 3-step, Folding Stool from Costco is
unbelievably cheap and it might prevent your wife, or daughter, or
yourself from falling and sustaining a serious injury. I've got one of
these and I love it.
https://www.costco.com/Cosco-3-step-Folding-Stool-with-Rubber-Hand-Grip.product.100361848.html
---------------------------------------------------------------
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
I had one of those, hanging around for years. A week or so
ago I finally left it out on the sidewalk and somebody took it.
With my 10-foot ceilings, the 3-step ladder didn't get me any
closer to the ceiling than a wooden chair, but the wooden
chair has the advantage of having a back to hold onto while
I'm stretching the other arm up to unscrew the dead light
bulb and screw in a new one.
mg
2018-03-11 07:45:27 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
This high-quality, lightweight, 3-step, Folding Stool from Costco is
unbelievably cheap and it might prevent your wife, or daughter, or
yourself from falling and sustaining a serious injury. I've got one of
these and I love it.
https://www.costco.com/Cosco-3-step-Folding-Stool-with-Rubber-Hand-Grip.product.100361848.html
---------------------------------------------------------------
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
I had one of those, hanging around for years. A week or so
ago I finally left it out on the sidewalk and somebody took it.
With my 10-foot ceilings, the 3-step ladder didn't get me any
closer to the ceiling than a wooden chair, but the wooden
chair has the advantage of having a back to hold onto while
I'm stretching the other arm up to unscrew the dead light
bulb and screw in a new one.
I have one like you're probably talking about. I bought it about 20
years ago at Walmart. This one is different, though. It's heavy duty
and it does have a back to hold on to, like a chair does.

The top step is 28" compared to a chair which is about 18". So, if
someone is 69" tall with an arm length of 26", it adds up something
like this:

Top Step: 28"
Height: 69"
Arm Length: 26"
--------------------

Total: 123" (~10 feet)
b***@gmail.com
2018-03-11 10:15:01 UTC
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Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
This high-quality, lightweight, 3-step, Folding Stool from Costco is
unbelievably cheap and it might prevent your wife, or daughter, or
yourself from falling and sustaining a serious injury. I've got one of
these and I love it.
https://www.costco.com/Cosco-3-step-Folding-Stool-with-Rubber-Hand-Grip.product.100361848.html
---------------------------------------------------------------
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
I had one of those, hanging around for years. A week or so
ago I finally left it out on the sidewalk and somebody took it.
With my 10-foot ceilings, the 3-step ladder didn't get me any
closer to the ceiling than a wooden chair, but the wooden
chair has the advantage of having a back to hold onto while
I'm stretching the other arm up to unscrew the dead light
bulb and screw in a new one.
I have one like you're probably talking about. I bought it about 20
years ago at Walmart. This one is different, though. It's heavy duty
and it does have a back to hold on to, like a chair does.
The top step is 28" compared to a chair which is about 18". So, if
someone is 69" tall with an arm length of 26", it adds up something
Top Step: 28"
Height: 69"
Arm Length: 26"
--------------------
Total: 123" (~10 feet)
So that's about 8 feet when you fall off the thing and slam your nose into the ground?
mg
2018-03-11 10:27:16 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
This high-quality, lightweight, 3-step, Folding Stool from Costco is
unbelievably cheap and it might prevent your wife, or daughter, or
yourself from falling and sustaining a serious injury. I've got one of
these and I love it.
https://www.costco.com/Cosco-3-step-Folding-Stool-with-Rubber-Hand-Grip.product.100361848.html
---------------------------------------------------------------
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
I had one of those, hanging around for years. A week or so
ago I finally left it out on the sidewalk and somebody took it.
With my 10-foot ceilings, the 3-step ladder didn't get me any
closer to the ceiling than a wooden chair, but the wooden
chair has the advantage of having a back to hold onto while
I'm stretching the other arm up to unscrew the dead light
bulb and screw in a new one.
