Discussion:
Booming Trump Economy?
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Weatherman
2018-08-06 16:10:14 UTC
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Not hardly:

https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-06 21:02:37 UTC
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Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gary
2018-08-06 21:26:15 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 14:02:37 -0700 (PDT),
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
I'd sure love to own a few thousand shares of Amazon :-)

https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/AMZN?p=AMZN
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-06 21:44:47 UTC
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Post by Gary
On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 14:02:37 -0700 (PDT),
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
I'd sure love to own a few thousand shares of Amazon :-)
https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/AMZN?p=AMZN
So, why don't you buy one share of AMZN for $1800? It's better than lottery tickets. It usually goes up $20 a day. And think of the joy you will have checking the price of AMZN several times a day.
Gary
2018-08-06 22:18:27 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 14:44:47 -0700 (PDT),
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Gary
On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 14:02:37 -0700 (PDT),
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
I'd sure love to own a few thousand shares of Amazon :-)
https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/AMZN?p=AMZN
So, why don't you buy one share of AMZN for $1800? It's better than lottery tickets. It usually goes up $20 a day. And think of the joy you will have checking the price of AMZN several times a day.
It sounds like a good bet. I use to enjoy speculating in
stocks. But when we retired, my wife and I agreed to keep
our money in safe, interesting drawing investments. We
haven't been making much -- but at least we've not lost any.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-07 08:48:06 UTC
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Post by Gary
On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 14:44:47 -0700 (PDT),
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Gary
On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 14:02:37 -0700 (PDT),
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
I'd sure love to own a few thousand shares of Amazon :-)
https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/AMZN?p=AMZN
So, why don't you buy one share of AMZN for $1800? It's better than lottery tickets. It usually goes up $20 a day. And think of the joy you will have checking the price of AMZN several times a day.
It sounds like a good bet. I use to enjoy speculating in
stocks. But when we retired, my wife and I agreed to keep
our money in safe, interesting drawing investments. We
haven't been making much -- but at least we've not lost any.
0
My best bet was Microsoft in 1995. I bought 3K and it went up to 30K in 4 years. But I didn't sell it until it lost value to 20K. So I made 17K on a 3K bet. And there was WalMart I bought for 15 cents in 1979. I didn't actually do it, it was in a managed account. I think I made over 6 figures on that one. But it's all gone now and I'm looking for a part time job.
Weatherman
2018-08-06 22:34:29 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-07 08:21:37 UTC
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Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-07 15:07:33 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-07 17:52:00 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
You should enjoy life a little bit. Go buy one share of Amazon so you can make or lose $20 a day. Think about the pleasure of going grocery shopping knowing the $20 you made from Amazon paid for the groceries that day. I was talking to a friend last Saturday who was complaining about the hot weather and he didn't want to turn on the air-conditioning in his house because it would cost $100 a week. He owns the house probably worth 500K with no mortgage and his taxes are way low due to proposition 13. He has a pension and a couple hundred K in the market and gets social security. He has money coming in from everywhere but won't turn on the air conditioning (sp)to stay cool. And he is 84 and doesn't have long to spend it. I tried to convince him he should enjoy life and turn on the air conditioner which probably won't be needed after a couple months. If I had his money, I'd run the air conditioner 24/7 and buy 10 more shares of Amazon.
islander
2018-08-07 20:12:26 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
You should enjoy life a little bit. Go buy one share of Amazon so you can make or lose $20 a day. Think about the pleasure of going grocery shopping knowing the $20 you made from Amazon paid for the groceries that day. I was talking to a friend last Saturday who was complaining about the hot weather and he didn't want to turn on the air-conditioning in his house because it would cost $100 a week. He owns the house probably worth 500K with no mortgage and his taxes are way low due to proposition 13. He has a pension and a couple hundred K in the market and gets social security. He has money coming in from everywhere but won't turn on the air conditioning (sp)to stay cool. And he is 84 and doesn't have long to spend it. I tried to convince him he should enjoy life and turn on the air conditioner which probably won't be needed after a couple months. If I had his money, I'd run the air conditioner 24/7 and buy 10 more shares of Amazon.
It is a life style that is not unusual for people who survived the Great
Depression. It is characterized by not wasting anything. Personally, I
don't have a problem with that.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-08 03:57:28 UTC
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Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
You should enjoy life a little bit. Go buy one share of Amazon so you can make or lose $20 a day. Think about the pleasure of going grocery shopping knowing the $20 you made from Amazon paid for the groceries that day. I was talking to a friend last Saturday who was complaining about the hot weather and he didn't want to turn on the air-conditioning in his house because it would cost $100 a week. He owns the house probably worth 500K with no mortgage and his taxes are way low due to proposition 13. He has a pension and a couple hundred K in the market and gets social security. He has money coming in from everywhere but won't turn on the air conditioning (sp)to stay cool. And he is 84 and doesn't have long to spend it. I tried to convince him he should enjoy life and turn on the air conditioner which probably won't be needed after a couple months. If I had his money, I'd run the air conditioner 24/7 and buy 10 more shares of Amazon.
It is a life style that is not unusual for people who survived the Great
Depression. It is characterized by not wasting anything. Personally, I
don't have a problem with that.
My mother was like that. I had to eat every scrap of food I put on my plate or I had it served to me the next meal. It was a good lesson and I still eat everything on my plate or it goes into the fridge and I eat it the next day.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-08 04:40:40 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
You should enjoy life a little bit. Go buy one share of Amazon so you can make or lose $20 a day. Think about the pleasure of going grocery shopping knowing the $20 you made from Amazon paid for the groceries that day. I was talking to a friend last Saturday who was complaining about the hot weather and he didn't want to turn on the air-conditioning in his house because it would cost $100 a week. He owns the house probably worth 500K with no mortgage and his taxes are way low due to proposition 13. He has a pension and a couple hundred K in the market and gets social security. He has money coming in from everywhere but won't turn on the air conditioning (sp)to stay cool. And he is 84 and doesn't have long to spend it. I tried to convince him he should enjoy life and turn on the air conditioner which probably won't be needed after a couple months. If I had his money, I'd run the air conditioner 24/7 and buy 10 more shares of Amazon.
It is a life style that is not unusual for people who survived the Great
Depression. It is characterized by not wasting anything. Personally, I
don't have a problem with that.
My mother was like that. I had to eat every scrap of food I put on my plate or I had it served to me the next meal. It was a good lesson and I still eat everything on my plate or it goes into the fridge and I eat it the next day.
I always do that too. I almost always finish
everything on my plate if it's food I made myself,
and nearly as often even when it's at a restaurant.
I avoid ordering things that contain "shrimp" or
other bugs at restaurants, though.

I remember hearing of Margaret Mead with a
companion visiting a tribal family, where fried
beetles or something like that were being
prepared. Her companion whispered in horror
"Are we going to eat that?" Margaret Mead
replied sternly, "If they serve it to us, we're
going to eat it!"
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-08 23:17:46 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
You should enjoy life a little bit. Go buy one share of Amazon so you can make or lose $20 a day. Think about the pleasure of going grocery shopping knowing the $20 you made from Amazon paid for the groceries that day. I was talking to a friend last Saturday who was complaining about the hot weather and he didn't want to turn on the air-conditioning in his house because it would cost $100 a week. He owns the house probably worth 500K with no mortgage and his taxes are way low due to proposition 13. He has a pension and a couple hundred K in the market and gets social security. He has money coming in from everywhere but won't turn on the air conditioning (sp)to stay cool. And he is 84 and doesn't have long to spend it. I tried to convince him he should enjoy life and turn on the air conditioner which probably won't be needed after a couple months. If I had his money, I'd run the air conditioner 24/7 and buy 10 more shares of Amazon.
It is a life style that is not unusual for people who survived the Great
Depression. It is characterized by not wasting anything. Personally, I
don't have a problem with that.
My mother was like that. I had to eat every scrap of food I put on my plate or I had it served to me the next meal. It was a good lesson and I still eat everything on my plate or it goes into the fridge and I eat it the next day.
I always do that too. I almost always finish
everything on my plate if it's food I made myself,
and nearly as often even when it's at a restaurant.
I avoid ordering things that contain "shrimp" or
other bugs at restaurants, though.
I remember hearing of Margaret Mead with a
companion visiting a tribal family, where fried
beetles or something like that were being
prepared. Her companion whispered in horror
"Are we going to eat that?" Margaret Mead
replied sternly, "If they serve it to us, we're
going to eat it!"
There are only a couple things I can't eat. Macaroni and cheese and canned green beans. I ate that stuff in 6th grade and then stood up and vomited it up all over the cafeteria floor. Never touched that stuff again. When I was in the Marine Corps, they used to serve pretty good steaks on Saturday night right after pay day since most of the guys went to town to spend their paychecks and the messhall didn't have to cook too many. My favorite meal is still won-ton soup with shrimp in it. But since they closed my favorite place, I can't find a good place to replace it. The new places I find are all more expensive with lousy soup. Think I'll take an Asian cooking class and learn how to do it. Or, I'll join a singles club and try and find an Asian girl who knows how to cook.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-09 00:39:45 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
You should enjoy life a little bit. Go buy one share of Amazon so you can make or lose $20 a day. Think about the pleasure of going grocery shopping knowing the $20 you made from Amazon paid for the groceries that day. I was talking to a friend last Saturday who was complaining about the hot weather and he didn't want to turn on the air-conditioning in his house because it would cost $100 a week. He owns the house probably worth 500K with no mortgage and his taxes are way low due to proposition 13. He has a pension and a couple hundred K in the market and gets social security. He has money coming in from everywhere but won't turn on the air conditioning (sp)to stay cool. And he is 84 and doesn't have long to spend it. I tried to convince him he should enjoy life and turn on the air conditioner which probably won't be needed after a couple months. If I had his money, I'd run the air conditioner 24/7 and buy 10 more shares of Amazon.
It is a life style that is not unusual for people who survived the Great
Depression. It is characterized by not wasting anything. Personally, I
don't have a problem with that.
My mother was like that. I had to eat every scrap of food I put on my plate or I had it served to me the next meal. It was a good lesson and I still eat everything on my plate or it goes into the fridge and I eat it the next day.
I always do that too. I almost always finish
everything on my plate if it's food I made myself,
and nearly as often even when it's at a restaurant.
I avoid ordering things that contain "shrimp" or
other bugs at restaurants, though.
I remember hearing of Margaret Mead with a
companion visiting a tribal family, where fried
beetles or something like that were being
prepared. Her companion whispered in horror
"Are we going to eat that?" Margaret Mead
replied sternly, "If they serve it to us, we're
going to eat it!"
There are only a couple things I can't eat. Macaroni and cheese and canned green beans. I ate that stuff in 6th grade and then stood up and vomited it up all over the cafeteria floor. Never touched that stuff again. When I was in the Marine Corps, they used to serve pretty good steaks on Saturday night right after pay day since most of the guys went to town to spend their paychecks and the messhall didn't have to cook too many. My favorite meal is still won-ton soup with shrimp in it. But since they closed my favorite place, I can't find a good place to replace it. The new places I find are all more expensive with lousy soup. Think I'll take an Asian cooking class and learn how to do it. Or, I'll join a singles club and try and find an Asian girl who knows how to cook.
I've never had canned green beans that I can recall,
but I don't much care even for uncanned green beans.
As I kid, I couldn't stand spinach, but that was because
it was canned spinach. It was quite an eye-opener
when I first encountered fresh spinach. I can tolerate
lettuce, but fresh spinach is the only green leafy
vegetable I actually like.

My favourite Chinese restaurant/take-out downtown
has free soup for any meal over $5. They have two
kinds, hot-and-sour which I usually get, and egg-drop
which I sometimes get for a change because that's
really good too. I'm not sure if the $5 still obtains,
but I never get out of there without spending at least
$10 anyway.
https://tinyurl.com/yctzblhv

It's a "greasy spoon", but that's what I like. It's an
unusual week that I don't go there at least once.
Best time is soon as they open, at 10:00 AM, when
everything is freshly cooked.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-09 03:14:16 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
There are only a couple things I can't eat. Macaroni and cheese and canned green beans. I ate that stuff in 6th grade and then stood up and vomited it up all over the cafeteria floor. Never touched that stuff again. When I was in the Marine Corps, they used to serve pretty good steaks on Saturday night right after pay day since most of the guys went to town to spend their paychecks and the messhall didn't have to cook too many. My favorite meal is still won-ton soup with shrimp in it. But since they closed my favorite place, I can't find a good place to replace it. The new places I find are all more expensive with lousy soup. Think I'll take an Asian cooking class and learn how to do it. Or, I'll join a singles club and try and find an Asian girl who knows how to cook.
I've never had canned green beans that I can recall,
but I don't much care even for uncanned green beans.
As I kid, I couldn't stand spinach, but that was because
it was canned spinach. It was quite an eye-opener
when I first encountered fresh spinach. I can tolerate
lettuce, but fresh spinach is the only green leafy
vegetable I actually like.
My favourite Chinese restaurant/take-out downtown
has free soup for any meal over $5. They have two
kinds, hot-and-sour which I usually get, and egg-drop
which I sometimes get for a change because that's
really good too. I'm not sure if the $5 still obtains,
but I never get out of there without spending at least
$10 anyway.
https://tinyurl.com/yctzblhv
It's a "greasy spoon", but that's what I like. It's an
unusual week that I don't go there at least once.
Best time is soon as they open, at 10:00 AM, when
everything is freshly cooked.
I can't get your link to work. It loads but gives me a blank page. There used to be a place called the 'Golden Dragon' on the street with the cable cars in 1965. Is that place still there?. I can't remember eating fresh spinach but it sounds good. I'll try some if I see it at the swap meet. I learned at the OC fair cooking show to never throw out the water if you boil vegetables. Most of the vitamins are in the water. Same with peeled carrots. The vitamins are in the peelings and the water.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-09 12:29:50 UTC
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There are only a couple things I can't eat. Macaroni and cheese and canned green beans. I ate that stuff in 6th grade and then stood up and vomited it up all over the cafeteria floor. Never touched that stuff again. When I was in the Marine Corps, they used to serve pretty good steaks on Saturday night right after pay day since most of the guys went to town to spend their paychecks and the messhall didn't have to cook too many. My favorite meal is still won-ton soup with shrimp in it. But since they closed my favorite place, I can't find a good place to replace it. The new places I find are all more expensive with lousy soup. Think I'll take an Asian cooking class and learn how to do it. Or, I'll join a singles club and try and find an Asian girl who knows how to cook.
I've never had canned green beans that I can recall,
but I don't much care even for uncanned green beans.
As I kid, I couldn't stand spinach, but that was because
it was canned spinach. It was quite an eye-opener
when I first encountered fresh spinach. I can tolerate
lettuce, but fresh spinach is the only green leafy
vegetable I actually like.
My favourite Chinese restaurant/take-out downtown
has free soup for any meal over $5. They have two
kinds, hot-and-sour which I usually get, and egg-drop
which I sometimes get for a change because that's
really good too. I'm not sure if the $5 still obtains,
but I never get out of there without spending at least
$10 anyway.
https://tinyurl.com/yctzblhv
It's a "greasy spoon", but that's what I like. It's an
unusual week that I don't go there at least once.
Best time is soon as they open, at 10:00 AM, when
everything is freshly cooked.
I can't get your link to work. It loads but gives me a blank page. There used to be a place called the 'Golden Dragon' on the street with the cable cars in 1965. Is that place still there?. I can't remember eating fresh spinach but it sounds good. I'll try some if I see it at the swap meet. I learned at the OC fair cooking show to never throw out the water if you boil vegetables. Most of the vitamins are in the water. Same with peeled carrots. The vitamins are in the peelings and the water.
That's odd. The "tinyurl" link works for me.
Here's the link without tinyurl:
https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60713-d3743002-Reviews-China_Fun_Express-San_Francisco_California.html

I have heard of the "Golden Dragon" and it's probably still
there. I avoid spending money myself in the touristy areas,
for the same reason people everywhere who live near touristy
areas don't usually eat at them or shop at them, I suppose:
too much focus on fru-fru and not enough focus on "worth it
for the money".

