Discussion:
Gaddafi's fellow enablers: men like Tony Blair, Nicolas Sarkozy, Silvio Berlusconi, Gordon Brown, and even George W. Bush.
(too old to reply)
GLOBALIST
2011-03-07 21:37:01 UTC
Permalink
Can Buy Me Love
by Christopher Dickey


Christopher Dickey is a columnist for The Daily Beast and Newsweek
magazine's Paris bureau chief and Middle East editor. He is the author
of six books, including Summer of Deliverance, and most recently
Securing the City: Inside America's Best Counterterror Force—the NYPD.
====================

Before Libyans rose up against him, Muammar Gaddafi used money, and
well-timed diplomatic overtures, to worm his way into the West’s good
graces. In this week’s Newsweek, Christopher Dickey looks at how Bush,
Blair, and Berlusconi gave the brutal dictator a makeover.

The tale is a sordid one, but let’s at least begin in relatively
pleasant surroundings, among the leather armchairs of the Travellers
Club in London. Its rooms have been a favorite rendezvous since the
19th century for gentlemen of international intrigue—and it’s where
Libya’s urbane, white-haired spymaster, Musa Kusa, met with
representatives of the British and American intelligence services in
December 2003. Their purpose was to hammer out a deal to bring Kusa’s
boss, Muammar Gaddafi, in from the cold.

Prime Minister Tony Blairs meets with Colonel Muammar Qaddafi outside
Sirte, Libya on May 29, 2007. (Photo: Stefan Rousseau / AP Photo)
Kusa, now Libya’s foreign minister, affects none of the silly props
and pretenses—the tents and turbans and meandering rants—that have
become Gaddafi’s trademarks. He got his master’s degree at Michigan
State University in the 1970s, and both his children, born in the
United States, are American citizens. “He ought to understand our
ways,” says an American intelligence officer who dealt with him in the
1990s. And he does. It’s Kusa’s grasp of Western ways that has made
him so effective in his primary role as Gaddafi’s enabler, aiding and
abetting the Libyan leader’s pathological behavior. Kusa concocts
excuses, fends off consequences, comes up with compromises, and thus
far has managed to keep his kinsman in power no matter what crimes the
Libyan leader has committed against his own people or against the
world. But what’s really disturbing is the roster of world leaders he
helped to enlist as his fellow enablers: men like Tony Blair, Nicolas
Sarkozy, Silvio Berlusconi, Gordon Brown, and even George W. Bush.

How did they end up collaborating with the once and future
international pariah? The West’s reconciliation with Gaddafi
disconcerted even the likes of former CIA director George Tenet, whose
memoir, At the Center of the Storm, called the negotiations with Kusa
“illustrative of the surreal world in which we had to operate.”
According to Tenet, many in the agency actually suspected Kusa of
masterminding the 1988 bombing that blew Pan Am Flight 103 out of the
sky over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing 270 people. But by 2003, Western
intelligence services had grown as comfortable with Kusa’s proposals
as they were in the leather armchairs of the Travellers—and they
helped Western leaders feel that way, too.