I have one like you're probably talking about. I bought it about 20
years ago at Walmart. This one is different, though. It's heavy duty
and it does have a back to hold on to, like a chair does.
The top step is 28" compared to a chair which is about 18". So, if
someone is 69" tall with an arm length of 26", it adds up something
Top Step: 28"
Height: 69"
Arm Length: 26"
--------------------
Total: 123" (~10 feet)
So that's about 8 feet when you fall off the thing and slam your nose into the ground?
Yup. My daughter cleans houses for a living and she cleans my house
also, and she climbs all over the place. So, I mostly bought this for
her. I think it's about the safest thing that you can buy, but one
can, obviously, still fall off of it.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-03-11 13:19:58 UTC
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Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
This high-quality, lightweight, 3-step, Folding Stool from Costco is
unbelievably cheap and it might prevent your wife, or daughter, or
yourself from falling and sustaining a serious injury. I've got one of
these and I love it.
https://www.costco.com/Cosco-3-step-Folding-Stool-with-Rubber-Hand-Grip.product.100361848.html
---------------------------------------------------------------
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
I had one of those, hanging around for years. A week or so
ago I finally left it out on the sidewalk and somebody took it.
With my 10-foot ceilings, the 3-step ladder didn't get me any
closer to the ceiling than a wooden chair, but the wooden
chair has the advantage of having a back to hold onto while
I'm stretching the other arm up to unscrew the dead light
bulb and screw in a new one.
I have one like you're probably talking about. I bought it about 20
years ago at Walmart. This one is different, though. It's heavy duty
and it does have a back to hold on to, like a chair does.
The top step is 28" compared to a chair which is about 18". So, if
someone is 69" tall with an arm length of 26", it adds up something
Top Step: 28"
Height: 69"
Arm Length: 26"
--------------------
Total: 123" (~10 feet)
It's something I'd rarely have any use for though,
that would just be hanging around forever like the
three-step ladder I just got rid of, and like the
flimsy-wire shopping cart that I think my son picked
up of the street 30 years ago, which I never used
because it doesn't hold enough groceries. I just
got rid of that finally, too. I put it back out on the
street. It was gone the next day, so it's somebody
else's problem now. I don't have a garage to
cram with all kinds of junk.
mg
2018-03-12 02:56:20 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
This high-quality, lightweight, 3-step, Folding Stool from Costco is
unbelievably cheap and it might prevent your wife, or daughter, or
yourself from falling and sustaining a serious injury. I've got one of
these and I love it.
https://www.costco.com/Cosco-3-step-Folding-Stool-with-Rubber-Hand-Grip.product.100361848.html
---------------------------------------------------------------
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
I had one of those, hanging around for years. A week or so
ago I finally left it out on the sidewalk and somebody took it.
With my 10-foot ceilings, the 3-step ladder didn't get me any
closer to the ceiling than a wooden chair, but the wooden
chair has the advantage of having a back to hold onto while
I'm stretching the other arm up to unscrew the dead light
bulb and screw in a new one.
I have one like you're probably talking about. I bought it about 20
years ago at Walmart. This one is different, though. It's heavy duty
and it does have a back to hold on to, like a chair does.
The top step is 28" compared to a chair which is about 18". So, if
someone is 69" tall with an arm length of 26", it adds up something
Top Step: 28"
Height: 69"
Arm Length: 26"
--------------------
Total: 123" (~10 feet)
It's something I'd rarely have any use for though,
that would just be hanging around forever like the
three-step ladder I just got rid of, and like the
flimsy-wire shopping cart that I think my son picked
up of the street 30 years ago, which I never used
because it doesn't hold enough groceries. I just
got rid of that finally, too. I put it back out on the
street. It was gone the next day, so it's somebody
else's problem now. I don't have a garage to
cram with all kinds of junk.