The street with the Cable Cars would be Powell Street
at that point. The two cable car lines (Powell and Hyde,
and Powell and Mason) both travel on Powell Street
near Chinatown. I used to ride them all the time when
I first came to San Francisco, since they only cost a
quarter and were part of the regular transit system, so
you could use your two-hour (or however long it was)
transfers to make connections. Now the Cable Cars
cost about ten bucks and are just part of the Tourist-
Trap institution, so the only time I've ridden them in
the last forty years or so is when relatives were in
town. Even the regular transit system costs $2.75
for non-geriatric adults now, and the transfers are
only good for an hour and a half, though I hear
that's going to change to two hours because an
hour and a half often isn't long enough even to
complete a single shopping trip. Since I'm a city
resident of geriatric age though, I get to ride
public transportation as much as I want for free.
When my son's in town I do feel guilty about how
much he has to pay, so I sometimes pay his fare
and I always pay for both of us at lunch.

The Cable Cars used to be lots of fun for me,
so I do miss them. They are awfully expensive
to maintain though, so they always were more
of a luxury for the residents than a self-sustaining
part of the city transit system.

You can get a map of the cable car routes
by googling on "Cable Car Routes map".
the URL is way to long to reproduce without
tinyurl, so here's the tinyurl for it if that will
work for you:
https://tinyurl.com/yb8c29dk

Besides the Powell and Hyde and Powell and
Mason lines, there's the California Street line,
which is not connected to the other two, and
not as spectacular like those other two IMO.
I'm not sure if I've ever ridden it at all.
The Powell and Hyde is the best for tourists,
because it goes down a terrifyingly steep
stretch on Hyde Street for the last few blocks
starting at the former Russian Embassy, which
is now empty after the Russians were driven
out during the latest McCarthyist round, and
then it was ransacked by the Gestapo after
the Russians left.

The other line that starts from the crowded
tempting target for mass-murderers at Powell
and Market is the Powell and Mason. That
one ends more in the Fisherman's Wharf
tourist trap area, though it's an easy walk to
get there from the end of the Powell and
Hyde line too.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-09 20:56:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
I can't get your link to work. It loads but gives me a blank page. There used to be a place called the 'Golden Dragon' on the street with the cable cars in 1965. Is that place still there?. I can't remember eating fresh spinach but it sounds good. I'll try some if I see it at the swap meet. I learned at the OC fair cooking show to never throw out the water if you boil vegetables. Most of the vitamins are in the water. Same with peeled carrots. The vitamins are in the peelings and the water.
That's odd. The "tinyurl" link works for me.
https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60713-d3743002-Reviews-China_Fun_Express-San_Francisco_California.html
I have heard of the "Golden Dragon" and it's probably still
there. I avoid spending money myself in the touristy areas,
for the same reason people everywhere who live near touristy
too much focus on fru-fru and not enough focus on "worth it
for the money".
The street with the Cable Cars would be Powell Street
at that point. The two cable car lines (Powell and Hyde,
and Powell and Mason) both travel on Powell Street
near Chinatown. I used to ride them all the time when
I first came to San Francisco, since they only cost a
quarter and were part of the regular transit system, so
you could use your two-hour (or however long it was)
transfers to make connections. Now the Cable Cars
cost about ten bucks and are just part of the Tourist-
Trap institution, so the only time I've ridden them in
the last forty years or so is when relatives were in
town. Even the regular transit system costs $2.75
for non-geriatric adults now, and the transfers are
only good for an hour and a half, though I hear
that's going to change to two hours because an
hour and a half often isn't long enough even to
complete a single shopping trip. Since I'm a city
resident of geriatric age though, I get to ride
public transportation as much as I want for free.
When my son's in town I do feel guilty about how
much he has to pay, so I sometimes pay his fare
and I always pay for both of us at lunch.
The Cable Cars used to be lots of fun for me,
so I do miss them. They are awfully expensive
to maintain though, so they always were more
of a luxury for the residents than a self-sustaining
part of the city transit system.
You can get a map of the cable car routes
by googling on "Cable Car Routes map".
the URL is way to long to reproduce without
tinyurl, so here's the tinyurl for it if that will
https://tinyurl.com/yb8c29dk
Besides the Powell and Hyde and Powell and
Mason lines, there's the California Street line,
which is not connected to the other two, and
not as spectacular like those other two IMO.
I'm not sure if I've ever ridden it at all.
The Powell and Hyde is the best for tourists,
because it goes down a terrifyingly steep
stretch on Hyde Street for the last few blocks
starting at the former Russian Embassy, which
is now empty after the Russians were driven
out during the latest McCarthyist round, and
then it was ransacked by the Gestapo after
the Russians left.
The other line that starts from the crowded
tempting target for mass-murderers at Powell
and Market is the Powell and Mason. That
one ends more in the Fisherman's Wharf
tourist trap area, though it's an easy walk to
get there from the end of the Powell and
Hyde line too.
That link worked. I saw a picture of a plate of rice, egg rolls and some kind of vegetable dish. The new place replacing the old place where I used to go is remodeling the entire place. The new place is a Japanese place with pretty pictures on the windows showing some of the meals coming soon. One of them got my attention and was some sort of soup that looked like won-ton soup with brokkoli and carrots and so forth. Probably will cost $10 and won't be as good as the real thing. I'm waiting for them to open in a couple weeks. I don't know why they chose to remodel the entire place since there was already a kitchen and serving counter and tables in the old place. Maybe it will be a high class place where you first sit at a table, study the menu, order the meal, and then they bring everything to you. I have a gift card for Applebee's with $10 left on it. They have some excellent French Onion Soup and Caesar Salad for $9. They put a big piece of cheese on the dark brown soup and I usually ask for more Caesar dressing. Next time, I'm going to take my own chopped green onions and grape tomatoes and Swiss cheese to add to the salad. Nothing like building your own. When I went to the old Asian place for the best won-ton soup, I brought my own baby corn and snow peas for the chef to add to the soup. My little waitress girl friend always knew what I wanted and explained it all to the chef. I never met the chef, but I sure wish I knew what his recipe was.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-09 23:50:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
I can't get your link to work. It loads but gives me a blank page. There used to be a place called the 'Golden Dragon' on the street with the cable cars in 1965. Is that place still there?. I can't remember eating fresh spinach but it sounds good. I'll try some if I see it at the swap meet. I learned at the OC fair cooking show to never throw out the water if you boil vegetables. Most of the vitamins are in the water. Same with peeled carrots. The vitamins are in the peelings and the water.
That's odd. The "tinyurl" link works for me.
https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60713-d3743002-Reviews-China_Fun_Express-San_Francisco_California.html
I have heard of the "Golden Dragon" and it's probably still
there. I avoid spending money myself in the touristy areas,
for the same reason people everywhere who live near touristy
too much focus on fru-fru and not enough focus on "worth it
for the money".
The street with the Cable Cars would be Powell Street
at that point. The two cable car lines (Powell and Hyde,
and Powell and Mason) both travel on Powell Street
near Chinatown. I used to ride them all the time when
I first came to San Francisco, since they only cost a
quarter and were part of the regular transit system, so
you could use your two-hour (or however long it was)
transfers to make connections. Now the Cable Cars
cost about ten bucks and are just part of the Tourist-
Trap institution, so the only time I've ridden them in
the last forty years or so is when relatives were in
town. Even the regular transit system costs $2.75
for non-geriatric adults now, and the transfers are
only good for an hour and a half, though I hear
that's going to change to two hours because an
hour and a half often isn't long enough even to
complete a single shopping trip. Since I'm a city
resident of geriatric age though, I get to ride
public transportation as much as I want for free.
When my son's in town I do feel guilty about how
much he has to pay, so I sometimes pay his fare
and I always pay for both of us at lunch.
The Cable Cars used to be lots of fun for me,
so I do miss them. They are awfully expensive
to maintain though, so they always were more
of a luxury for the residents than a self-sustaining
part of the city transit system.
You can get a map of the cable car routes
by googling on "Cable Car Routes map".
the URL is way to long to reproduce without
tinyurl, so here's the tinyurl for it if that will
https://tinyurl.com/yb8c29dk
Besides the Powell and Hyde and Powell and
Mason lines, there's the California Street line,
which is not connected to the other two, and
not as spectacular like those other two IMO.
I'm not sure if I've ever ridden it at all.
The Powell and Hyde is the best for tourists,
because it goes down a terrifyingly steep
stretch on Hyde Street for the last few blocks
starting at the former Russian Embassy, which
is now empty after the Russians were driven
out during the latest McCarthyist round, and
then it was ransacked by the Gestapo after
the Russians left.
The other line that starts from the crowded
tempting target for mass-murderers at Powell
and Market is the Powell and Mason. That
one ends more in the Fisherman's Wharf
tourist trap area, though it's an easy walk to
get there from the end of the Powell and
Hyde line too.
That link worked. I saw a picture of a plate of rice, egg rolls and some kind of vegetable dish. The new place replacing the old place where I used to go is remodeling the entire place. The new place is a Japanese place with pretty pictures on the windows showing some of the meals coming soon. One of them got my attention and was some sort of soup that looked like won-ton soup with brokkoli and carrots and so forth. Probably will cost $10 and won't be as good as the real thing. I'm waiting for them to open in a couple weeks. I don't know why they chose to remodel the entire place since there was already a kitchen and serving counter and tables in the old place. Maybe it will be a high class place where you first sit at a table, study the menu, order the meal, and then they bring everything to you. I have a gift card for Applebee's with $10 left on it. They have some excellent French Onion Soup and Caesar Salad for $9. They put a big piece of cheese on the dark brown soup and I
usually ask for more Caesar dressing. Next time, I'm going to take my own chopped green onions and grape tomatoes and Swiss cheese to add to the salad. Nothing like building your own. When I went to the old Asian place for the best won-ton soup, I brought my own baby corn and snow peas for the chef to add to the soup. My little waitress girl friend always knew what I wanted and explained it all to the chef. I never met the chef, but I sure wish I knew what his recipe was.
I don't like eating in restaurants much, so when I'm
alone I usually get the food to "take out", and carry it or
bus it down to the Embarcadero to eat it in the open air.

My son, who was here for a month recently, does like
to eat in restaurants though, and since he's not a
pathetic "senior" like me, he doesn't get free bus rides.
He also bitches and moans about the food getting cold
on the walk or ride to the Embarcadero. So when he's
with me we always eat in the restaurant just so I don't
have to listen to him bitching and moaning. We nearly
always get the table near the window, though, which
I prefer. Most people find it too hot there, or too
easily within range of any passing Jihadists, I guess.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-08 01:37:46 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
You should enjoy life a little bit. Go buy one share of Amazon so you can make or lose $20 a day. Think about the pleasure of going grocery shopping knowing the $20 you made from Amazon paid for the groceries that day. I was talking to a friend last Saturday who was complaining about the hot weather and he didn't want to turn on the air-conditioning in his house because it would cost $100 a week. He owns the house probably worth 500K with no mortgage and his taxes are way low due to proposition 13. He has a pension and a couple hundred K in the market and gets social security. He has money coming in from everywhere but won't turn on the air conditioning (sp)to stay cool. And he is 84 and doesn't have long to spend it. I tried to convince him he should enjoy life and turn on the air conditioner which probably won't be needed after a couple months. If I had his money, I'd run the air conditioner 24/7 and buy 10 more shares of Amazon.
I don't enjoy gambling, and I'm making a lot more than
$20 a day on just my two CDs.

I guess most people enjoy gambling. My mom used
to come to Vegas once a year to play the nickel slots
all day. One year the mother of a close friend and
former roommate (Michael: he didn't like to be called
"Mike") came down from Concord in the East Bay at
the same time. Michael was working for the casinos
as his main job but he also never gambled himself.
During the trip, we thought at one point that our two
moms must have had enough by now, so we went to
check on them. There were nickels pouring out of
my mom's machine, and she yelled frantically "Get
me a bucket!". We did, and then we took off again
for another couple of hours because we knew that
was going to fire them up quite a while longer.
Gary
2018-08-08 11:41:10 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured
FDA ? That is the Food and Drug Administration. They
don't insure many checking accounts.
Post by rumpelstiltskin
checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
Rumple is telling us that his CDs are each valued at about
$250,000. That's the most the FDIC will insure a checking
account. And if that is only 70% of his loose cash -- then
he must have a total of about $700,000.

That's a lot of money for a wandering English boy :-)
Gary
2018-08-08 16:39:27 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Gary
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured
FDA ? That is the Food and Drug Administration. They
don't insure many checking accounts.
Post by rumpelstiltskin
checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
Rumple is telling us that his CDs are each valued at about
$250,000. That's the most the FDIC will insure a checking
account. And if that is only 70% of his loose cash -- then
he must have a total of about $700,000.
That's a lot of money for a wandering English boy :-)
Actually, that was my guess as to his "maximum" liquid
assets. My guess to his low asset value would be -- about
$420,000. Still quite good for an immigrant.
Pearly
2018-08-09 13:10:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gary
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% and 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured
FDA ? That is the Food and Drug Administration. They
don't insure many checking accounts.
Post by rumpelstiltskin
checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
Rumple is telling us that his CDs are each valued at about
$250,000. That's the most the FDIC will insure a checking
account. And if that is only 70% of his loose cash -- then
he must have a total of about $700,000.
That's a lot of money for a wandering English boy :-)
That's a lot of money for a hard working American girl!
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-09 15:24:11 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Pearly
Post by Gary
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% an*d 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured
FDA ? That is the Food and Drug Administration. They
don't insure many checking accounts.
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
Post by Pearly
Post by Gary
Post by rumpelstiltskin
checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
Rumple is telling us that his CDs are each valued at about
$250,000. That's the most the FDIC will insure a checking
account. And if that is only 70% of his loose cash -- then
he must have a total of about $700,000.
That's a lot of money for a wandering English boy :-)
My wanderings included quitting IBM and moving to
San Francisco in 1968. It took my mom 20 years to get
over that, but IMO it was the best thing I ever did for
myself. If I'd settled down in upstate New York, I might
have shot myself in boredom and desperation after a
few years. Next was my "hippie year" in Yoorup in
1972. I was too late for San Francisco's great year,
which was 1967, but I was exactly right for Amsterdam's
great year. Next was quitting working forever at age 54
in 1999. I would have quit a couple of years earlier,
but I was offered part time, and negotiated working
8 hours a day only Tuesday thru Thursday, which I
could have done forever if it had lasted because having
a four-day weekend every week made it an actual
pleasure to go to work on Tuesdays: the only time in
my life except for my very first job, as a teenager
among teenagers, that work was ever a pleasure.
After a while though, a new super-boss wanted me to
go back to full time. I didn't need the money so that
was "Goodbye" time for me.