The really critical moment of excess came in 2009. Abdelbaset al-
Megrahi, the sole Libyan intelligence officer convicted for the
Lockerbie bombing, was serving a life sentence in Scotland, but had
been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer, supposedly with three
months to live.
mg
2011-03-07 23:46:38 UTC
Permalink
 Can Buy Me Love
by Christopher Dickey
Christopher Dickey is a columnist for The Daily Beast and Newsweek
magazine's Paris bureau chief and Middle East editor. He is the author
of six books, including Summer of Deliverance, and most recently
Securing the City: Inside America's Best Counterterror Force—the NYPD.
====================
 Before Libyans rose up against him, Muammar Gaddafi used money, and
well-timed diplomatic overtures, to worm his way into the West’s good
graces. In this week’s Newsweek, Christopher Dickey looks at how Bush,
Blair, and Berlusconi gave the brutal dictator a makeover.
The tale is a sordid one, but let’s at least begin in relatively
pleasant surroundings, among the leather armchairs of the Travellers
Club in London. Its rooms have been a favorite rendezvous since the
19th century for gentlemen of international intrigue—and it’s where
Libya’s urbane, white-haired spymaster, Musa Kusa, met with
representatives of the British and American intelligence services in
December 2003. Their purpose was to hammer out a deal to bring Kusa’s
boss, Muammar Gaddafi, in from the cold.
 Prime Minister Tony Blairs meets with Colonel Muammar Qaddafi outside
Sirte, Libya on May 29, 2007. (Photo: Stefan Rousseau / AP Photo)
Kusa, now Libya’s foreign minister, affects none of the silly props
and pretenses—the tents and turbans and meandering rants—that have
become Gaddafi’s trademarks. He got his master’s degree at Michigan
State University in the 1970s, and both his children, born in the
United States, are American citizens. “He ought to understand our
ways,” says an American intelligence officer who dealt with him in the
1990s. And he does. It’s Kusa’s grasp of Western ways that has made
him so effective in his primary role as Gaddafi’s enabler, aiding and
abetting the Libyan leader’s pathological behavior. Kusa concocts
excuses, fends off consequences, comes up with compromises, and thus
far has managed to keep his kinsman in power no matter what crimes the
Libyan leader has committed against his own people or against the
world. But what’s really disturbing is the roster of world leaders he
helped to enlist as his fellow enablers: men like Tony Blair, Nicolas
Sarkozy, Silvio Berlusconi, Gordon Brown, and even George W. Bush.
How did they end up collaborating with the once and future
international pariah? The West’s reconciliation with Gaddafi
disconcerted even the likes of former CIA director George Tenet, whose
memoir, At the Center of the Storm, called the negotiations with Kusa
“illustrative of the surreal world in which we had to operate.”
According to Tenet, many in the agency actually suspected Kusa of
masterminding the 1988 bombing that blew Pan Am Flight 103 out of the
sky over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing 270 people. But by 2003, Western
intelligence services had grown as comfortable with Kusa’s proposals
as they were in the leather armchairs of the Travellers—and they
helped Western leaders feel that way, too.
The really critical moment of excess came in 2009. Abdelbaset al-
Megrahi, the sole Libyan intelligence officer convicted for the
Lockerbie bombing, was serving a life sentence in Scotland, but had
been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer, supposedly with three
months to live.
If you do a Google search on "Abdelbaset al-Megrahi" along with the
word "oil", it looks like Megrahi got out of jail because an oil
company (BP) wanted him out of jail.
El Castor
2011-03-08 01:27:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by mg
 Can Buy Me Love
by Christopher Dickey
Christopher Dickey is a columnist for The Daily Beast and Newsweek
magazine's Paris bureau chief and Middle East editor. He is the author
of six books, including Summer of Deliverance, and most recently
Securing the City: Inside America's Best Counterterror Force—the NYPD.
====================
 Before Libyans rose up against him, Muammar Gaddafi used money, and
well-timed diplomatic overtures, to worm his way into the West’s good
graces. In this week’s Newsweek, Christopher Dickey looks at how Bush,
Blair, and Berlusconi gave the brutal dictator a makeover.
The tale is a sordid one, but let’s at least begin in relatively
pleasant surroundings, among the leather armchairs of the Travellers
Club in London. Its rooms have been a favorite rendezvous since the
19th century for gentlemen of international intrigue—and it’s where
Libya’s urbane, white-haired spymaster, Musa Kusa, met with
representatives of the British and American intelligence services in
December 2003. Their purpose was to hammer out a deal to bring Kusa’s
boss, Muammar Gaddafi, in from the cold.
 Prime Minister Tony Blairs meets with Colonel Muammar Qaddafi outside
Sirte, Libya on May 29, 2007. (Photo: Stefan Rousseau / AP Photo)
Kusa, now Libya’s foreign minister, affects none of the silly props
and pretenses—the tents and turbans and meandering rants—that have
become Gaddafi’s trademarks. He got his master’s degree at Michigan
State University in the 1970s, and both his children, born in the
United States, are American citizens. “He ought to understand our
ways,” says an American intelligence officer who dealt with him in the
1990s. And he does. It’s Kusa’s grasp of Western ways that has made
him so effective in his primary role as Gaddafi’s enabler, aiding and
abetting the Libyan leader’s pathological behavior. Kusa concocts
excuses, fends off consequences, comes up with compromises, and thus
far has managed to keep his kinsman in power no matter what crimes the