I actually have 3 sheds now (and a garage) and I still have a mess and
I need to get rid of a lot of stuff. Lately -- since my heart surgery
-- I've been thinking that maybe I won't live forever and maybe I
ought to start throwing some junk away to make it easier for my kids
after I become an angel in heaven (or a demon in hell), or return to
nothingness.

Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
b***@gmail.com
2018-03-12 05:13:13 UTC
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Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
It's something I'd rarely have any use for though,
that would just be hanging around forever like the
three-step ladder I just got rid of, and like the
flimsy-wire shopping cart that I think my son picked
up of the street 30 years ago, which I never used
because it doesn't hold enough groceries. I just
got rid of that finally, too. I put it back out on the
street. It was gone the next day, so it's somebody
else's problem now. I don't have a garage to
cram with all kinds of junk.
I actually have 3 sheds now (and a garage) and I still have a mess and
I need to get rid of a lot of stuff. Lately -- since my heart surgery
-- I've been thinking that maybe I won't live forever and maybe I
ought to start throwing some junk away to make it easier for my kids
after I become an angel in heaven (or a demon in hell), or return to
nothingness.
Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
I have one 6X8 shed that's so full I have to take out a bucket of stuff so I can get inside. There are 5 cabinets with 60 drawers each and some of the drawers have a divider so I can store maybe 500 different part numbers. One coffee can contains about 2000 transistors or more. I decided I only need 2 cabinets of 120 drawers and have been sorting things out for several days and putting extra parts in a large bag. I sold one bag yesterday for $5 at a swap meet. Must have been a couple thousand parts in it. It's all electronic parts of diodes, transistors, resistors, capacitors, ICs, relays, pots, thermistors, etc. But it's maddening when I sort things and lose something that I might need someday. I had a drawer of old germanium transistors and diodes from 1967 that I can't find now. But I looked on Ebay and can buy 50 of the things for a couple dollars, so it's not all bad. I used to think I would invent some great new product and would need lots of parts on hand to build it, so I started collecting parts 40 years ago and storing them in my shed. My goal now is to have just what I need and have some extra space on the shelves and be able to walk into the shed.
mg
2018-03-12 09:40:34 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
It's something I'd rarely have any use for though,
that would just be hanging around forever like the
three-step ladder I just got rid of, and like the
flimsy-wire shopping cart that I think my son picked
up of the street 30 years ago, which I never used
because it doesn't hold enough groceries. I just
got rid of that finally, too. I put it back out on the
street. It was gone the next day, so it's somebody
else's problem now. I don't have a garage to
cram with all kinds of junk.
I actually have 3 sheds now (and a garage) and I still have a mess and
I need to get rid of a lot of stuff. Lately -- since my heart surgery
-- I've been thinking that maybe I won't live forever and maybe I
ought to start throwing some junk away to make it easier for my kids
after I become an angel in heaven (or a demon in hell), or return to
nothingness.
Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
I have one 6X8 shed that's so full I have to take out a bucket of stuff so I can get inside. There are 5 cabinets with 60 drawers each and some of the drawers have a divider so I can store maybe 500 different part numbers. One coffee can contains about 2000 transistors or more. I decided I only need 2 cabinets of 120 drawers and have been sorting things out for several days and putting extra parts in a large bag. I sold one bag yesterday for $5 at a swap meet. Must have been a couple thousand parts in it. It's all electronic parts of diodes, transistors, resistors, capacitors, ICs, relays, pots, thermistors, etc. But it's maddening when I sort things and lose something that I might need someday. I had a drawer of old germanium transistors and diodes from 1967 that I can't find now. But I looked on Ebay and can buy 50 of the things for a couple dollars, so it's not all bad. I used to think I would invent some great new product and would need lots of parts on hand to build it, so I
started collecting parts 40 years ago and storing them in my shed. My goal now is to have just what I need and have some extra space on the shelves and be able to walk into the shed.