I had an Aussie roommate about 1975 whose
former roommate, a Marxist, called him a "bourgeois
parasite" as he was kicking him out. That was
accurate, since he was living in the USA on his
father's money, though in his defense he was only
18. I'd recently read a Vonnegut book in which the
King of Michigan, having started out as a stern
military leader, ended up as an "obscene
voluptuary". As soon as I saw that term, I felt
"That's me!" It seemed immediately compatible
that a "bourgeois parasite" and an "obscene
voluptuary" should be roommates.

Actually, my life by most people's standards
has been pretty ascetic, not out of any virtue
but only because of preference (or lack of
imagination).

Well, I've had a good time talking about
myself. Hope you weren't too bored.
Post by Pearly
That's a lot of money for a hard working American girl!
Pearly
2018-08-09 19:57:52 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by Pearly
Post by Gary
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% an*d 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured
FDA ? That is the Food and Drug Administration. They
don't insure many checking accounts.
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
Post by Pearly
Post by Gary
Post by rumpelstiltskin
checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
Rumple is telling us that his CDs are each valued at about
$250,000. That's the most the FDIC will insure a checking
account. And if that is only 70% of his loose cash -- then
he must have a total of about $700,000.
That's a lot of money for a wandering English boy :-)
My wanderings included quitting IBM and moving to
San Francisco in 1968. It took my mom 20 years to get
over that, but IMO it was the best thing I ever did for
myself. If I'd settled down in upstate New York, I might
have shot myself in boredom and desperation after a
few years. Next was my "hippie year" in Yoorup in
1972. I was too late for San Francisco's great year,
which was 1967, but I was exactly right for Amsterdam's
great year. Next was quitting working forever at age 54
in 1999. I would have quit a couple of years earlier,
but I was offered part time, and negotiated working
8 hours a day only Tuesday thru Thursday, which I
could have done forever if it had lasted because having
a four-day weekend every week made it an actual
pleasure to go to work on Tuesdays: the only time in
my life except for my very first job, as a teenager
among teenagers, that work was ever a pleasure.
After a while though, a new super-boss wanted me to
go back to full time. I didn't need the money so that
was "Goodbye" time for me.
I had an Aussie roommate about 1975 whose
former roommate, a Marxist, called him a "bourgeois
parasite" as he was kicking him out. That was
accurate, since he was living in the USA on his
father's money, though in his defense he was only
18. I'd recently read a Vonnegut book in which the
King of Michigan, having started out as a stern
military leader, ended up as an "obscene
voluptuary". As soon as I saw that term, I felt
"That's me!" It seemed immediately compatible
that a "bourgeois parasite" and an "obscene
voluptuary" should be roommates.
Actually, my life by most people's standards
has been pretty ascetic, not out of any virtue
but only because of preference (or lack of
imagination).
Well, I've had a good time talking about
myself. Hope you weren't too bored.
Post by Pearly
That's a lot of money for a hard working American girl!
Not at all bored. Your post was very interesting. I might try to put my
story into a post one day. I wish I had done more traveling. I visited
England once -- and I loved it. I'd like to do it again.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-09 23:50:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Pearly
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by Pearly
Post by Gary
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Weatherman
https://thinkprogress.org/trump-august-2018-jobs-report-hourly-earnings-cf8dd53c3ff7/
Amazon is up 24.46 today or 80% for the year. Where is the bad news about the economy? I want to know. If an election were held today, Trump would win by a landslide.
Gee, I wonder how many folks thought just like you in 08 and 29?
I lost 18K in one day in 1999 and learned my lesson. In 08, I hedged my bets and bought a bear market fund (BEARX) which gained 50% while the market dropped 50%. Not a bad move but I still lost 7% and got all that back plus 6% more in 09. But nowadays I have 4 bond funds all in the red. I barely make 3%. Amazon is just a fun thing to do. It's wild and crazy but fun to watch.
I have 70% of my money in two FDA-insured one-year
CDs, paying 2.35% an*d 2.5% as I recall. When each of
those time out, I'll have the money from them wired into
my FDA-insured
FDA ? That is the Food and Drug Administration. They
don't insure many checking accounts.
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
Post by Pearly
Post by Gary
Post by rumpelstiltskin
checking account (not both at the same
time!) then look for whatever the best deals in
FDA-insured CDs are at that time, getting the money
from one into another CD before the money from the
other gets into my checking account. Uninspired, but
super-safe. I don't want to do CD's longer than a year,
because interest rates seem to be going up.
Rumple is telling us that his CDs are each valued at about
$250,000. That's the most the FDIC will insure a checking
account. And if that is only 70% of his loose cash -- then
he must have a total of about $700,000.
That's a lot of money for a wandering English boy :-)
My wanderings included quitting IBM and moving to
San Francisco in 1968. It took my mom 20 years to get
over that, but IMO it was the best thing I ever did for
myself. If I'd settled down in upstate New York, I might
have shot myself in boredom and desperation after a
few years. Next was my "hippie year" in Yoorup in
1972. I was too late for San Francisco's great year,
which was 1967, but I was exactly right for Amsterdam's
great year. Next was quitting working forever at age 54
in 1999. I would have quit a couple of years earlier,
but I was offered part time, and negotiated working
8 hours a day only Tuesday thru Thursday, which I
could have done forever if it had lasted because having
a four-day weekend every week made it an actual
pleasure to go to work on Tuesdays: the only time in
my life except for my very first job, as a teenager
among teenagers, that work was ever a pleasure.
After a while though, a new super-boss wanted me to
go back to full time. I didn't need the money so that
was "Goodbye" time for me.
I had an Aussie roommate about 1975 whose
former roommate, a Marxist, called him a "bourgeois
parasite" as he was kicking him out. That was
accurate, since he was living in the USA on his
father's money, though in his defense he was only
18. I'd recently read a Vonnegut book in which the
King of Michigan, having started out as a stern
military leader, ended up as an "obscene
voluptuary". As soon as I saw that term, I felt
"That's me!" It seemed immediately compatible
that a "bourgeois parasite" and an "obscene
voluptuary" should be roommates.
Actually, my life by most people's standards
has been pretty ascetic, not out of any virtue
but only because of preference (or lack of
imagination).
Well, I've had a good time talking about
myself. Hope you weren't too bored.
Post by Pearly
That's a lot of money for a hard working American girl!
Not at all bored. Your post was very interesting. I might try to put my
story into a post one day. I wish I had done more traveling. I visited
England once -- and I loved it. I'd like to do it again.
I haven't been out of the USA/Canada since 1999.
My son keeps bugging me about going somewhere
on vacation, and even about both of us moving to
England. I'm just not very interested, though if I
get booted out of my rent-controlled apartment,
I may consider moving back to England, but the
standout place for me to live would be London,
and London is as expensive as San Francisco.

Travelling anywhere, I think, would entail
getting one of those new ID's I suppose, for which
people have been waiting in line for three hours
or more at the DMV in San Francisco. The DMV,
I hear, is even turning people away because they
won't be able to get through the line that day.
The geniuses in the government are never at a
loss for thinking up ways to make people's lives
more difficult.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-10 03:14:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-10 03:48:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
When I was in the hospital recovering from cancer surgery, one doctor remarked about my condition and I asked him what he meant and he just said it was fancy words for my condition (FWC). But they did a good job at the VA. I had great faith in them even if I didn't understand what they were talking about (DU) (don't understand).
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-10 04:20:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
Esperanto comes to mind. It was supposed to become the
universal language, easier than most languages to master.
Where is it now? In the dustbin someplace.

Humans make their languages the way they do for good
reason, I guess, but don't ask me what that reason is.
Most of us don't want something simple, I suppose. We
want something that helps define who we are. Or at least
that's what I was told by a certain young man from
Nantucket about whose astonishing accomplishments
much has been bruited, if you'll excuse my use of the word
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
b flanier
2018-08-10 05:05:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thursday, August 9, 2018 at 9:20:40 PM UTC-7, rumpelstiltskin wrote:
,... if you'll excuse my use of the word
Post by rumpelstiltskin
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
if you will excuse me, Rumpel, for talking in your face, "bruited"
(usually followed by "about") just simply means "spread" which, if
not confused with mayo, is pretty simple and much more recognized
than the somewhat pretentious "bruited".

Don't get me wrong- I like "bruited" -it indicates the bruiter
has more than a 900 word vocabulary and baffles the bruitee.

Bye the bye, "bruited" also has a medical meaning which is the abnormal
sound heard within the body during auscultation, esp a heart murmur.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-10 12:16:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 22:05:42 -0700 (PDT), b flanier
Post by b flanier
,... if you'll excuse my use of the word
Post by rumpelstiltskin
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
if you will excuse me, Rumpel, for talking in your face, "bruited"
(usually followed by "about") just simply means "spread" which, if
not confused with mayo, is pretty simple and much more recognized
than the somewhat pretentious "bruited".
To me it implies considerably more active interaction
than merely "spread". Maybe that's just me.
Post by b flanier
Don't get me wrong- I like "bruited" -it indicates the bruiter
has more than a 900 word vocabulary and baffles the bruitee.
Bye the bye, "bruited" also has a medical meaning which is the abnormal
sound heard within the body during auscultation, esp a heart murmur.
I didn't know that, though I did have a heart
murmur, which eventually developed into a
need for a heart-valve replacement. The
need was apparent to me in the first week
of last September, though it was about four
months later before I was scheduled for the
replacement operation. I was in almost as
good health as a 20-year-old before last
September, but I've definitely been not what
I used to be since then.

In California now, there's a lot of
brouhaha about the new "Real ID" (which
unfortunately is also a passport to get into
some stupid online gaming/social site).
This is coming to a head in California now,
with throngs of people waiting in line at
the DMV for eight hours then having to
come back again. This "real ID" was
propagandized in 2005 when the
congressional geniuses (please forgive
the contradiction in terms) said it would
help prevent terrorism, though it does
nothing of the sort. It does create a
huge burden on the people though,
and on the DMV which is charged with
issuing the "real ID" though it has
nowhere near the staff it would need to
do that efficiently. I read that it's hard
to get a "real ID" without a US passport,
but I don't have a US passport, nor do
38% of native-born Americans. My
British passport is way out of date, since
I haven't been out of the USA since 1999.
Half the States who have addressed the
requirements of the 2005 law have
refused to comply, but as 2020
approaches, one won't be able to get
on an airplane even for domestic
flights, or enter a Federal Building, or
blow one's nose, without a "real ID".
I've been reading that, rather than
increasing personal security, the
statute significantly decreases it, since
it assembles so much data, including
financial data, into one place that it's
a dream-scenario for computer
hackers.

