Discussion:
Is the EPA Allowing for the Approval of New Asbestos-Containing Products? The Environmental Protection Agency will be allowing for potential new uses of asbestos, while limiting the scope of studies that assess its risk.
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w***@gmail.com
2018-06-12 21:22:14 UTC
Permalink
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/is-epa-allowing-asbestos-products/


CLAIM

The Environmental Protection Agency will allow new asbestos products to enter the market.
RATING
Mostly True
WHAT'S TRUE

The EPA has proposed a framework that will allow for the approval for "new uses" of asbestos.
WHAT'S FALSE

The EPA has not changed anything about currently banned uses of asbestos, and any new uses would first be assessed by the agency.
ORIGIN

On 1 June 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics announced a proposed “Significant New Use Rule” (SNUR) for asbestos — a mineral once widely used in the construction of buildings thanks to its flame-retardant properties, but now uncontroversially considered a carcinogen.

SNURs are a mechanism within the Toxic Substances Control Act that mandate specific EPA approval when a chemical is used in a significantly new way or in a significantly new mixture that “might create concerns.”:

For asbestos, [the] EPA is proposing a SNUR for certain uses of asbestos (including asbestos-containing goods) that would require manufacturers and importers to receive EPA approval before starting or resuming manufacturing, and importing or processing of asbestos. This review process would provide EPA with the opportunity to evaluate the intended use of asbestos and, when necessary, take action to prohibit or limit the use.

The TSCA is currently undergoing a major overhaul that began under the Obama administration, but which is being reinterpreted in radically divergent ways under Administrator Pruitt’s leadership. To hear Pruitt explain the proposed rule, he is taking an “unprecedented” stand against the dangers of asbestos and protecting the public against potential harm by requiring manufacturers and importers “to receive EPA approval before starting or resuming manufacturing, and importing or processing of asbestos”:

These actions provide the American people with transparency and an opportunity to comment on how EPA plans to evaluate [ten chemicals being reconsidered under the TSCA, one of which is asbestos] undergoing risk evaluation, select studies, and use the best available science to ensure chemicals in the marketplace are safe. At the same time, we are moving forward to take important, unprecedented action on asbestos.

The problem, according to critics, is twofold. The first, more generally, is that the EPA could have used the currently unfolding overhaul of the TSCA — which began at the end of the Obama administration and has continued along a very different path under Trump — to ban any new uses of asbestos, something that had been the case at the end of the last administration. Instead, they are explicitly allowing new uses, but with the caveat that the EPA first evaluate possible potential new uses based on “risk evaluation, select studies, and use the best available science.”

The second problem, more specifically, concerns the way in which the EPA has proposed to evaluate that risk. In May 2018, the EPA published a document known as the “Problem Formulation of the Risk Evaluation for Asbestos,” which establishes the scientific approach the EPA will take in evaluating these new uses. Significantly, their approach will not include information from existing, or “legacy” uses of asbestos, despite the significant body of work around health risks stemming from those uses:

In the case of asbestos, legacy uses, associated disposals, and legacy disposals will be excluded from the problem formulation and risk evaluation […]. These include asbestos containing materials that remain in older buildings or are part of older products but for which manufacture, processing and distribution in commerce are not currently intended, known or reasonably foreseen.

EPA is excluding these activities because EPA generally interprets the mandates under section TSCA § 6(a)-(b) to conduct risk evaluations and any corresponding risk management to focus on uses for which manufacture, processing or distribution is intended, known to be occurring, or reasonably foreseen, rather than reaching back to evaluate the risks associated with legacy uses, associated disposal, and legacy disposal, and interprets the definition of conditions of use in that context.

This, E&E News reported, may serve to severely limit the types of exposures the EPA will include while formulating the potential risk of new uses for asbestos:



Public health advocates believe EPA is inappropriately limiting its health reviews of chemicals to avoid considering the impacts of those already in the environment. But the agency hasn’t been swayed by their pushback. […]

That means the agency won’t consider the dangers posed by, for example, asbestos-containing tiles, adhesives and piping in millions of homes and commercial buildings nationwide.