I lost my interest in electronics many years ago, but I do still have
a Tektronix O'scope in one of my sheds. It was a nice one in its day,
but now I imagine it's only worth about $100-$200. I also have a
couple of small cabinets with electronic parts in it: one with a
collection of resistors and one with a collection of capacitors, I
think, and I have a nice power supply and a breadboard with a large
collection of jumper wires. I have a complete set of Radio Shack
Engineer's Mini-Notebooks.

I have two or three digital multimeters. I have one old military one
and a brand-new, state of the art Fluke, and an inexpensive Chinese
multimeter. They're all in excellent condition including the Chinese
one. In fact, I think the inexpensive Chinese multimeter is actually
more accurate on the current measurement than the expensive Fluke.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-03-12 07:34:28 UTC
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2018 20:56:20 -0600, mg <***@none.nl> wrote:
<snip>
Post by mg
Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
After my heart valve replacement, I noticed that I was bleeding
more if I scratched off a scab. I was on Lisinopril, so I stopped
taking it, and I've stopped taking a baby aspirin (which was
prescribed) too, except that for a week I was having arthritis in
my left wrist so I took a full aspirin. The arthritis isn't
completely gone not, but it's usually not particularly noticeable.
mg
2018-03-12 09:44:39 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
<snip>
Post by mg
Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
After my heart valve replacement, I noticed that I was bleeding
more if I scratched off a scab. I was on Lisinopril, so I stopped
taking it, and I've stopped taking a baby aspirin (which was
prescribed) too, except that for a week I was having arthritis in
my left wrist so I took a full aspirin. The arthritis isn't
completely gone not, but it's usually not particularly noticeable.
I've decided to permanently take a blood thinner based on what I've
read on the internet, but instead of taking baby aspirin, I'm taking
one fourth of an Alka Seltzer a day because aspirin really tears up my
stomach.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-03-12 14:39:40 UTC
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Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
<snip>
Post by mg
Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
After my heart valve replacement, I noticed that I was bleeding
more if I scratched off a scab. I was on Lisinopril, so I stopped
taking it, and I've stopped taking a baby aspirin (which was
prescribed) too, except that for a week I was having arthritis in
my left wrist so I took a full aspirin. The arthritis isn't
completely gone not, but it's usually not particularly noticeable.
I've decided to permanently take a blood thinner based on what I've
read on the internet, but instead of taking baby aspirin, I'm taking
one fourth of an Alka Seltzer a day because aspirin really tears up my
stomach.
I've never personally had a stomach problem taking aspirin.
It's the only pain killer that really works for me until you get
into the really hard-core pain killers such as Vicodin and
Norco and the stuff that Rush Limbaugh was/is addicted to.
I may as well flush Tylenol and Ibuprofen down the toilet
for all the difference they make to me. I did once have ten
or so plastibottles of Tylenol, because the hospital kept
giving them to me. I ended up throwing them into a street
trash receptacle after I tried to give them to a drugstore for
"safe" disposal but the drugstore wouldn't take them.
mg
2018-03-12 17:41:22 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
<snip>
Post by mg
Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
After my heart valve replacement, I noticed that I was bleeding
more if I scratched off a scab. I was on Lisinopril, so I stopped
taking it, and I've stopped taking a baby aspirin (which was
prescribed) too, except that for a week I was having arthritis in
my left wrist so I took a full aspirin. The arthritis isn't
completely gone not, but it's usually not particularly noticeable.
I've decided to permanently take a blood thinner based on what I've
read on the internet, but instead of taking baby aspirin, I'm taking
one fourth of an Alka Seltzer a day because aspirin really tears up my
stomach.
I've never personally had a stomach problem taking aspirin.
It's the only pain killer that really works for me until you get
into the really hard-core pain killers such as Vicodin and
Norco and the stuff that Rush Limbaugh was/is addicted to.