If this is a nightmare for native-
born US citizens, just imagine what it
will be for me as a British National.
Maybe I'll get lucky and die before I
have to deal with that new Byzantine
monolith of bureaucracy.
islander
2018-08-10 14:36:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 22:05:42 -0700 (PDT), b flanier
Post by b flanier
,... if you'll excuse my use of the word
Post by rumpelstiltskin
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
if you will excuse me, Rumpel, for talking in your face, "bruited"
(usually followed by "about") just simply means "spread" which, if
not confused with mayo, is pretty simple and much more recognized
than the somewhat pretentious "bruited".
To me it implies considerably more active interaction
than merely "spread". Maybe that's just me.
Post by b flanier
Don't get me wrong- I like "bruited" -it indicates the bruiter
has more than a 900 word vocabulary and baffles the bruitee.
Bye the bye, "bruited" also has a medical meaning which is the abnormal
sound heard within the body during auscultation, esp a heart murmur.
I didn't know that, though I did have a heart
murmur, which eventually developed into a
need for a heart-valve replacement. The
need was apparent to me in the first week
of last September, though it was about four
months later before I was scheduled for the
replacement operation. I was in almost as
good health as a 20-year-old before last
September, but I've definitely been not what
I used to be since then.
In California now, there's a lot of
brouhaha about the new "Real ID" (which
unfortunately is also a passport to get into
some stupid online gaming/social site).
This is coming to a head in California now,
with throngs of people waiting in line at
the DMV for eight hours then having to
come back again. This "real ID" was
propagandized in 2005 when the
congressional geniuses (please forgive
the contradiction in terms) said it would
help prevent terrorism, though it does
nothing of the sort. It does create a
huge burden on the people though,
and on the DMV which is charged with
issuing the "real ID" though it has
nowhere near the staff it would need to
do that efficiently. I read that it's hard
to get a "real ID" without a US passport,
but I don't have a US passport, nor do
38% of native-born Americans. My
British passport is way out of date, since
I haven't been out of the USA since 1999.
Half the States who have addressed the
requirements of the 2005 law have
refused to comply, but as 2020
approaches, one won't be able to get
on an airplane even for domestic
flights, or enter a Federal Building, or
blow one's nose, without a "real ID".
I've been reading that, rather than
increasing personal security, the
statute significantly decreases it, since
it assembles so much data, including
financial data, into one place that it's
a dream-scenario for computer
hackers.
If this is a nightmare for native-
born US citizens, just imagine what it
will be for me as a British National.
Maybe I'll get lucky and die before I
have to deal with that new Byzantine
monolith of bureaucracy.
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-10 18:52:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 22:05:42 -0700 (PDT), b flanier
Post by b flanier
,... if you'll excuse my use of the word
Post by rumpelstiltskin
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
if you will excuse me, Rumpel, for talking in your face, "bruited"
(usually followed by "about") just simply means "spread" which, if
not confused with mayo, is pretty simple and much more recognized
than the somewhat pretentious "bruited".
To me it implies considerably more active interaction
than merely "spread". Maybe that's just me.
Post by b flanier
Don't get me wrong- I like "bruited" -it indicates the bruiter
has more than a 900 word vocabulary and baffles the bruitee.
Bye the bye, "bruited" also has a medical meaning which is the abnormal
sound heard within the body during auscultation, esp a heart murmur.
I didn't know that, though I did have a heart
murmur, which eventually developed into a
need for a heart-valve replacement. The
need was apparent to me in the first week
of last September, though it was about four
months later before I was scheduled for the
replacement operation. I was in almost as
good health as a 20-year-old before last
September, but I've definitely been not what
I used to be since then.
In California now, there's a lot of
brouhaha about the new "Real ID" (which
unfortunately is also a passport to get into
some stupid online gaming/social site).
This is coming to a head in California now,
with throngs of people waiting in line at
the DMV for eight hours then having to
come back again. This "real ID" was
propagandized in 2005 when the
congressional geniuses (please forgive
the contradiction in terms) said it would
help prevent terrorism, though it does
nothing of the sort. It does create a
huge burden on the people though,
and on the DMV which is charged with
issuing the "real ID" though it has
nowhere near the staff it would need to
do that efficiently. I read that it's hard
to get a "real ID" without a US passport,
but I don't have a US passport, nor do
38% of native-born Americans. My
British passport is way out of date, since
I haven't been out of the USA since 1999.
Half the States who have addressed the
requirements of the 2005 law have
refused to comply, but as 2020
approaches, one won't be able to get
on an airplane even for domestic
flights, or enter a Federal Building, or
blow one's nose, without a "real ID".
I've been reading that, rather than
increasing personal security, the
statute significantly decreases it, since
it assembles so much data, including
financial data, into one place that it's
a dream-scenario for computer
hackers.
If this is a nightmare for native-
born US citizens, just imagine what it
will be for me as a British National.
Maybe I'll get lucky and die before I
have to deal with that new Byzantine
monolith of bureaucracy.
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
They say "war is hell", but "bureaucracy" can give war a
run for its money.
El Castor
2018-08-10 19:16:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 22:05:42 -0700 (PDT), b flanier
Post by b flanier
,... if you'll excuse my use of the word
Post by rumpelstiltskin
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
if you will excuse me, Rumpel, for talking in your face, "bruited"
(usually followed by "about") just simply means "spread" which, if
not confused with mayo, is pretty simple and much more recognized
than the somewhat pretentious "bruited".
To me it implies considerably more active interaction
than merely "spread". Maybe that's just me.
Post by b flanier
Don't get me wrong- I like "bruited" -it indicates the bruiter
has more than a 900 word vocabulary and baffles the bruitee.
Bye the bye, "bruited" also has a medical meaning which is the abnormal
sound heard within the body during auscultation, esp a heart murmur.
I didn't know that, though I did have a heart
murmur, which eventually developed into a
need for a heart-valve replacement. The
need was apparent to me in the first week
of last September, though it was about four
months later before I was scheduled for the
replacement operation. I was in almost as
good health as a 20-year-old before last
September, but I've definitely been not what
I used to be since then.
In California now, there's a lot of
brouhaha about the new "Real ID" (which
unfortunately is also a passport to get into
some stupid online gaming/social site).
This is coming to a head in California now,
with throngs of people waiting in line at
the DMV for eight hours then having to
come back again. This "real ID" was
propagandized in 2005 when the
congressional geniuses (please forgive
the contradiction in terms) said it would
help prevent terrorism, though it does
nothing of the sort. It does create a
huge burden on the people though,
and on the DMV which is charged with
issuing the "real ID" though it has
nowhere near the staff it would need to
do that efficiently. I read that it's hard
to get a "real ID" without a US passport,
but I don't have a US passport, nor do
38% of native-born Americans. My
British passport is way out of date, since
I haven't been out of the USA since 1999.
Half the States who have addressed the
requirements of the 2005 law have
refused to comply, but as 2020
approaches, one won't be able to get
on an airplane even for domestic
flights, or enter a Federal Building, or
blow one's nose, without a "real ID".
I've been reading that, rather than
increasing personal security, the
statute significantly decreases it, since
it assembles so much data, including
financial data, into one place that it's
a dream-scenario for computer
hackers.
If this is a nightmare for native-
born US citizens, just imagine what it
will be for me as a British National.
Maybe I'll get lucky and die before I
have to deal with that new Byzantine
monolith of bureaucracy.
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-11 00:44:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Well, drivers around here are not polite. I drive a small pickup truck and everybody wants to pass me. It doesn't matter if I'm going 35 or 55, they have to pass me up and run to the next red light. Sometimes, I match my speed to the car in the next lane so the tailgater can't pass me up. He weaves back and forth looking for an open path to race up to the next red light. And when I'm stopped at a red light, the guy behind sits right on my rear bumper. If I move a couple inches ahead, he moves a couple inches ahead behind me. I just do it for kicks and move a few inches at a time to see what the guy behind will do. And there are a lot of drivers that sit in areas that say "Keep Clear". I wish the cops would give them a ticket.
islander
2018-08-11 04:21:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Well, drivers around here are not polite. I drive a small pickup truck and everybody wants to pass me. It doesn't matter if I'm going 35 or 55, they have to pass me up and run to the next red light. Sometimes, I match my speed to the car in the next lane so the tailgater can't pass me up. He weaves back and forth looking for an open path to race up to the next red light. And when I'm stopped at a red light, the guy behind sits right on my rear bumper. If I move a couple inches ahead, he moves a couple inches ahead behind me. I just do it for kicks and move a few inches at a time to see what the guy behind will do. And there are a lot of drivers that sit in areas that say "Keep Clear". I wish the cops would give them a ticket.
One of these days you are going to try that trick with someone who has
an anger management problem and a sidearm.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-13 22:45:15 UTC
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Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Well, drivers around here are not polite. I drive a small pickup truck and everybody wants to pass me. It doesn't matter if I'm going 35 or 55, they have to pass me up and run to the next red light. Sometimes, I match my speed to the car in the next lane so the tailgater can't pass me up. He weaves back and forth looking for an open path to race up to the next red light. And when I'm stopped at a red light, the guy behind sits right on my rear bumper. If I move a couple inches ahead, he moves a couple inches ahead behind me. I just do it for kicks and move a few inches at a time to see what the guy behind will do. And there are a lot of drivers that sit in areas that say "Keep Clear". I wish the cops would give them a ticket.
One of these days you are going to try that trick with someone who has
an anger management problem and a sidearm.
I already did that a couple times. Some crazy woman pulled up beside me at a red light and spewed out all kinds of obscenities and then took off with her foot to the floor. She didn't have any idea how to improve gas mileage. and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
El Castor
2018-08-14 02:16:12 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Well, drivers around here are not polite. I drive a small pickup truck and everybody wants to pass me. It doesn't matter if I'm going 35 or 55, they have to pass me up and run to the next red light. Sometimes, I match my speed to the car in the next lane so the tailgater can't pass me up. He weaves back and forth looking for an open path to race up to the next red light. And when I'm stopped at a red light, the guy behind sits right on my rear bumper. If I move a couple inches ahead, he moves a couple inches ahead behind me. I just do it for kicks and move a few inches at a time to see what the guy behind will do. And there are a lot of drivers that sit in areas that say "Keep Clear". I wish the cops would give them a ticket.
One of these days you are going to try that trick with someone who has
an anger management problem and a sidearm.
I already did that a couple times. Some crazy woman pulled up beside me at a red light and spewed out all kinds of obscenities and then took off with her foot to the floor. She didn't have any idea how to improve gas mileage. and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
Tailgaters really piss me off. I give them a light tap on the brakes,
not enough to slow down, but a blink of the brake lights usually gets
them to back off. One evening a few years ago I was in the right lane
of the freeway, headed for the GG Bridge and San Francisco, when this
white van starts riding 5 feet off my bumper. He wouldn't back off.
Grrrr! So I gave him the tap and he starts fish tailing all over the
lane. Then (the good part) a red light turns on behind him. (-8
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-14 04:57:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by El Castor
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
One of these days you are going to try that trick with someone who has
an anger management problem and a sidearm.
I already did that a couple times. Some crazy woman pulled up beside me at a red light and spewed out all kinds of obscenities and then took off with her foot to the floor. She didn't have any idea how to improve gas mileage. and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
Tailgaters really piss me off. I give them a light tap on the brakes,
not enough to slow down, but a blink of the brake lights usually gets
them to back off. One evening a few years ago I was in the right lane
of the freeway, headed for the GG Bridge and San Francisco, when this
white van starts riding 5 feet off my bumper. He wouldn't back off.
Grrrr! So I gave him the tap and he starts fish tailing all over the
lane. Then (the good part) a red light turns on behind him. (-8
It's getting worse for people who want to renew their driver's license. My license expires next year and I expect to spend 8 hours standing in line and I can only stand up for 15 minutes. It's all these illegal aliens getting drivers licenses clogging up the line. Why don't they just go home and leave us alone?
El Castor
2018-08-14 07:37:03 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
One of these days you are going to try that trick with someone who has
an anger management problem and a sidearm.
I already did that a couple times. Some crazy woman pulled up beside me at a red light and spewed out all kinds of obscenities and then took off with her foot to the floor. She didn't have any idea how to improve gas mileage. and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
Tailgaters really piss me off. I give them a light tap on the brakes,
not enough to slow down, but a blink of the brake lights usually gets
them to back off. One evening a few years ago I was in the right lane
of the freeway, headed for the GG Bridge and San Francisco, when this
white van starts riding 5 feet off my bumper. He wouldn't back off.
Grrrr! So I gave him the tap and he starts fish tailing all over the
lane. Then (the good part) a red light turns on behind him. (-8
It's getting worse for people who want to renew their driver's license. My license expires next year and I expect to spend 8 hours standing in line and I can only stand up for 15 minutes. It's all these illegal aliens getting drivers licenses clogging up the line. Why don't they just go home and leave us alone?
You can make an appointment on the Internet. That should help. Last
time I did it I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Waited too
long and tried to get an appointment at the local office. No way. Had
to go across the bay and stand in line for 2 or 3 hours. Think I was
the only one in that line that didn't have 20 or 30 tattoos. But we
all had one thing in common, we were worried about the test. BTW -- if
you will be taking a written test and have a smart phone or tablet,
there is an app from an outfit called Deedal Studios. For a couple of
bucks they have 450 (or thereabouts) multiple choice questions from
the California DMV that you can practice on. Spend some time with that
and you're almost guaranteed to pass.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-14 16:11:59 UTC
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Post by El Castor
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
One of these days you are going to try that trick with someone who has
an anger management problem and a sidearm.
I already did that a couple times. Some crazy woman pulled up beside me at a red light and spewed out all kinds of obscenities and then took off with her foot to the floor. She didn't have any idea how to improve gas mileage. and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
Tailgaters really piss me off. I give them a light tap on the brakes,
not enough to slow down, but a blink of the brake lights usually gets
them to back off. One evening a few years ago I was in the right lane
of the freeway, headed for the GG Bridge and San Francisco, when this
white van starts riding 5 feet off my bumper. He wouldn't back off.
Grrrr! So I gave him the tap and he starts fish tailing all over the
lane. Then (the good part) a red light turns on behind him. (-8
It's getting worse for people who want to renew their driver's license. My license expires next year and I expect to spend 8 hours standing in line and I can only stand up for 15 minutes. It's all these illegal aliens getting drivers licenses clogging up the line. Why don't they just go home and leave us alone?
You can make an appointment on the Internet. That should help. Last
time I did it I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Waited too
long and tried to get an appointment at the local office. No way. Had
to go across the bay and stand in line for 2 or 3 hours. Think I was
the only one in that line that didn't have 20 or 30 tattoos. But we
all had one thing in common, we were worried about the test. BTW -- if
you will be taking a written test and have a smart phone or tablet,
there is an app from an outfit called Deedal Studios. For a couple of
bucks they have 450 (or thereabouts) multiple choice questions from
the California DMV that you can practice on. Spend some time with that
and you're almost guaranteed to pass.
I'm worried about the eye test. I lost 30% vision in one eye and I can't see out of the other. I can see fairly clearly in bright sunlight, but if I go inside, I can't read the time of day on the wall clock for several minutes. Last time I was in the DMV I studied the eye tests on the walls so I would know the answers. A 84 year old friend of mine needed to renew his license and asked me to do some research so he could study for the test. He's the same guy who is worth a million dollars and won't turn on his air conditioner because it costs $100 a week. And he won't use the internet because he thinks everybody will be spying on him. He's pretty good at electronics and designs some compact, high gain, efficient radio antennas. He taught me how to make a loop antenna for my AM radio which gives excellent results. And he taught me how to make a circuit board without using any etching chemicals or wasting any copper on the board. He's an interesting guy who dropped out of high school in 11th grade and never graduated and is proud of it and is worth a million today. We both share our dislike of the English language. Anyway, I found a few websites with questions and answers to the diving test and printed it all out so he could study for the test and he only missed one question.
El Castor
2018-08-14 17:55:21 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
One of these days you are going to try that trick with someone who has
an anger management problem and a sidearm.
I already did that a couple times. Some crazy woman pulled up beside me at a red light and spewed out all kinds of obscenities and then took off with her foot to the floor. She didn't have any idea how to improve gas mileage. and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
Tailgaters really piss me off. I give them a light tap on the brakes,
not enough to slow down, but a blink of the brake lights usually gets
them to back off. One evening a few years ago I was in the right lane
of the freeway, headed for the GG Bridge and San Francisco, when this
white van starts riding 5 feet off my bumper. He wouldn't back off.
Grrrr! So I gave him the tap and he starts fish tailing all over the
lane. Then (the good part) a red light turns on behind him. (-8
It's getting worse for people who want to renew their driver's license. My license expires next year and I expect to spend 8 hours standing in line and I can only stand up for 15 minutes. It's all these illegal aliens getting drivers licenses clogging up the line. Why don't they just go home and leave us alone?
You can make an appointment on the Internet. That should help. Last
time I did it I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Waited too
long and tried to get an appointment at the local office. No way. Had
to go across the bay and stand in line for 2 or 3 hours. Think I was
the only one in that line that didn't have 20 or 30 tattoos. But we
all had one thing in common, we were worried about the test. BTW -- if
you will be taking a written test and have a smart phone or tablet,
there is an app from an outfit called Deedal Studios. For a couple of
bucks they have 450 (or thereabouts) multiple choice questions from
the California DMV that you can practice on. Spend some time with that
and you're almost guaranteed to pass.
I'm worried about the eye test. I lost 30% vision in one eye and I can't see out of the other. I can see fairly clearly in bright sunlight, but if I go inside, I can't read the time of day on the wall clock for several minutes. Last time I was in the DMV I studied the eye tests on the walls so I would know the answers. A 84 year old friend of mine needed to renew his license and asked me to do some research so he could study for the test. He's the same guy who is worth a million dollars and won't turn on his air conditioner because it costs $100 a week. And he won't use the internet because he thinks everybody will be spying on him. He's pretty good at electronics and designs some compact, high gain, efficient radio antennas. He taught me how to make a loop antenna for my AM radio which gives excellent results. And he taught me how to make a circuit board without using any etching chemicals or wasting any copper on the board. He's an interesting guy who dropped out of high school in
11th grade and never graduated and is proud of it and is worth a million today. We both share our dislike of the English language. Anyway, I found a few websites with questions and answers to the diving test and printed it all out so he could study for the test and he only missed one question.
I know a retired fireman who is basically blind in one eye, and was
when he joined the department. He passed the test using the same
technique -- memorized the chart. (-8
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-14 07:01:37 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Well, drivers around here are not polite. I drive a small pickup truck and everybody wants to pass me. It doesn't matter if I'm going 35 or 55, they have to pass me up and run to the next red light. Sometimes, I match my speed to the car in the next lane so the tailgater can't pass me up. He weaves back and forth looking for an open path to race up to the next red light. And when I'm stopped at a red light, the guy behind sits right on my rear bumper. If I move a couple inches ahead, he moves a couple inches ahead behind me. I just do it for kicks and move a few inches at a time to see what the guy behind will do. And there are a lot of drivers that sit in areas that say "Keep Clear". I wish the cops would give them a ticket.
One of these days you are going to try that trick with someone who has
an anger management problem and a sidearm.
I already did that a couple times. Some crazy woman pulled up beside me at a red light and spewed out all kinds of obscenities and then took off with her foot to the floor. She didn't have any idea how to improve gas mileage.
No doubt she was more interested in getting where she was going
as quickly as reasonable, than saving a few pennies on gas.
Post by b***@gmail.com
and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
I'm sure he didn't want to discuss it with you.