Libyan leader has committed against his own people or against the
world. But what’s really disturbing is the roster of world leaders he
helped to enlist as his fellow enablers: men like Tony Blair, Nicolas
Sarkozy, Silvio Berlusconi, Gordon Brown, and even George W. Bush.
How did they end up collaborating with the once and future
international pariah? The West’s reconciliation with Gaddafi
disconcerted even the likes of former CIA director George Tenet, whose
memoir, At the Center of the Storm, called the negotiations with Kusa
“illustrative of the surreal world in which we had to operate.”
According to Tenet, many in the agency actually suspected Kusa of
masterminding the 1988 bombing that blew Pan Am Flight 103 out of the
sky over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing 270 people. But by 2003, Western
intelligence services had grown as comfortable with Kusa’s proposals
as they were in the leather armchairs of the Travellers—and they
helped Western leaders feel that way, too.
The really critical moment of excess came in 2009. Abdelbaset al-
Megrahi, the sole Libyan intelligence officer convicted for the
Lockerbie bombing, was serving a life sentence in Scotland, but had
been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer, supposedly with three
months to live.
If you do a Google search on "Abdelbaset al-Megrahi" along with the
word "oil", it looks like Megrahi got out of jail because an oil
company (BP) wanted him out of jail.
Barack Obama's favorite uncle, the Reverend Jeremiah Wright, in the
company of Louis Farrakhan, once visited their good friend Moamar
Gadaffi in his lair in Libya. Oops! I'm just absolutely sure they
never mentioned the visit to Barack Obama because he just didn't know!
He was never told!
mg
2011-03-08 11:26:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by El Castor
Post by mg
Post by GLOBALIST
Can Buy Me Love
by Christopher Dickey
Christopher Dickey is a columnist for The Daily Beast and Newsweek
magazine's Paris bureau chief and Middle East editor. He is the author
of six books, including Summer of Deliverance, and most recently
Securing the City: Inside America's Best Counterterror Force the NYPD.
====================
Before Libyans rose up against him, Muammar Gaddafi used money, and
well-timed diplomatic overtures, to worm his way into the West s good
graces. In this week s Newsweek, Christopher Dickey looks at how Bush,
Blair, and Berlusconi gave the brutal dictator a makeover.
The tale is a sordid one, but let s at least begin in relatively
pleasant surroundings, among the leather armchairs of the Travellers
Club in London. Its rooms have been a favorite rendezvous since the
19th century for gentlemen of international intrigue and it s where
Libya s urbane, white-haired spymaster, Musa Kusa, met with
representatives of the British and American intelligence services in
December 2003. Their purpose was to hammer out a deal to bring Kusa s
boss, Muammar Gaddafi, in from the cold.
Prime Minister Tony Blairs meets with Colonel Muammar Qaddafi outside
Sirte, Libya on May 29, 2007. (Photo: Stefan Rousseau / AP Photo)
Kusa, now Libya s foreign minister, affects none of the silly props
and pretenses the tents and turbans and meandering rants that have
become Gaddafi s trademarks. He got his master s degree at Michigan
State University in the 1970s, and both his children, born in the
United States, are American citizens. He ought to understand our
ways, says an American intelligence officer who dealt with him in the
1990s. And he does. It s Kusa s grasp of Western ways that has made
him so effective in his primary role as Gaddafi s enabler, aiding and
abetting the Libyan leader s pathological behavior. Kusa concocts
excuses, fends off consequences, comes up with compromises, and thus
far has managed to keep his kinsman in power no matter what crimes the
Libyan leader has committed against his own people or against the
world. But what s really disturbing is the roster of world leaders he
helped to enlist as his fellow enablers: men like Tony Blair, Nicolas
Sarkozy, Silvio Berlusconi, Gordon Brown, and even George W. Bush.
How did they end up collaborating with the once and future
international pariah? The West s reconciliation with Gaddafi
disconcerted even the likes of former CIA director George Tenet, whose
memoir, At the Center of the Storm, called the negotiations with Kusa
illustrative of the surreal world in which we had to operate.
According to Tenet, many in the agency actually suspected Kusa of
masterminding the 1988 bombing that blew Pan Am Flight 103 out of the
sky over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing 270 people. But by 2003, Western
intelligence services had grown as comfortable with Kusa s proposals
as they were in the leather armchairs of the Travellers and they
helped Western leaders feel that way, too.
The really critical moment of excess came in 2009. Abdelbaset al-
Megrahi, the sole Libyan intelligence officer convicted for the
Lockerbie bombing, was serving a life sentence in Scotland, but had
been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer, supposedly with three
months to live.
If you do a Google search on "Abdelbaset al-Megrahi" along with the
word "oil", it looks like Megrahi got out of jail because an oil
company (BP) wanted him out of jail.
Barack Obama's favorite uncle, the Reverend Jeremiah Wright, in the
company of Louis Farrakhan, once visited their good friend Moamar
Gadaffi in his lair in Libya. Oops! I'm just absolutely sure they
never mentioned the visit to Barack Obama because he just didn't know!
He was never told!- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Obama once said Wright "is like an old uncle who says things I don't
always agree with". If you misunderstood that statement and took it to
mean that Wright is actually Obama's uncle, you're mistaken.