I may as well flush Tylenol and Ibuprofen down the toilet
for all the difference they make to me. I did once have ten
or so plastibottles of Tylenol, because the hospital kept
giving them to me. I ended up throwing them into a street
trash receptacle after I tried to give them to a drugstore for
"safe" disposal but the drugstore wouldn't take them.
Whenever I get a prescription pain pill, I always save it for later
just in case something happens that I really need one. Actually, now
that I think about it, I endure quite a bit of pain to keep my stash
of pain pills -- and come to think of it -- I suppose most of them
probably expired years ago. :-)
rumpelstiltskin
2018-03-12 18:44:36 UTC
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Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
<snip>
Post by mg
Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
After my heart valve replacement, I noticed that I was bleeding
more if I scratched off a scab. I was on Lisinopril, so I stopped
taking it, and I've stopped taking a baby aspirin (which was
prescribed) too, except that for a week I was having arthritis in
my left wrist so I took a full aspirin. The arthritis isn't
completely gone not, but it's usually not particularly noticeable.
I've decided to permanently take a blood thinner based on what I've
read on the internet, but instead of taking baby aspirin, I'm taking
one fourth of an Alka Seltzer a day because aspirin really tears up my
stomach.
I've never personally had a stomach problem taking aspirin.
It's the only pain killer that really works for me until you get
into the really hard-core pain killers such as Vicodin and
Norco and the stuff that Rush Limbaugh was/is addicted to.
I may as well flush Tylenol and Ibuprofen down the toilet
for all the difference they make to me. I did once have ten
or so plastibottles of Tylenol, because the hospital kept
giving them to me. I ended up throwing them into a street
trash receptacle after I tried to give them to a drugstore for
"safe" disposal but the drugstore wouldn't take them.
Whenever I get a prescription pain pill, I always save it for later
just in case something happens that I really need one. Actually, now
that I think about it, I endure quite a bit of pain to keep my stash
of pain pills -- and come to think of it -- I suppose most of them
probably expired years ago. :-)
They still work long after the "expiration date".
I remember hearing about an outfit that was
soliciting expired medications, for people in
third-world countries who couldn't afford the

I thought I'd accidentally thrown away all my
hoarded pain pills, but I later found that though
I had accidentally thrown away the Norco and
Vicodin, I hadn't thrown away the more recent
oxycodone. I got 21 of those for a tooth
extraction in 2010, but only used one at the
time. I'd better keep an eye out to make sure
Rush Limbaugh doesn't start sneaking around
my neighborhood. I talked to my sister and
she also didn't see how people could get
addicted to pain pills, since she'd had them
and also had no desire to take them after
the pain had abated. Maybe the propensity
to pain-pill addiction is genetic.
mg
2018-03-12 19:44:58 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
<snip>
Post by mg
Actually, I've noticed, just in the last few days, that I can hear my
heart beat when I lay down. What's up with that, I wonder? I've
decided, as a result, to be more faithful about taking my blood
thinner medicine and see if that helps.
After my heart valve replacement, I noticed that I was bleeding
more if I scratched off a scab. I was on Lisinopril, so I stopped
taking it, and I've stopped taking a baby aspirin (which was
prescribed) too, except that for a week I was having arthritis in
my left wrist so I took a full aspirin. The arthritis isn't
completely gone not, but it's usually not particularly noticeable.
I've decided to permanently take a blood thinner based on what I've
read on the internet, but instead of taking baby aspirin, I'm taking
one fourth of an Alka Seltzer a day because aspirin really tears up my
stomach.
I've never personally had a stomach problem taking aspirin.
It's the only pain killer that really works for me until you get
into the really hard-core pain killers such as Vicodin and
Norco and the stuff that Rush Limbaugh was/is addicted to.
I may as well flush Tylenol and Ibuprofen down the toilet
for all the difference they make to me. I did once have ten
or so plastibottles of Tylenol, because the hospital kept
giving them to me. I ended up throwing them into a street
trash receptacle after I tried to give them to a drugstore for
"safe" disposal but the drugstore wouldn't take them.