Today I was walking along Market for from the subway to home,
when a car stopped in the middle of a road, and a big guy got out
of the driver's side, leaving his door open. He ran back to a truck
stopped about two car lengths behind him and threatened the
driver of that truck, challenging him "You want a piece o' me?"
I didn't see what had happened to provoke that. After a brief
interval during which I didn't hear that truck driver (of a small
truck perhaps like yours) say anything, the angry guy walked
back to his car, and then drove off, followed at a discreet
distance by the truck.

There's a long stoplight at the intersection of Castro and
Market, so fortunately that didn't hold up any traffic even though
they were on San Francisco's "main street", Market Street.
There were no fisticuffs, but the guy yelling at the guy in his
truck looked like he could have taken on the great majority
of other guys successfully. I don't know why the animosity
started: I didn't see that part.

There is a street called "Main Street' but it's just another
downtown street. The traffic is bad downtown of course,
but downtown is easily accessible to me by streetcar or
subway, so I never drive there. Market Street doesn't have
the worst traffic in San Francisco by a long shot IMV. The
worst traffic IMV is on 19th Avenue, in "The Avenues"
South of Golden Gate Park, where the stressed-out
yuppies live. I hate driving on 19th Avenue.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-14 17:37:08 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
No doubt she was more interested in getting where she was going
as quickly as reasonable, than saving a few pennies on gas.
Post by b***@gmail.com
and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
I'm sure he didn't want to discuss it with you.
Today I was walking along Market for from the subway to home,
when a car stopped in the middle of a road, and a big guy got out
of the driver's side, leaving his door open. He ran back to a truck
stopped about two car lengths behind him and threatened the
driver of that truck, challenging him "You want a piece o' me?"
I didn't see what had happened to provoke that. After a brief
interval during which I didn't hear that truck driver (of a small
truck perhaps like yours) say anything, the angry guy walked
back to his car, and then drove off, followed at a discreet
distance by the truck.
There's a long stoplight at the intersection of Castro and
Market, so fortunately that didn't hold up any traffic even though
they were on San Francisco's "main street", Market Street.
There were no fisticuffs, but the guy yelling at the guy in his
truck looked like he could have taken on the great majority
of other guys successfully. I don't know why the animosity
started: I didn't see that part.
There is a street called "Main Street' but it's just another
downtown street. The traffic is bad downtown of course,
but downtown is easily accessible to me by streetcar or
subway, so I never drive there. Market Street doesn't have
the worst traffic in San Francisco by a long shot IMV. The
worst traffic IMV is on 19th Avenue, in "The Avenues"
South of Golden Gate Park, where the stressed-out
yuppies live. I hate driving on 19th Avenue.
I can't relate to SF. All I remember is Market street and the cable cars. But around here I try to avoid the streets with apartment buildings since there are 3 families living in every apartment and park the 2 extra cars on the street. I can sort of miss the cars if I drive right next to the line. But I feel safer if I use the left lane without the cars. And then I get tailgated. Where I live, they issued parking permits that have to be in your window or they will tow your car away. I think if I wanted to start a small business, it would be towing cars out of un-authorized (sp) places and charging a couple hundred for the service.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-14 22:46:53 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
No doubt she was more interested in getting where she was going
as quickly as reasonable, than saving a few pennies on gas.
Post by b***@gmail.com
and there was another guy who yelled at me to learn how to drive and then did a fast left turn so I couldn't engage him in conversation. I really wanted to discuss it. All I was doing was leaving a few extra car lengths ahead so I had plenty of time to stop. I was going the same speed as the other cars but he wanted me to tailgate the car ahead within 6 inches and I don't do that. I'm too old for that stuff.
I'm sure he didn't want to discuss it with you.
Today I was walking along Market for from the subway to home,
when a car stopped in the middle of a road, and a big guy got out
of the driver's side, leaving his door open. He ran back to a truck
stopped about two car lengths behind him and threatened the
driver of that truck, challenging him "You want a piece o' me?"
I didn't see what had happened to provoke that. After a brief
interval during which I didn't hear that truck driver (of a small
truck perhaps like yours) say anything, the angry guy walked
back to his car, and then drove off, followed at a discreet
distance by the truck.
There's a long stoplight at the intersection of Castro and
Market, so fortunately that didn't hold up any traffic even though
they were on San Francisco's "main street", Market Street.
There were no fisticuffs, but the guy yelling at the guy in his
truck looked like he could have taken on the great majority
of other guys successfully. I don't know why the animosity
started: I didn't see that part.
There is a street called "Main Street' but it's just another
downtown street. The traffic is bad downtown of course,
but downtown is easily accessible to me by streetcar or
subway, so I never drive there. Market Street doesn't have
the worst traffic in San Francisco by a long shot IMV. The
worst traffic IMV is on 19th Avenue, in "The Avenues"
South of Golden Gate Park, where the stressed-out
yuppies live. I hate driving on 19th Avenue.
I can't relate to SF. All I remember is Market street and the cable cars. But around here I try to avoid the streets with apartment buildings since there are 3 families living in every apartment and park the 2 extra cars on the street. I can sort of miss the cars if I drive right next to the line. But I feel safer if I use the left lane without the cars. And then I get tailgated. Where I live, they issued parking permits that have to be in your window or they will tow your car away. I think if I wanted to start a small business, it would be towing cars out of un-authorized (sp) places and charging a couple hundred for the service.
In some parts of San Francisco, there doubtless are
3 families per apartment, but not in my neighborhood,
praise Jesus. Parking is a bitch, though it's nothing
like Noo Yawk. I can almost always find a spot within
two blocks, but I do have to drive around sometimes.

If you wanted to park on Market Street, I guess
you'd be out of luck. I walk on Market Street a lot,
and it doesn't seem there are many open parking
spots but I haven't done a study. Any commercial
district, such as Castro from 17th to 19th just
four short blocks down from me, or the Mission
District, or (God Help You) downtown, is going to
be really tough. Parking in Old Chinatown is just
about impossible. Parking in New Chinatown is
a lot better but that's because I know a few places
to go. I wouldn't attempt to park anywhere near
the North Beach/Fisherman's Wharf tourist trap,
but I wouldn't attempt to drive there either.
Both streetcar lines end at Fisherman's wharf,
though on megatourist days your best bet is to
walk a few blocks to where you can catch the
Van Ness street bus, rather than fight the
crowds to get on a streetcar. If it's a nice day
the best way to get from the Embarcadero
to Fisherman's wharf is to walk along the
Bay shore, though most of the view of the
Bay is blocked by a series of "Piers" which
are buildings and not just piers.

https://tinyurl.com/yblncfpx

Unlike the cable cars, the streetcars don't
cost you your first-born to ride. They're
part of the regular bus system, but that's
expensive unless you're a resident old geezer
like me, who can ride for free. They cost
$2.75 for 90 minutes now (soon to be for
two hours which is a bit better). When
I first came to San Fran, it cost a quarter
to ride the buses and that included the
cable cars.

My favourite streetcar is this one, which
used to be in Blackpool so my mom and
my aunts and maybe my grandparents
got to ride it while holidaying in Blackpool.
I haven't seen it for several years now,
so maybe it's only used for special
excursions now.
https://tinyurl.com/ybyowmf2
I don't know what that article is talking
about by saying it's "new", because I
rode it at least five years ago and
probably haven't even seen it for the
last three years.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-15 21:12:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
In some parts of San Francisco, there doubtless are
3 families per apartment, but not in my neighborhood,
praise Jesus. Parking is a bitch, though it's nothing
like Noo Yawk. I can almost always find a spot within
two blocks, but I do have to drive around sometimes.
If you wanted to park on Market Street, I guess
you'd be out of luck. I walk on Market Street a lot,
and it doesn't seem there are many open parking
spots but I haven't done a study. Any commercial
district, such as Castro from 17th to 19th just
four short blocks down from me, or the Mission
District, or (God Help You) downtown, is going to
be really tough. Parking in Old Chinatown is just
about impossible. Parking in New Chinatown is
a lot better but that's because I know a few places
to go. I wouldn't attempt to park anywhere near
the North Beach/Fisherman's Wharf tourist trap,
but I wouldn't attempt to drive there either.
Both streetcar lines end at Fisherman's wharf,
though on megatourist days your best bet is to
walk a few blocks to where you can catch the
Van Ness street bus, rather than fight the
crowds to get on a streetcar. If it's a nice day
the best way to get from the Embarcadero
to Fisherman's wharf is to walk along the
Bay shore, though most of the view of the
Bay is blocked by a series of "Piers" which
are buildings and not just piers.
https://tinyurl.com/yblncfpx
Unlike the cable cars, the streetcars don't
cost you your first-born to ride. They're
part of the regular bus system, but that's
expensive unless you're a resident old geezer
like me, who can ride for free. They cost
$2.75 for 90 minutes now (soon to be for
two hours which is a bit better). When
I first came to San Fran, it cost a quarter
to ride the buses and that included the
cable cars.
My favourite streetcar is this one, which
used to be in Blackpool so my mom and
my aunts and maybe my grandparents
got to ride it while holidaying in Blackpool.
I haven't seen it for several years now,
so maybe it's only used for special
excursions now.
https://tinyurl.com/ybyowmf2
I don't know what that article is talking
about by saying it's "new", because I
rode it at least five years ago and
probably haven't even seen it for the
last three years.
I recognize the wire on the top of the buses I guess they are still electric buses nowadays? Around here, we can ride the bus for 24 hours or until our senior pass expires at midnight for $1.50. I don't ride the bus much since I need my truck to carry heavy stuff to the swap meet. But I did ride the bus for 3 months when my Ford Van broke down and I needed a new truck. I wanted a new Ford Ranger but it took 3 months to find the one I wanted. And later I rode the bus to Jury Duty for a civil case lasting 4 weeks. My truck had a intermittent problem of not starting in hot weather so I didn't want to take any chances of not getting there or home. Turned out it was some silly security system installed by the dealer and all they had to do was put everything back the way the factory designed it and the problems went away.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-16 00:26:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
In some parts of San Francisco, there doubtless are
3 families per apartment, but not in my neighborhood,
praise Jesus. Parking is a bitch, though it's nothing
like Noo Yawk. I can almost always find a spot within
two blocks, but I do have to drive around sometimes.
If you wanted to park on Market Street, I guess
you'd be out of luck. I walk on Market Street a lot,
and it doesn't seem there are many open parking
spots but I haven't done a study. Any commercial
district, such as Castro from 17th to 19th just
four short blocks down from me, or the Mission
District, or (God Help You) downtown, is going to
be really tough. Parking in Old Chinatown is just
about impossible. Parking in New Chinatown is
a lot better but that's because I know a few places
to go. I wouldn't attempt to park anywhere near
the North Beach/Fisherman's Wharf tourist trap,
but I wouldn't attempt to drive there either.
Both streetcar lines end at Fisherman's wharf,
though on megatourist days your best bet is to
walk a few blocks to where you can catch the
Van Ness street bus, rather than fight the
crowds to get on a streetcar. If it's a nice day
the best way to get from the Embarcadero
to Fisherman's wharf is to walk along the
Bay shore, though most of the view of the
Bay is blocked by a series of "Piers" which
are buildings and not just piers.
https://tinyurl.com/yblncfpx
Unlike the cable cars, the streetcars don't
cost you your first-born to ride. They're
part of the regular bus system, but that's
expensive unless you're a resident old geezer
like me, who can ride for free. They cost
$2.75 for 90 minutes now (soon to be for
two hours which is a bit better). When
I first came to San Fran, it cost a quarter
to ride the buses and that included the
cable cars.
My favourite streetcar is this one, which
used to be in Blackpool so my mom and
my aunts and maybe my grandparents
got to ride it while holidaying in Blackpool.
I haven't seen it for several years now,
so maybe it's only used for special
excursions now.
https://tinyurl.com/ybyowmf2
I don't know what that article is talking
about by saying it's "new", because I
rode it at least five years ago and
probably haven't even seen it for the
last three years.
I recognize the wire on the top of the buses I guess they are still electric buses nowadays? Around here, we can ride the bus for 24 hours or until our senior pass expires at midnight for $1.50. I don't ride the bus much since I need my truck to carry heavy stuff to the swap meet. But I did ride the bus for 3 months when my Ford Van broke down and I needed a new truck. I wanted a new Ford Ranger but it took 3 months to find the one I wanted. And later I rode the bus to Jury Duty for a civil case lasting 4 weeks. My truck had a intermittent problem of not starting in hot weather so I didn't want to take any chances of not getting there or home. Turned out it was some silly security system installed by the dealer and all they had to do was put everything back the way the factory designed it and the problems went away.
We have some gasoline bus routes. I'd guess there
are more electric routes than gasoline, but there are
many parts of the city I rarely or never visit, so I
couldn't say for sure. There are some gasoline
buses (busses?) that run on Market Street, so the
rest of their routes must not have electric wires.

My senior pass never expires. San Francisco takes
good care of its geriatrics.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-11 04:57:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Well, drivers around here are not polite. I drive a small pickup truck and everybody wants to pass me. It doesn't matter if I'm going 35 or 55, they have to pass me up and run to the next red light. Sometimes, I match my speed to the car in the next lane so the tailgater can't pass me up. He weaves back and forth looking for an open path to race up to the next red light. And when I'm stopped at a red light, the guy behind sits right on my rear bumper. If I move a couple inches ahead, he moves a couple inches ahead behind me. I just do it for kicks and move a few inches at a time to see what the guy behind will do. And there are a lot of drivers that sit in areas that say "Keep Clear". I wish the cops would give them a ticket.
I hate to ride behind trucks that I can't see through or past,
because in that case I don't know what's going on ahead of
the pickup truck. I don't run into that problem much, because
if I'm on a freeway I can just switch lanes, and if I'm not on
a freeway I'm usually going shopping so I can just go up or
down a block to get onto a parallel road where the truck isn't.