Unlike George W. Bush, Obama has never sucked up to Gadhafi. Speaking
of relatives, though, did you know that Bush's grandfather helped
Hitler rise to power?

"How Bush's grandfather helped Hitler's rise to power
Ben Aris in Berlin and Duncan Campbell in Washington
The Guardian, Saturday 25 September 2004 23.59 BST

Rumours of a link between the US first family and the Nazi war machine
have circulated for decades. Now the Guardian can reveal how
repercussions of events that culminated in action under the Trading
with the Enemy Act are still being felt by today's president

George Bush's grandfather, the late US senator Prescott Bush, was a
director and shareholder of companies that profited from their
involvement with the financial backers of Nazi Germany.
The Guardian has obtained confirmation from newly discovered files in
the US National Archives that a firm of which Prescott Bush was a
director was involved with the financial architects of Nazism.

His business dealings, which continued until his company's assets were
seized in 1942 under the Trading with the Enemy Act, has led more than
60 years later to a civil action for damages being brought in Germany
against the Bush family by two former slave labourers at Auschwitz and
to a hum of pre-election controversy.

The evidence has also prompted one former US Nazi war crimes
prosecutor to argue that the late senator's action should have been
grounds for prosecution for giving aid and comfort to the
enemy. . . ."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2004/sep/25/usa.secondworldwar
Evelyn
2011-03-08 14:41:50 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 17:27:19 -0800, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Barack Obama's favorite uncle, the Reverend Jeremiah Wright, in the
company of Louis Farrakhan, once visited their good friend Moamar
Gadaffi in his lair in Libya. Oops! I'm just absolutely sure they
never mentioned the visit to Barack Obama because he just didn't know!
He was never told!
What a cheap shot. That is even unworthy of one such as yourself!