Whenever I get a prescription pain pill, I always save it for later
just in case something happens that I really need one. Actually, now
that I think about it, I endure quite a bit of pain to keep my stash
of pain pills -- and come to think of it -- I suppose most of them
probably expired years ago. :-)
They still work long after the "expiration date".
I remember hearing about an outfit that was
soliciting expired medications, for people in
third-world countries who couldn't afford the
I suspect that people who are hoarding pain pills are doing it for the
same reason that I do and wouldn't want to give them away.
Post by rumpelstiltskin
I thought I'd accidentally thrown away all my
hoarded pain pills, but I later found that though
I had accidentally thrown away the Norco and
Vicodin, I hadn't thrown away the more recent
oxycodone. I got 21 of those for a tooth
extraction in 2010, but only used one at the
time. I'd better keep an eye out to make sure
Rush Limbaugh doesn't start sneaking around
my neighborhood. I talked to my sister and
she also didn't see how people could get
addicted to pain pills, since she'd had them
and also had no desire to take them after
the pain had abated. Maybe the propensity
to pain-pill addiction is genetic.
My dad was an alcoholic, so I've always been extremely fearful of
getting hooked on something, or becoming addicted to something and, as
a result, have been very careful my entire life. How that I'm 76 years
old, however, I don't worry about it very much, anymore.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-03-13 09:37:14 UTC
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On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 13:44:58 -0600, mg <***@none.nl> wrote:
<snip>
Post by mg
My dad was an alcoholic, so I've always been extremely fearful of
getting hooked on something, or becoming addicted to something and, as
a result, have been very careful my entire life. How that I'm 76 years
old, however, I don't worry about it very much, anymore.
We're both in the crematorium waiting room now.

Emily
2018-03-12 13:29:07 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
After my heart valve replacement, I noticed that I was bleeding
more if I scratched off a scab. I was on Lisinopril, so I stopped
taking it, and I've stopped taking a baby aspirin (which was
prescribed) too, except that for a week I was having arthritis in
my left wrist so I took a full aspirin. The arthritis isn't
completely gone not, but it's usually not particularly noticeable.
Do you check your BP at home? If you're not going to take your
lisinopril, you should at least do that.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-03-12 14:39:40 UTC
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Post by Emily
Post by rumpelstiltskin
After my heart valve replacement, I noticed that I was bleeding
more if I scratched off a scab. I was on Lisinopril, so I stopped
taking it, and I've stopped taking a baby aspirin (which was
prescribed) too, except that for a week I was having arthritis in
my left wrist so I took a full aspirin. The arthritis isn't
completely gone not, but it's usually not particularly noticeable.
Do you check your BP at home? If you're not going to take your
lisinopril, you should at least do that.
No, I'm not that paranoid. Every bleedin' time I go to the
hospital, they weigh me and take my blood pressure first, even
if I'd just been to the hospital the day before and had it done
then. Last Wednesday I went to the hospital for a routine GP
appointment and to get a sonogram, which I'd managed to get
scheduled for the same day. My GP was very happy with my
progress, and flattered me that it was unusual to have a
patient who, when he asks him to do something, actually does
it. I told him, though, when he mentioned again a colonoscopy,
that I hoped not to set foot inside a hospital again for at least
another month. I also told him I wasn't taking the two
"Frankenstein" drugs that an unfamiliar doctor had foisted on
me as I was leaving the hospital the last time.
(Metoprolol Tartrate and Pantoprazole) I took one pill of
each the first day,but then read the "side effects" and the
comments from humans who had taken them, and decided
right away that I didn't want anything to do with either of
those drugs.

For quite a while I was carrying a cane, though not using it
much, but lately I don't feel any need to bother taking the
cane. I'm still walking more slowly than most people, which
is annoying, but at least my stamina is improving.
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