According to the New York Times, the new rules will serve to narrow the ways in which asbestos is defined, as well: .... (cont)
GLOBALIST
2018-06-12 22:12:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by w***@gmail.com
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/is-epa-allowing-asbestos-products/
CLAIM
The Environmental Protection Agency will allow new asbestos products to enter the market.
RATING
Mostly True
WHAT'S TRUE
The EPA has proposed a framework that will allow for the approval for "new uses" of asbestos.
WHAT'S FALSE
The EPA has not changed anything about currently banned uses of asbestos, and any new uses would first be assessed by the agency.
ORIGIN
On 1 June 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics announced a proposed “Significant New Use Rule” (SNUR) for asbestos — a mineral once widely used in the construction of buildings thanks to its flame-retardant properties, but now uncontroversially considered a carcinogen.
For asbestos, [the] EPA is proposing a SNUR for certain uses of asbestos (including asbestos-containing goods) that would require manufacturers and importers to receive EPA approval before starting or resuming manufacturing, and importing or processing of asbestos. This review process would provide EPA with the opportunity to evaluate the intended use of asbestos and, when necessary, take action to prohibit or limit the use.
These actions provide the American people with transparency and an opportunity to comment on how EPA plans to evaluate [ten chemicals being reconsidered under the TSCA, one of which is asbestos] undergoing risk evaluation, select studies, and use the best available science to ensure chemicals in the marketplace are safe. At the same time, we are moving forward to take important, unprecedented action on asbestos.
The problem, according to critics, is twofold. The first, more generally, is that the EPA could have used the currently unfolding overhaul of the TSCA — which began at the end of the Obama administration and has continued along a very different path under Trump — to ban any new uses of asbestos, something that had been the case at the end of the last administration. Instead, they are explicitly allowing new uses, but with the caveat that the EPA first evaluate possible potential new uses based on “risk evaluation, select studies, and use the best available science.”
In the case of asbestos, legacy uses, associated disposals, and legacy disposals will be excluded from the problem formulation and risk evaluation […]. These include asbestos containing materials that remain in older buildings or are part of older products but for which manufacture, processing and distribution in commerce are not currently intended, known or reasonably foreseen.
EPA is excluding these activities because EPA generally interprets the mandates under section TSCA § 6(a)-(b) to conduct risk evaluations and any corresponding risk management to focus on uses for which manufacture, processing or distribution is intended, known to be occurring, or reasonably foreseen, rather than reaching back to evaluate the risks associated with legacy uses, associated disposal, and legacy disposal, and interprets the definition of conditions of use in that context.
Public health advocates believe EPA is inappropriately limiting its health reviews of chemicals to avoid considering the impacts of those already in the environment. But the agency hasn’t been swayed by their pushback. […]
That means the agency won’t consider the dangers posed by, for example, asbestos-containing tiles, adhesives and piping in millions of homes and commercial buildings nationwide.
According to the New York Times, the new rules will serve to narrow the ways in which asbestos is defined, as well: .... (cont)
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Generally, asbestos-containing material that is in good condition and will not be disturbed (by remodeling, for example) will not release asbestos fibers. Asbestos-containing materials may release fibers when they are disturbed, damaged, removed improperly, repaired, cut, torn, sanded, sawed, drilled or scraped.Dec 19, 2016
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Asbestos after the hurricanes

Reaganomics, new wave music, the centennial of the Statue of Liberty and breakdancing were just a few of the highlights that made the 1980s unique. The '80s were also marked by hysteria over asbestos. In the 1970s, it became increasingly clear that exposure to this fibrous material had the potential to cause cancer and other respiratory problems. Perhaps what fueled asbestos hysteria the most was the revelation that asbestos could be found just about everywhere -- in offices, churches, schools, grocery stores and, worst of all, homes.

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Reaganomics, new wave music, the centennial of the Statue of Liberty and breakdancing were just a few of the highlights that made the 1980s unique. The '80s were also marked by hysteria over asbestos. In the 1970s, it became increasingly clear that exposure to this fibrous material had the potential to cause cancer and other respiratory problems. Perhaps what fueled asbestos hysteria the most was the revelation that asbestos could be found just about everywhere -- in offices, churches, schools, grocery stores and, worst of all, homes.
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If you’ve had a certified contractor come to your house to take samples and have found that there is indeed asbestos present in your home, what do you do next? That decision depends on a few factors.

Is the asbestos in your home in materials that are deteriorating or likely to be disturbed, perhaps through future remodeling? If so, then you should probably have the asbestos removed. Any sort of disturbance, like sanding paint or sawing fiberboard that contains asbestos, will release the fibers into the air in your home.

If the asbestos product is in good shape, or used in an out-of-the-way area -- for example, as insulation for heating or plumbing pipes in your crawlspace or attic -- you may be better off leaving the asbestos in place.

Should you choose to keep the asbestos products in your home, you have a few options for dealing with the problem. The U.S. EPA suggests that if you opt not to have asbestos materials removed, you should seal or cover them. Sealing includes using specially created products that are designed to coat an asbestos product and bind the fibers together permanently. This way, even if the asbestos is disturbed, the fibers will not be released. Covering asbestos can include wrapping it or closing it off from a room.

Whatever method you choose, it’s strongly recommended that you hire a certified professional contractor to carry out removal or sealing and covering processes. Just as taking samples of asbestos is dangerous, these other methods are even more so.

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However have no fear! global warming will kill you before
the asbestos in your attic.

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