Evelyn
GlennR
2011-03-08 15:01:41 UTC
Permalink
"Evelyn" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
: On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 17:27:19 -0800, El Castor
: <***@nowhere.net> wrote:
:
:
: >
: >Barack Obama's favorite uncle, the Reverend Jeremiah Wright, in the
: >company of Louis Farrakhan, once visited their good friend Moamar
: >Gadaffi in his lair in Libya. Oops! I'm just absolutely sure they
: >never mentioned the visit to Barack Obama because he just didn't know!
: >He was never told!
:
:
: What a cheap shot. That is even unworthy of one such as yourself!
:
: Evelyn
:

it's not cheap, he is,

his statement is stupid and irrelevant,

this is why hillbillies have not progressed in over 200 years


they can't get beyond the pre-adolescent " your mama dresses you funny" mentality

so they are doomed to be left behind as society and humanity progress without them

the same happened to native Americans and is happening to black people,

they are doomed to lives of bitterness and clinging to a past that wasn't that
good anyway

in Arizona they put the accomplishments of the WW2 code talkers on billboards,
as if that is the only good thing they can point to in their recent history

in confederate states they put simple and feeble minded crap on bumper stickers,
it's all they have

PeeJayOdonovan
2011-03-08 12:55:57 UTC
Permalink
 Can Buy Me Love
by Christopher Dickey
Christopher Dickey is a columnist for The Daily Beast and Newsweek
magazine's Paris bureau chief and Middle East editor. He is the author
of six books, including Summer of Deliverance, and most recently
Securing the City: Inside America's Best Counterterror Force—the NYPD.
====================
 Before Libyans rose up against him, Muammar Gaddafi used money, and
well-timed diplomatic overtures, to worm his way into the West’s good
graces. In this week’s Newsweek, Christopher Dickey looks at how Bush,
Blair, and Berlusconi gave the brutal dictator a makeover.
The tale is a sordid one, but let’s at least begin in relatively
pleasant surroundings, among the leather armchairs of the Travellers
Club in London. Its rooms have been a favorite rendezvous since the
19th century for gentlemen of international intrigue—and it’s where
Libya’s urbane, white-haired spymaster, Musa Kusa, met with
representatives of the British and American intelligence services in
December 2003. Their purpose was to hammer out a deal to bring Kusa’s
boss, Muammar Gaddafi, in from the cold.
 Prime Minister Tony Blairs meets with Colonel Muammar Qaddafi outside
Sirte, Libya on May 29, 2007. (Photo: Stefan Rousseau / AP Photo)
Kusa, now Libya’s foreign minister, affects none of the silly props
and pretenses—the tents and turbans and meandering rants—that have
become Gaddafi’s trademarks. He got his master’s degree at Michigan
State University in the 1970s, and both his children, born in the
United States, are American citizens. “He ought to understand our
ways,” says an American intelligence officer who dealt with him in the
1990s. And he does. It’s Kusa’s grasp of Western ways that has made
him so effective in his primary role as Gaddafi’s enabler, aiding and
abetting the Libyan leader’s pathological behavior. Kusa concocts
excuses, fends off consequences, comes up with compromises, and thus
far has managed to keep his kinsman in power no matter what crimes the
Libyan leader has committed against his own people or against the
world. But what’s really disturbing is the roster of world leaders he
helped to enlist as his fellow enablers: men like Tony Blair, Nicolas
Sarkozy, Silvio Berlusconi, Gordon Brown, and even George W. Bush.
How did they end up collaborating with the once and future
international pariah? The West’s reconciliation with Gaddafi
disconcerted even the likes of former CIA director George Tenet, whose
memoir, At the Center of the Storm, called the negotiations with Kusa
“illustrative of the surreal world in which we had to operate.”
According to Tenet, many in the agency actually suspected Kusa of
masterminding the 1988 bombing that blew Pan Am Flight 103 out of the
sky over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing 270 people. But by 2003, Western
intelligence services had grown as comfortable with Kusa’s proposals
as they were in the leather armchairs of the Travellers—and they
helped Western leaders feel that way, too.
The really critical moment of excess came in 2009. Abdelbaset al-
Megrahi, the sole Libyan intelligence officer convicted for the
Lockerbie bombing, was serving a life sentence in Scotland, but had
been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer, supposedly with three
months to live.
http://bit.ly/066c11
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