You sound like the kind of view-blocking guy who's
exactly whom I'm talking about, in what you wrote! Worst
of all are the mobile homes, especially the ones that drive
on the narrow roads around Yosemite.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-12 14:16:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Well, drivers around here are not polite. I drive a small pickup truck and everybody wants to pass me. It doesn't matter if I'm going 35 or 55, they have to pass me up and run to the next red light. Sometimes, I match my speed to the car in the next lane so the tailgater can't pass me up. He weaves back and forth looking for an open path to race up to the next red light. And when I'm stopped at a red light, the guy behind sits right on my rear bumper. If I move a couple inches ahead, he moves a couple inches ahead behind me. I just do it for kicks and move a few inches at a time to see what the guy behind will do. And there are a lot of drivers that sit in areas that say "Keep Clear". I wish the cops would give them a ticket.
I hate to ride behind trucks that I can't see through or past,
because in that case I don't know what's going on ahead of
the pickup truck. I don't run into that problem much, because
if I'm on a freeway I can just switch lanes, and if I'm not on
a freeway I'm usually going shopping so I can just go up or
down a block to get onto a parallel road where the truck isn't.
You sound like the kind of view-blocking guy who's
exactly whom I'm talking about, in what you wrote! Worst
of all are the mobile homes, especially the ones that drive
on the narrow roads around Yosemite.
I have a little truck barely 5 feet wide. It's smaller than big cars and I can do a U turn on any street. It's a 6 cylinder, 5 speed manual shift and rear end reduction so I can climb a hill at 30 degrees in low gear. It's raised and has 17 inch tires. It's the most beautiful truck you have ever seen. One time I was stopped at a red light and the guy next to me wanted to buy my little truck and I said it was not for sale. The truck is named "Gabby" and I talk to her every time I go anywhere and thank her for getting me home and she did a good job.
El Castor
2018-08-11 06:19:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Well, drivers around here are not polite. I drive a small pickup truck and everybody wants to pass me. It doesn't matter if I'm going 35 or 55, they have to pass me up and run to the next red light. Sometimes, I match my speed to the car in the next lane so the tailgater can't pass me up. He weaves back and forth looking for an open path to race up to the next red light. And when I'm stopped at a red light, the guy behind sits right on my rear bumper. If I move a couple inches ahead, he moves a couple inches ahead behind me. I just do it for kicks and move a few inches at a time to see what the guy behind will do. And there are a lot of drivers that sit in areas that say "Keep Clear". I wish the cops would give them a ticket.
These days 101 going north is very heavy after 2:00 or 2:30. Jackasses
will get onto an off ramp lane, zoom ahead, and at the last instant
swerve over a solid double line back onto the freeway. Happens all the
time. Grrrr.
islander
2018-08-11 04:18:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 22:05:42 -0700 (PDT), b flanier
Post by b flanier
,... if you'll excuse my use of the word
Post by rumpelstiltskin
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
if you will excuse me, Rumpel, for talking in your face, "bruited"
(usually followed by "about") just simply means "spread" which, if
not confused with mayo, is pretty simple and much more recognized
than the somewhat pretentious "bruited".
To me it implies considerably more active interaction
than merely "spread". Maybe that's just me.
Post by b flanier
Don't get me wrong- I like "bruited" -it indicates the bruiter
has more than a 900 word vocabulary and baffles the bruitee.
Bye the bye, "bruited" also has a medical meaning which is the abnormal
sound heard within the body during auscultation, esp a heart murmur.
I didn't know that, though I did have a heart
murmur, which eventually developed into a
need for a heart-valve replacement. The
need was apparent to me in the first week
of last September, though it was about four
months later before I was scheduled for the
replacement operation. I was in almost as
good health as a 20-year-old before last
September, but I've definitely been not what
I used to be since then.
In California now, there's a lot of
brouhaha about the new "Real ID" (which
unfortunately is also a passport to get into
some stupid online gaming/social site).
This is coming to a head in California now,
with throngs of people waiting in line at
the DMV for eight hours then having to
come back again. This "real ID" was
propagandized in 2005 when the
congressional geniuses (please forgive
the contradiction in terms) said it would
help prevent terrorism, though it does
nothing of the sort. It does create a
huge burden on the people though,
and on the DMV which is charged with
issuing the "real ID" though it has
nowhere near the staff it would need to
do that efficiently. I read that it's hard
to get a "real ID" without a US passport,
but I don't have a US passport, nor do
38% of native-born Americans. My
British passport is way out of date, since
I haven't been out of the USA since 1999.
Half the States who have addressed the
requirements of the 2005 law have
refused to comply, but as 2020
approaches, one won't be able to get
on an airplane even for domestic
flights, or enter a Federal Building, or
blow one's nose, without a "real ID".
I've been reading that, rather than
increasing personal security, the
statute significantly decreases it, since
it assembles so much data, including
financial data, into one place that it's
a dream-scenario for computer
hackers.
If this is a nightmare for native-
born US citizens, just imagine what it
will be for me as a British National.
Maybe I'll get lucky and die before I
have to deal with that new Byzantine
monolith of bureaucracy.
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Words to live by!
El Castor
2018-08-11 06:29:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by rumpelstiltskin
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 22:05:42 -0700 (PDT), b flanier
Post by b flanier
,... if you'll excuse my use of the word
Post by rumpelstiltskin
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
if you will excuse me, Rumpel, for talking in your face, "bruited"
(usually followed by "about") just simply means "spread" which, if
not confused with mayo, is pretty simple and much more recognized
than the somewhat pretentious "bruited".
To me it implies considerably more active interaction
than merely "spread". Maybe that's just me.
Post by b flanier
Don't get me wrong- I like "bruited" -it indicates the bruiter
has more than a 900 word vocabulary and baffles the bruitee.
Bye the bye, "bruited" also has a medical meaning which is the abnormal
sound heard within the body during auscultation, esp a heart murmur.
I didn't know that, though I did have a heart
murmur, which eventually developed into a
need for a heart-valve replacement. The
need was apparent to me in the first week
of last September, though it was about four
months later before I was scheduled for the
replacement operation. I was in almost as
good health as a 20-year-old before last
September, but I've definitely been not what
I used to be since then.
In California now, there's a lot of
brouhaha about the new "Real ID" (which
unfortunately is also a passport to get into
some stupid online gaming/social site).
This is coming to a head in California now,
with throngs of people waiting in line at
the DMV for eight hours then having to
come back again. This "real ID" was
propagandized in 2005 when the
congressional geniuses (please forgive
the contradiction in terms) said it would
help prevent terrorism, though it does
nothing of the sort. It does create a
huge burden on the people though,
and on the DMV which is charged with
issuing the "real ID" though it has
nowhere near the staff it would need to
do that efficiently. I read that it's hard
to get a "real ID" without a US passport,
but I don't have a US passport, nor do
38% of native-born Americans. My
British passport is way out of date, since
I haven't been out of the USA since 1999.
Half the States who have addressed the
requirements of the 2005 law have
refused to comply, but as 2020
approaches, one won't be able to get
on an airplane even for domestic
flights, or enter a Federal Building, or
blow one's nose, without a "real ID".
I've been reading that, rather than
increasing personal security, the
statute significantly decreases it, since
it assembles so much data, including
financial data, into one place that it's
a dream-scenario for computer
hackers.
If this is a nightmare for native-
born US citizens, just imagine what it
will be for me as a British National.
Maybe I'll get lucky and die before I
have to deal with that new Byzantine
monolith of bureaucracy.
A few years ago, I decided to get the enhanced driver's license in
Washington State which would allow me to cross the border to Canada
without a passport. OK, it cost more than a regular driver's license
($85), especially if one assembles the necessary paperwork to assure the
DMV that I am really a citizen. (I had to order an official copy of my
birth certificate at a cost of $33.) So, my wife and I both got the
enhanced driver's license, but have since decided that we may travel a
bit further abroad, so we applied for new passports (ours had long since
expired). Mine appeared in the mail not long after I applied, but my
wife entered bureaucratic hell, primarily because as a woman she changed
her name. This went on for several months as she sent in more and more
copies of utility bills, marriage certificates, tax returns, etc. She
finally got the passport, but now is not so sure that she wants to
travel abroad because of her health. Maybe we'll just move to Canada.
It has been quite a few years, but driving in Canada was an
educational experience. Canadians are polite to a fault -- actually,
not a fault. As the traffic on 101 gets increasingly worse, and
California drivers more maniacal, I think back to Canada and try to
slow down an let someone turn or get into the lane. Oh, and great
trout fishing, too.
Words to live by!
About a month ago I was picking up my wife at the airport, and was in
the right lane of a one way two lane road in an enclosed parking
structure at SFO. A car loaded with a family was trying to exit the
parking area into my lane, so I slowed down to let them in and a cab
rear ended me. No good deed goes unpunished. (-8
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-10 10:50:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
Esperanto comes to mind. It was supposed to become the
universal language, easier than most languages to master.
Where is it now? In the dustbin someplace.
Humans make their languages the way they do for good
reason, I guess, but don't ask me what that reason is.
Most of us don't want something simple, I suppose. We
want something that helps define who we are. Or at least
that's what I was told by a certain young man from
Nantucket about whose astonishing accomplishments
much has been bruited, if you'll excuse my use of the word
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
I had to look up bruited and I think Nantucket refers to: "There once was a man from Nantucket who had such a long thing he could suck it...etc.". When I was a kid, I used to watch a TV show called "The 64,000 dollar question". And one of the questions was how to spell (Antidisestablishmentarianism) and my spell checker says it's wrong. I remember learning to spell it when I was 10 or 11 but never knew what it meant. Silly English language.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-10 12:16:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
Esperanto comes to mind. It was supposed to become the
universal language, easier than most languages to master.
Where is it now? In the dustbin someplace.
Humans make their languages the way they do for good
reason, I guess, but don't ask me what that reason is.
Most of us don't want something simple, I suppose. We
want something that helps define who we are. Or at least
that's what I was told by a certain young man from
Nantucket about whose astonishing accomplishments
much has been bruited, if you'll excuse my use of the word
"bruited", which is a very useful one really, IMV, since it
expresses something clearly which would otherwise require
more words.
I had to look up bruited and I think Nantucket refers to: "There once was a man from Nantucket who had such a long thing he could suck it...etc.". When I was a kid, I used to watch a TV show called "The 64,000 dollar question". And one of the questions was how to spell (Antidisestablishmentarianism) and my spell checker says it's wrong. I remember learning to spell it when I was 10 or 11 but never knew what it meant. Silly English language.
Antidisestablishmentarianism is easier to spell than most
long words, because it's spelt exactly as it sounds. A word
like "Weltanschauung" is much harder for Angloscribes.
(I just made that last word up.)

If you parse out "antidisestablishmentarianism" you get
"Opposition to removing the established common
Weltanschauung". The word was created to defame
those who wanted to get rid of hoary old religious ideas
that had become ridiculous even to religious people,
except for the antidisestablishmentarianists who wanted
to preserve the ancient customs, for the same reason
Islamic fathers feel they should have the right to beat
their daughters into submitting to marry somebody they
don't want to marry, or ancient Roman fathers to
practice "paterfamilias" meaning they can do anything
they wanted with their own children, including killing
them.

https://tinyurl.com/y8thengw


Anyhow, thanks for diverting my attention for a
moment from my desperate fear of the "real ID"
bureaucratic nightmare that looks like it's bubbling up
in California now. If our governor (Jerry Brown -
fourth term) wants to be remembered as a friend of
humanity, one thing he could do would be to join the
other governors who are resisting complying with
the federal "real ID" legislation.
islander
2018-08-10 14:11:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
I don't think that you have thought this through (or else you are
kidding). There are nearly a million unique words in the English
language, so your acronym approach would not come close to covering the
entire language. In fact, it wouldn't even cover the works of
Shakespeare who used 33,000 words in his plays. Most college educated
speakers of English have a vocabulary in the tens of thousands of words.
So, vocabulary is important and the size of your vocabulary correlates
to the amount of money that you earn in your lifetime according to the
Johnson O'Conner Research Foundation. Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-10 18:25:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
I don't think that you have thought this through (or else you are
kidding). There are nearly a million unique words in the English
language, so your acronym approach would not come close to covering the
entire language. In fact, it wouldn't even cover the works of
Shakespeare who used 33,000 words in his plays. Most college educated
speakers of English have a vocabulary in the tens of thousands of words.
So, vocabulary is important and the size of your vocabulary correlates
to the amount of money that you earn in your lifetime according to the
Johnson O'Conner Research Foundation. Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
I once wrote a test procedure for a pulse generator on a single piece of paper. The service manual instructions were written on several pages (I forget how many). My idea was simple and was just a chart with the various generator settings across the top of the page and the step number along the vertical axis. A typical test step would just indicate Frequency range, vernier setting (max, min), pulse width (max,min), rise time, fall time, amplitude, offset, and the actual desired result within a tolerance using a scope or counter. My boss didn't like it since it was only a single piece of paper and he had several filing cabinets full of useless paper. So he had to forward the idea to quality control who liked the idea. It saved time. Bottom line is, the more words and paper you can get rid of, the more efficient life becomes.
islander
2018-08-11 04:06:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
I don't think that you have thought this through (or else you are
kidding). There are nearly a million unique words in the English
language, so your acronym approach would not come close to covering the
entire language. In fact, it wouldn't even cover the works of
Shakespeare who used 33,000 words in his plays. Most college educated
speakers of English have a vocabulary in the tens of thousands of words.
So, vocabulary is important and the size of your vocabulary correlates
to the amount of money that you earn in your lifetime according to the
Johnson O'Conner Research Foundation. Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
I once wrote a test procedure for a pulse generator on a single piece of paper. The service manual instructions were written on several pages (I forget how many). My idea was simple and was just a chart with the various generator settings across the top of the page and the step number along the vertical axis. A typical test step would just indicate Frequency range, vernier setting (max, min), pulse width (max,min), rise time, fall time, amplitude, offset, and the actual desired result within a tolerance using a scope or counter. My boss didn't like it since it was only a single piece of paper and he had several filing cabinets full of useless paper. So he had to forward the idea to quality control who liked the idea. It saved time. Bottom line is, the more words and paper you can get rid of, the more efficient life becomes.
Not necessarily. At one time there was a lot of competition among
computer programmers to see who could write the smallest code,
especially if other programmers could not figure out how it worked.
Personally, I hated this game, not because I couldn't think up clever
code, but because it ignored the most fundamental rule in computer
engineering. That is that code needs to be maintained and there is an
art to writing code that is easy to read and easy to maintain. Maybe
not as much fun, but we are really not in this business to just have
fun. The objective is to create quality code.

