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Cincinnati 'boon shoots at 1-year-old boy, is shot by man with concealed carry permit
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Triple K
2021-06-03 22:05:43 UTC
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A 62-year-old man with a gun in each hand fired at four people –
including a 1-year-old boy – before a civilian with a concealed
carry permit returned fire and wounded the shooter, cops told
FOX19.

Thomas McCary is being held without bond on four counts of
felonious assault.

McCary was arguing with a woman around 8 p.m. Sunday night and,
when the woman’s brother, Patrick Ewing, approached, McCary
pulled out a .38-caliber handgun and fired three shots at him,
Cincinnati police said.

Ewing didn’t get hit, but he did get his own gun and returned
fire, wounding McCary in the leg. Ewing had a permit to carry a
concealed weapon.

Injured, McCary went into his house to get a second gun and,
holding a weapon in each hand, he fired three shots in the
direction of the woman, Jeaneta Walker, her 1-year-old son and a
third man.

Ewing fired at McCary again to try to distract him as the
victims fled indoors. McCary squeezed off a few more rounds,
hitting no one, before withdrawing into his apartment,
Cincinnati.com reported.

McCary was taken to the University of Cincinnati Medical Center,
where he was arrested at 2:30 a.m. He was treated, released and
booked into the Hamilton County Jail by 3:42 a.m. McCary is
scheduled to face a judge Monday morning.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/07/27/cincinnati-man-shoots-at-1-
year-old-boy-is-shot-by-man-with-concealed-
carry/?intcmp=ob_article_footer_text&intcmp=obnetwork
 
CheckBox
2021-06-04 05:05:34 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 00:05:43 +0200 (CEST), "Triple K"
Post by Triple K
A 62-year-old man with a gun in each hand fired at four people –
including a 1-year-old boy – before a civilian with a concealed
carry permit returned fire and wounded the shooter, cops told
FOX19.
Thomas McCary is being held without bond on four counts of
felonious assault.
McCary was arguing with a woman around 8 p.m. Sunday night and,
when the woman’s brother, Patrick Ewing, approached, McCary
pulled out a .38-caliber handgun and fired three shots at him,
Cincinnati police said.
The old .38 ain't sexy, but it will get the job done.

Long LONG back I bought one of those .38 S&W
"cop" revolvers. Took it to a place where people
dumped old appliances. Discovered the traditional
158g RNL bullet would not even penetrate the
sheet metal of old refrigerator and washing machines.
Took it back to the store and swapped it for a Ruger
.357 "cop" revolver.

But, in retrospect, I wish I'd kept the S&W. Perps
are not made of sheet metal and even the "weak"
.38 is more than adequate for defensive work. The
Brits used the slightly weaker .38 S&W through
two world wars (no, the bullets are not compatible,
the 38-S&W is actually about .38 vs .357 for the
38-special, plus the case is shorter).