Having said that, your example reminded me of a piece of code that I
once wrote as part of syntax analysis in a compiler. It consisted of a
state table and code that read the input and followed what is acceptable
context in the state table. I thought that it was pretty clever and it
turns out that the approach is used in most compilers.

The best code that I ever wrote was a circuit simulator back in '67.
That code survived for 20 years with several other people adding to it
over time. It was fast and well documented.

So, less is not always best. It really depends on what the purpose is.
In your example, it sounds like you hit the sweet spot of easy to use
and brief based on the feedback that you got from quality control.

One more example. The federal government has what is supposed to be
paper minimization. There was even legislation requiring it. The
result was an attempt to minimize the number of forms by making them as
general as possible. Success was assumed to be the reduction of the
number of forms. The result, however, was forms that were extremely
difficult to use because they were so general. It would have been much
better to more finely tune the forms to narrower application, even if
more forms were required.
b flanier
2018-08-11 06:33:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
... At one time there was a lot of competition among
computer programmers to see who could write the smallest code,...
Thinking back to the good 'ole days of computers", wasn't the problem
one of memory which caused the urge to be miserly with code?

Recall the doom that was predicted with the century change?

Aside from banks failing, the milk in the refer was going to sour,
and Jebus (that Bibblical guy) was going to throw such a curse
on coders they would all wind up flipping burgers. We now know
that only the latter came true.
islander
2018-08-11 13:20:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b flanier
... At one time there was a lot of competition among
computer programmers to see who could write the smallest code,...
Thinking back to the good 'ole days of computers", wasn't the problem
one of memory which caused the urge to be miserly with code?
Recall the doom that was predicted with the century change?
Aside from banks failing, the milk in the refer was going to sour,
and Jebus (that Bibblical guy) was going to throw such a curse
on coders they would all wind up flipping burgers. We now know
that only the latter came true.
It has been a long time since programmers had to be miserly with code.
As to the millennium crisis, it was real. I had a scientific calculator
that I had used for years, but it had the problem. A minor
inconvenience, but the problem of using only two bytes to store the date
in most business software was really serious. The problem required not
only the rewriting of a lot of code, but caused a serious compatibility
problem with old data. Fortunately the crisis was averted, but it took
a lot of people working hard to write new code.
b flanier
2018-08-11 21:53:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
It has been a long time since programmers had to be miserly with code.
<grin> May I remind you 15 years is not a LONG time especially
in terms of geological time!!
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-12 03:46:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 14:53:36 -0700 (PDT), b flanier
Post by b flanier
Post by islander
It has been a long time since programmers had to be miserly with code.
<grin> May I remind you 15 years is not a LONG time especially
in terms of geological time!!
I don't remember the dinosaurs, so I probably wasn't
alive then. The only time I have is mostly used up now.
I don't believe in gods or heavens or immortal souls, or
any of those feelgood lies, so
:
"You know how little time we have to stay,
and once departed, may return no more.”
-- from the Rubaiyat

Much as I would like to think of Mozart coming back,
or Pergolesi whom I'm completely certain would have
been one of the very greatest composers if he had
lived past barely 26, it ain't going to happen. The fire
starts, burns and grows for an uncertain time, then
goes out. There will be other fires, but not that one,
it's gone forever.

b***@gmail.com
2018-08-12 17:51:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b flanier
... At one time there was a lot of competition among
computer programmers to see who could write the smallest code,...
Thinking back to the good 'ole days of computers", wasn't the problem
one of memory which caused the urge to be miserly with code?
Recall the doom that was predicted with the century change?
Aside from banks failing, the milk in the refer was going to sour,
and Jebus (that Bibblical guy) was going to throw such a curse
on coders they would all wind up flipping burgers. We now know
that only the latter came true.
They wasted memory space with all the comments about what they were doing. If a line of code said X=2, they would explain it in detail why X=2 and wasted 10 times more memory space. We had a guy years ago who tried to write a test procedure in 32K memory and only got half way through it before running out of memory due to all his verbal crap. I had to delete most of his comments so I could finish the procedure and not have to do half of it manually. Like I said, English sucks.
islander
2018-08-12 19:32:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by b flanier
... At one time there was a lot of competition among
computer programmers to see who could write the smallest code,...
Thinking back to the good 'ole days of computers", wasn't the problem
one of memory which caused the urge to be miserly with code?
Recall the doom that was predicted with the century change?
Aside from banks failing, the milk in the refer was going to sour,
and Jebus (that Bibblical guy) was going to throw such a curse
on coders they would all wind up flipping burgers. We now know
that only the latter came true.
They wasted memory space with all the comments about what they were doing. If a line of code said X=2, they would explain it in detail why X=2 and wasted 10 times more memory space. We had a guy years ago who tried to write a test procedure in 32K memory and only got half way through it before running out of memory due to all his verbal crap. I had to delete most of his comments so I could finish the procedure and not have to do half of it manually. Like I said, English sucks.
The comments in any higher level language do not consume space or
performance in the object code produced by the compiler. There is not
any performance issue with comments.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-13 00:57:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by b flanier
... At one time there was a lot of competition among
computer programmers to see who could write the smallest code,...
Thinking back to the good 'ole days of computers", wasn't the problem
one of memory which caused the urge to be miserly with code?
Recall the doom that was predicted with the century change?
Aside from banks failing, the milk in the refer was going to sour,
and Jebus (that Bibblical guy) was going to throw such a curse
on coders they would all wind up flipping burgers. We now know
that only the latter came true.
They wasted memory space with all the comments about what they were doing. If a line of code said X=2, they would explain it in detail why X=2 and wasted 10 times more memory space. We had a guy years ago who tried to write a test procedure in 32K memory and only got half way through it before running out of memory due to all his verbal crap. I had to delete most of his comments so I could finish the procedure and not have to do half of it manually. Like I said, English sucks.
The comments in any higher level language do not consume space or
performance in the object code produced by the compiler. There is not
any performance issue with comments.
It was interpreted Basic running on a HP 9845 or something like that. No compiled version. All you had to do was type LIST and all the comments were there (in Memory). But I did make other changes. I don't think he had a single FOR-NEXT loop anywhere and wrote everything with just literal statements. Another problem was we were using a Fluke DMM for test while also manufacturing our own DMMs. The president didn't like that idea and insisted we use our own instruments to test our own products.
islander
2018-08-13 02:32:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by b flanier
... At one time there was a lot of competition among
computer programmers to see who could write the smallest code,...
Thinking back to the good 'ole days of computers", wasn't the problem
one of memory which caused the urge to be miserly with code?
Recall the doom that was predicted with the century change?
Aside from banks failing, the milk in the refer was going to sour,
and Jebus (that Bibblical guy) was going to throw such a curse
on coders they would all wind up flipping burgers. We now know
that only the latter came true.
They wasted memory space with all the comments about what they were doing. If a line of code said X=2, they would explain it in detail why X=2 and wasted 10 times more memory space. We had a guy years ago who tried to write a test procedure in 32K memory and only got half way through it before running out of memory due to all his verbal crap. I had to delete most of his comments so I could finish the procedure and not have to do half of it manually. Like I said, English sucks.
The comments in any higher level language do not consume space or
performance in the object code produced by the compiler. There is not
any performance issue with comments.
It was interpreted Basic running on a HP 9845 or something like that. No compiled version. All you had to do was type LIST and all the comments were there (in Memory). But I did make other changes. I don't think he had a single FOR-NEXT loop anywhere and wrote everything with just literal statements. Another problem was we were using a Fluke DMM for test while also manufacturing our own DMMs. The president didn't like that idea and insisted we use our own instruments to test our own products.
That would explain it.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-17 01:35:48 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
It was interpreted Basic running on a HP 9845 or something like that. No compiled version. All you had to do was type LIST and all the comments were there (in Memory). But I did make other changes. I don't think he had a single FOR-NEXT loop anywhere and wrote everything with just literal statements. Another problem was we were using a Fluke DMM for test while also manufacturing our own DMMs. The president didn't like that idea and insisted we use our own instruments to test our own products.
That would explain it.
Here's a little assembly code I wrote to fix a problem of a crystal oscillator that wasn't exactly right in my digital clock timer. I could have experimented with various trimmer caps to get the frequency close but decided to just let the clock run for a month or so and then calculate the error in terms of 1 second over a several hour period. Turned out it was one second slow every 19 hours. So, the little assembly routine (Add_Second) adds one second every 19 hours. The main program increments the variable (LIMIT) every hour and then calls the Add_Second routine to see if the LIMIT of 19 has been reached. And if equal to 19 it increments the seconds by one second and sets LIMIT to zero. I think the accuracy is about 20 seconds per year. The little assembly routine is only 8 lines and the entire program runs on a PIC-16F628 in 1K of ROM memory and about 200 bytes of RAM. I love these little 18 pin PIC processors that only cost $2. And they don't consume much power and run on a battery for a year or more. Wish I had some of these 50 years ago.

Add_Second
incf LIMIT,f
movfw CORRECTION
xorwf LIMIT,0
btfss STATUS,2
return
incf SECONDS,f
clrf LIMIT
return

b***@gmail.com
2018-08-12 12:34:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Brain fart - that shudda been "FDIC".
I'm acronym-challenged. I usually can't
figure out what acronyms stand for, and
I often confuse one for another. That's
a big liability in the modern world, since
most communication these days is done
with acronyms. It makes me feel like
Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms.
I think I posted in another thread that the English language sucks and a good language could be used using 3 or less characters (Acronyms) from a group of 26 letters from A to Z. Thus you would have 26^3 + 26^2 + 26 = 18278 acronyms to say most anything. But I don't think Islander likes that idea. He likes fancy words that nobody else understands and has to look up with Google. I hate looking up words I have never heard before and trying to spell words I can say but can't spell. What a waste of time (WOT).
I don't think that you have thought this through (or else you are
kidding). There are nearly a million unique words in the English
language, so your acronym approach would not come close to covering the
entire language. In fact, it wouldn't even cover the works of
Shakespeare who used 33,000 words in his plays. Most college educated
speakers of English have a vocabulary in the tens of thousands of words.
So, vocabulary is important and the size of your vocabulary correlates
to the amount of money that you earn in your lifetime according to the
Johnson O'Conner Research Foundation. Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
I once wrote a test procedure for a pulse generator on a single piece of paper. The service manual instructions were written on several pages (I forget how many). My idea was simple and was just a chart with the various generator settings across the top of the page and the step number along the vertical axis. A typical test step would just indicate Frequency range, vernier setting (max, min), pulse width (max,min), rise time, fall time, amplitude, offset, and the actual desired result within a tolerance using a scope or counter. My boss didn't like it since it was only a single piece of paper and he had several filing cabinets full of useless paper. So he had to forward the idea to quality control who liked the idea. It saved time. Bottom line is, the more words and paper you can get rid of, the more efficient life becomes.
Not necessarily. At one time there was a lot of competition among
computer programmers to see who could write the smallest code,
especially if other programmers could not figure out how it worked.
Personally, I hated this game, not because I couldn't think up clever
code, but because it ignored the most fundamental rule in computer
engineering. That is that code needs to be maintained and there is an
art to writing code that is easy to read and easy to maintain. Maybe
not as much fun, but we are really not in this business to just have
fun. The objective is to create quality code.
Having said that, your example reminded me of a piece of code that I
once wrote as part of syntax analysis in a compiler. It consisted of a
state table and code that read the input and followed what is acceptable
context in the state table. I thought that it was pretty clever and it
turns out that the approach is used in most compilers.
The best code that I ever wrote was a circuit simulator back in '67.
That code survived for 20 years with several other people adding to it
over time. It was fast and well documented.
So, less is not always best. It really depends on what the purpose is.
In your example, it sounds like you hit the sweet spot of easy to use
and brief based on the feedback that you got from quality control.
One more example. The federal government has what is supposed to be
paper minimization. There was even legislation requiring it. The
result was an attempt to minimize the number of forms by making them as
general as possible. Success was assumed to be the reduction of the
number of forms. The result, however, was forms that were extremely
difficult to use because they were so general. It would have been much
better to more finely tune the forms to narrower application, even if
more forms were required.
The best code I ever wrote was for a $100,000 switching system with all kinds of plug-in relay modules. It had RF switching boards, power switching boards and signal switching boards. And the customer could specify some special board designed just for him. It was all relays connecting inputs to outputs. So, the job of the test procedure was to check one single connection and verify all other paths were open. And to measure the resistance of each path within a tollerence. I can't spell tollerence and I'm not going to look it up. Anyway, the program was a kludge but once it was compiled it only had to run once for each system since all the expected results were stored in a data file. So, we just had to run a simple program that issued commands to the IEEE bus and read the results from a data file. But I did screw up once and compiled data from a system that had a blown fuse so the only units that passed the subsequent tests were ones with a blown fuse. The good ones failed the test. I had to fix that problem.
b flanier
2018-08-12 20:56:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
...But I did screw up once and compiled data from a system that had a
blown fuse so the only units that passed the subsequent tests were
ones with a blown fuse. The good ones failed the test. I had to
fix that problem....

Now <that> is hilarious!!!! It is a good example of "No good code
goes unpunished" or something like that.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-10 19:07:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by islander
Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
Suppose everybody had a PhD? Would McDonald's still find workers to cook hamburgers? Actually, I'd take a job at MDs if I could stand up for more than 15 minutes.
islander
2018-08-11 04:15:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
Suppose everybody had a PhD? Would McDonald's still find workers to cook hamburgers? Actually, I'd take a job at MDs if I could stand up for more than 15 minutes.
No great loss as far as I'm concerned. I really dislike fast food, not
in the least because of the way they treat their workers.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-11 04:57:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
Suppose everybody had a PhD? Would McDonald's still find workers to cook hamburgers? Actually, I'd take a job at MDs if I could stand up for more than 15 minutes.
I just had a burger at Burger King near the Cable Car Turnaround
at Powell and Market. It was my third one in the last couple of
weeks. When my son was here, we were eating SuperDuper
burgers, usually from downtown, but the last time we had them
was on Market near Church Street. My son complained they
were undercooked, and I thought so too. Both of us being the way
we are, we'll likely not go to that location again. I had my first
Burger King bacon-cheese-burger in at least ten years while my
son was still here. He said it looked better than the Super-Duper
burgers. I agree, and that's why I've been going back. It was
cheaper too, about $7 instead of about $11.

I haven't eaten at McDonald's since Silent Cal was president,
although my 21-year-old nephew works at one in Massachusetts.
I guess I was ticked off partly because they fired the original
Ronald MacDonald after finding out he was gay. MacDonalds
was just watching its bottom line, since most of its clientele
is bigoted rednecks who don't cotton to fags at all. That
doesn't mean I have to patronize them myself, though.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-13 04:25:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
Suppose everybody had a PhD? Would McDonald's still find workers to cook hamburgers? Actually, I'd take a job at MDs if I could stand up for more than 15 minutes.
I just had a burger at Burger King near the Cable Car Turnaround
at Powell and Market. It was my third one in the last couple of
weeks. When my son was here, we were eating SuperDuper
burgers, usually from downtown, but the last time we had them
was on Market near Church Street. My son complained they
were undercooked, and I thought so too. Both of us being the way
we are, we'll likely not go to that location again. I had my first
Burger King bacon-cheese-burger in at least ten years while my
son was still here. He said it looked better than the Super-Duper
burgers. I agree, and that's why I've been going back. It was
cheaper too, about $7 instead of about $11.
I went there again today, and got fries too, this time. The
burger was as good as before, but I won't get the fries again.
What a disappointment they were! Totally bland, almost
tasteless. The clerk asked if I wanted catsup/ketchup but I
declined. The catsup/ketchup would have added some
flavour, but not the kind of flavour I'd desire. Vinegar wasn't
offered but even vinegar wouldn't have helped those fries
enough. The pigeons liked the fries just fine. They'll eat
anything, though they probably prefer "no condiments".

I'm getting more of a feel for what the heck a "condiment"
is than I had before, but I'm still not sure about salt and
pepper. I think those two are not considered "condiments".
I guess MSG isn't either, but what about Worcestershire
sauce?

Americans seem to be scared of MSG. The medical
propaganda machine has really worked them over about it.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-13 21:43:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
Suppose everybody had a PhD? Would McDonald's still find workers to cook hamburgers? Actually, I'd take a job at MDs if I could stand up for more than 15 minutes.
I just had a burger at Burger King near the Cable Car Turnaround
at Powell and Market. It was my third one in the last couple of
weeks. When my son was here, we were eating SuperDuper
burgers, usually from downtown, but the last time we had them
was on Market near Church Street. My son complained they
were undercooked, and I thought so too. Both of us being the way
we are, we'll likely not go to that location again. I had my first
Burger King bacon-cheese-burger in at least ten years while my
son was still here. He said it looked better than the Super-Duper
burgers. I agree, and that's why I've been going back. It was
cheaper too, about $7 instead of about $11.
I went there again today, and got fries too, this time. The
burger was as good as before, but I won't get the fries again.
What a disappointment they were! Totally bland, almost
tasteless. The clerk asked if I wanted catsup/ketchup but I
declined. The catsup/ketchup would have added some
flavour, but not the kind of flavour I'd desire. Vinegar wasn't
offered but even vinegar wouldn't have helped those fries
enough. The pigeons liked the fries just fine. They'll eat
anything, though they probably prefer "no condiments".
I'm getting more of a feel for what the heck a "condiment"
is than I had before, but I'm still not sure about salt and
pepper. I think those two are not considered "condiments".
I guess MSG isn't either, but what about Worcestershire
sauce?
Americans seem to be scared of MSG. The medical
propaganda machine has really worked them over about it.
MSG is contraversial (sp). I think it is supposed to be better than pure salt.
My father had high BP and was not supposed to eat any salt. I don't know if MSG was available in those days. Maybe he would have lived longer eating MSG rather than salt. But I love salt in my won-ton soup. It's the main ingredient. I wish I knew the others. I had some won-ton soup today and the waitress saw me coming and just asked if I wanted the usual stuff. So, I said yes and sat down at a table. But they don't do the best job so I brought along some chopped green onions and baby corn to add to the soup. I also brought a bottle of diet coke so I didn't have to order a drink. All I needed was a water glass to fill with ice.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor enhancer commonly added to Chinese food, canned vegetables, soups and processed meats. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified MSG as a food ingredient that's "generally recognized as safe," but its use remains controversial. For this reason, when MSG is added to food, the FDA requires that it be listed on the label.

MSG has been used as a food additive for decades. Over the years, the FDA has received many anecdotal reports of adverse reactions to foods containing MSG. These reactions — known as MSG symptom complex — include:

Headache
Flushing
Sweating
Facial pressure or tightness
Numbness, tingling or burning in the face, neck and other areas
Rapid, fluttering heartbeats (heart palpitations)
Chest pain
Nausea
Weakness

However, researchers have found no definitive evidence of a link between MSG and these symptoms. Researchers acknowledge, though, that a small percentage of people may have short-term reactions to MSG. Symptoms are usually mild and don't require treatment. The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-13 22:45:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by islander
Sadly, most people get by with
only 5,000 words in day-to-day conversation. Maybe that contributes to
so many people being stuck in dead-end jobs. But, poor vocabulary seems
to be the direction that things are going. In 1950 the average 14 year
old had a vocabulary of 25,000 words and in 1999 that had dropped to
10,000. Unfortunately, the President is not setting a good example. He
speaks at 4th to 5th grade level the lowest of any modern President.
Welcome to the world of Trump (WOT).
https://www.newsweek.com/trump-fire-and-fury-smart-genius-obama-774169
Suppose everybody had a PhD? Would McDonald's still find workers to cook hamburgers? Actually, I'd take a job at MDs if I could stand up for more than 15 minutes.
I just had a burger at Burger King near the Cable Car Turnaround
at Powell and Market. It was my third one in the last couple of
weeks. When my son was here, we were eating SuperDuper
burgers, usually from downtown, but the last time we had them
was on Market near Church Street. My son complained they
were undercooked, and I thought so too. Both of us being the way
we are, we'll likely not go to that location again. I had my first
Burger King bacon-cheese-burger in at least ten years while my
son was still here. He said it looked better than the Super-Duper
burgers. I agree, and that's why I've been going back. It was
cheaper too, about $7 instead of about $11.
I went there again today, and got fries too, this time. The
burger was as good as before, but I won't get the fries again.
What a disappointment they were! Totally bland, almost
tasteless. The clerk asked if I wanted catsup/ketchup but I
declined. The catsup/ketchup would have added some
flavour, but not the kind of flavour I'd desire. Vinegar wasn't
offered but even vinegar wouldn't have helped those fries
enough. The pigeons liked the fries just fine. They'll eat
anything, though they probably prefer "no condiments".
I'm getting more of a feel for what the heck a "condiment"
is than I had before, but I'm still not sure about salt and
pepper. I think those two are not considered "condiments".
I guess MSG isn't either, but what about Worcestershire
sauce?
Americans seem to be scared of MSG. The medical
propaganda machine has really worked them over about it.
MSG is contraversial (sp). I think it is supposed to be better than pure salt.
My father had high BP and was not supposed to eat any salt. I don't know if MSG was available in those days. Maybe he would have lived longer eating MSG rather than salt. But I love salt in my won-ton soup. It's the main ingredient. I wish I knew the others. I had some won-ton soup today and the waitress saw me coming and just asked if I wanted the usual stuff. So, I said yes and sat down at a table. But they don't do the best job so I brought along some chopped green onions and baby corn to add to the soup. I also brought a bottle of diet coke so I didn't have to order a drink. All I needed was a water glass to fill with ice.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor enhancer commonly added to Chinese food, canned vegetables, soups and processed meats. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified MSG as a food ingredient that's "generally recognized as safe," but its use remains controversial. For this reason, when MSG is added to food, the FDA requires that it be listed on the label.
Headache
Flushing
Sweating
Facial pressure or tightness
Numbness, tingling or burning in the face, neck and other areas
Rapid, fluttering heartbeats (heart palpitations)
Chest pain
Nausea
Weakness
However, researchers have found no definitive evidence of a link between MSG and these symptoms. Researchers acknowledge, though, that a small percentage of people may have short-term reactions to MSG. Symptoms are usually mild and don't require treatment. The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
I actually buy MSG to add to food. I have some on hand, though
it's been a while since I used any of it. Some people are surprised
when I tell them I buy MSG. There is (or was) a flavoring called
"Accent". It was pure MSG at first, but I thought they changed
the formula. I found it on Amazon and some of the people said
or implied that it was MSG in part or in whole. You can buy MSG
without the "Accent" brand name and price, but I've only seen it
for sale in the great (IMV) Chinese May Wah supermarket in
"New Chinatown (San Francisco) lately, on Clement Street near
8th Avenue. Not a good supermarket for general Anglo stuff but
great for Chinese stuff that's hard to find elsewhere.

I do remember buying MSG on Stockton Street easily.
Stockton Street is one street over from the "Old Chinatown"
tourist-trap street, on Grant Street between the gate at Bush
and Grant through Broadway and Grant. Here's the gate:
https://tinyurl.com/y7eltvgl

Stockton just one block closer to the ocean than Grant
is where the actual Chinese people shop for groceries. A lot
of the staff, even whole stores' worth, don't speak any English
at all, so you might end up using impromptu sign language.

I've never have a bad reaction to MSG, but I do have something
of a cast-iron stomach. People who have problems with salt
might have even bigger problems with MSG.
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-14 02:25:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
MSG is contraversial (sp). I think it is supposed to be better than pure salt.
My father had high BP and was not supposed to eat any salt. I don't know if MSG was available in those days. Maybe he would have lived longer eating MSG rather than salt. But I love salt in my won-ton soup. It's the main ingredient. I wish I knew the others. I had some won-ton soup today and the waitress saw me coming and just asked if I wanted the usual stuff. So, I said yes and sat down at a table. But they don't do the best job so I brought along some chopped green onions and baby corn to add to the soup. I also brought a bottle of diet coke so I didn't have to order a drink. All I needed was a water glass to fill with ice.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor enhancer commonly added to Chinese food, canned vegetables, soups and processed meats. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified MSG as a food ingredient that's "generally recognized as safe," but its use remains controversial. For this reason, when MSG is added to food, the FDA requires that it be listed on the label.
Headache
Flushing
Sweating
Facial pressure or tightness
Numbness, tingling or burning in the face, neck and other areas
Rapid, fluttering heartbeats (heart palpitations)
Chest pain
Nausea
Weakness
However, researchers have found no definitive evidence of a link between MSG and these symptoms. Researchers acknowledge, though, that a small percentage of people may have short-term reactions to MSG. Symptoms are usually mild and don't require treatment. The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
I actually buy MSG to add to food. I have some on hand, though
it's been a while since I used any of it. Some people are surprised
when I tell them I buy MSG. There is (or was) a flavoring called
"Accent". It was pure MSG at first, but I thought they changed
the formula. I found it on Amazon and some of the people said
or implied that it was MSG in part or in whole. You can buy MSG
without the "Accent" brand name and price, but I've only seen it
for sale in the great (IMV) Chinese May Wah supermarket in
"New Chinatown (San Francisco) lately, on Clement Street near
8th Avenue. Not a good supermarket for general Anglo stuff but
great for Chinese stuff that's hard to find elsewhere.
I do remember buying MSG on Stockton Street easily.
Stockton Street is one street over from the "Old Chinatown"
tourist-trap street, on Grant Street between the gate at Bush
https://tinyurl.com/y7eltvgl
Stockton just one block closer to the ocean than Grant
is where the actual Chinese people shop for groceries. A lot
of the staff, even whole stores' worth, don't speak any English
at all, so you might end up using impromptu sign language.
I've never have a bad reaction to MSG, but I do have something
of a cast-iron stomach. People who have problems with salt
might have even bigger problems with MSG.
I don't think I have any problems with salt or MSG. I take Lisinopril to get my BP down to 120. I haven't discussed salt or MSG with my doctor. He just looks at the test results and then tells me to quit drinking since some other results are too high. This time, I'm going to quit drinking for 20 days before the tests so my blood tests will indicate low BP and no other problems.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-08-14 03:33:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by b***@gmail.com
MSG is contraversial (sp). I think it is supposed to be better than pure salt.
My father had high BP and was not supposed to eat any salt. I don't know if MSG was available in those days. Maybe he would have lived longer eating MSG rather than salt. But I love salt in my won-ton soup. It's the main ingredient. I wish I knew the others. I had some won-ton soup today and the waitress saw me coming and just asked if I wanted the usual stuff. So, I said yes and sat down at a table. But they don't do the best job so I brought along some chopped green onions and baby corn to add to the soup. I also brought a bottle of diet coke so I didn't have to order a drink. All I needed was a water glass to fill with ice.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor enhancer commonly added to Chinese food, canned vegetables, soups and processed meats. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified MSG as a food ingredient that's "generally recognized as safe," but its use remains controversial. For this reason, when MSG is added to food, the FDA requires that it be listed on the label.
Headache
Flushing
Sweating
Facial pressure or tightness
Numbness, tingling or burning in the face, neck and other areas
Rapid, fluttering heartbeats (heart palpitations)
Chest pain
Nausea
Weakness
However, researchers have found no definitive evidence of a link between MSG and these symptoms. Researchers acknowledge, though, that a small percentage of people may have short-term reactions to MSG. Symptoms are usually mild and don't require treatment. The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
I actually buy MSG to add to food. I have some on hand, though
it's been a while since I used any of it. Some people are surprised
when I tell them I buy MSG. There is (or was) a flavoring called
"Accent". It was pure MSG at first, but I thought they changed
the formula. I found it on Amazon and some of the people said
or implied that it was MSG in part or in whole. You can buy MSG
without the "Accent" brand name and price, but I've only seen it
for sale in the great (IMV) Chinese May Wah supermarket in
"New Chinatown (San Francisco) lately, on Clement Street near
8th Avenue. Not a good supermarket for general Anglo stuff but
great for Chinese stuff that's hard to find elsewhere.
I do remember buying MSG on Stockton Street easily.
Stockton Street is one street over from the "Old Chinatown"
tourist-trap street, on Grant Street between the gate at Bush
https://tinyurl.com/y7eltvgl
Stockton just one block closer to the ocean than Grant
is where the actual Chinese people shop for groceries. A lot
of the staff, even whole stores' worth, don't speak any English
at all, so you might end up using impromptu sign language.
I've never have a bad reaction to MSG, but I do have something
of a cast-iron stomach. People who have problems with salt
might have even bigger problems with MSG.
I don't think I have any problems with salt or MSG. I take Lisinopril to get my BP down to 120. I haven't discussed salt or MSG with my doctor. He just looks at the test results and then tells me to quit drinking since some other results are too high. This time, I'm going to quit drinking for 20 days before the tests so my blood tests will indicate low BP and no other problems.
Kaiser scrupulously sends me my blood test results, but the
discussion is in such doctor-y terms that it means nothing to
me and the format is awkward with each test having its own
super-boring section. So I just depend on my doctor to look
at it and give me a heads-up if theres's anything important.

Of course, everything coming from Kaiser is an "important
message" according to Kaiser, even if it's just a tiresome
and tiresomely-formatted list of the pills and other expenses
that my insurance has paid.

I don't drink a lot so I never get a warning about drinking.
Now that you've brought it up though, I think I'll head for
the kitchen and make myself some hot-chocolate with
whiskey. I do ALWAYS have whiskey around, If I'm
anywhere near running out, I add it to my shopping list
more legibly than I write other stuff.
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