A woman I know loves her .38 snubby. At my
advice she switched to wadcutters - which while
not "powerful' in the numeric charts have low
recoil, high accuracy, and because of the totally
flat-nosed design will make a very nasty hole
at close range. She carried the thing all the time
she was getting cancer treatment and HOPED
some lefty would ask why she packed heat so
she could yank off her wig. She's ok now. Dunno
if she still carries the snubby. Probably. A .38
really is "good enough" for most anything - just
shoot straight. No reason to spray 9mm's all
over the fuckin' place .....
Just Wondering
2021-06-04 07:01:38 UTC
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Post by CheckBox
Long LONG back I bought one of those .38 S&W
"cop" revolvers. < clipped >
Took it back to the store and swapped it for a Ruger
.357 "cop" revolver.
But, in retrospect, I wish I'd kept the S&W. Perps
are not made of sheet metal and even the "weak"
.38 is more than adequate for defensive work. The
Brits used the slightly weaker .38 S&W through
two world wars (no, the bullets are not compatible,
the 38-S&W is actually about .38 vs .357 for the
38-special, plus the case is shorter).
Confusion lies in the fact that there are two similar cartridges,
the .38 S&W and the .38 S&W Special aka simply .38 special. The
.38 special is .357" and works just fine in a .357 mag revolver.
The .38 S&W is actually nominal .361 and is not as common.
dcx
2021-06-04 09:45:56 UTC
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Post by Just Wondering
Post by CheckBox
Long LONG back I bought one of those .38 S&W
"cop" revolvers. < clipped >
Took it back to the store and swapped it for a Ruger
.357 "cop" revolver.
But, in retrospect, I wish I'd kept the S&W. Perps
are not made of sheet metal and even the "weak"
.38 is more than adequate for defensive work. The
Brits used the slightly weaker .38 S&W through
two world wars (no, the bullets are not compatible,
the 38-S&W is actually about .38 vs .357 for the
38-special, plus the case is shorter).
Confusion lies in the fact that there are two similar cartridges,
the .38 S&W and the .38 S&W Special aka simply .38 special. The
.38 special is .357" and works just fine in a .357 mag revolver.
The .38 S&W is actually nominal .361 and is not as common.
The first .357 I owned was tested on a Ford 292 V8 block in a
junk yard.

It took three shots before the block failed the test to our
satisfaction.
CheckBox
2021-06-05 04:46:15 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 11:45:56 +0200 (CEST), " dcx "
Post by dcx
Post by Just Wondering
Post by CheckBox
Long LONG back I bought one of those .38 S&W
"cop" revolvers. < clipped >
Took it back to the store and swapped it for a Ruger
.357 "cop" revolver.
But, in retrospect, I wish I'd kept the S&W. Perps
are not made of sheet metal and even the "weak"
.38 is more than adequate for defensive work. The
Brits used the slightly weaker .38 S&W through
two world wars (no, the bullets are not compatible,
the 38-S&W is actually about .38 vs .357 for the
38-special, plus the case is shorter).
Confusion lies in the fact that there are two similar cartridges,
the .38 S&W and the .38 S&W Special aka simply .38 special. The
.38 special is .357" and works just fine in a .357 mag revolver.
The .38 S&W is actually nominal .361 and is not as common.
The first .357 I owned was tested on a Ford 292 V8 block in a
junk yard.
It took three shots before the block failed the test to our
satisfaction.
Cast iron engine blocks are pretty substantial. Even
a .357 might have problems. I once fired a 44-mag
at the differential pumpkin of an old junk truck. The
fucker BOUNCED BACK and missed my ear by
about half an inch ! Beware heavy metal :-)

Chester Gould - author of the Dick Tracy comix for
decades - was absolutely convinced the 38-spl
was somehow "magical". Dick was forever blasting
out the motor blocks of 40s/50s cars with his trusty
38 snubby :-)

I'd suggest Norma 10mm-Auto for that, minimum.

Anyway, the traditional 38-SW with its slow 200gr RNL
bullet really looks bad in any modern chart - but the Brits
swore by it until automatics finally came into fashion.
I think the big slow bullet REALLY HURT - as opposed
to the high-vels that kinda numbed the nerves on
impact. The high-vels were ultimately more lethal, but
the low-vels might actually have had more instant
"stopping power".

If you look around you can probably still find some wartime
38-SW break-top Webley's for pretty cheap. The problem
now is ammo - nobody sells any. You'll have to trim and
fireform 38-spl first and then work up (carefully) SW loads
with the proper diameter bullet.

The main issue with those Webs is the goddamned "V"
spring that works the lock lever. "V" springs *always* break.

CheckBox
2021-06-05 04:25:44 UTC
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Post by Just Wondering
Post by CheckBox
Long LONG back I bought one of those .38 S&W
"cop" revolvers. < clipped >
Took it back to the store and swapped it for a Ruger
.357 "cop" revolver.
But, in retrospect, I wish I'd kept the S&W. Perps
are not made of sheet metal and even the "weak"
.38 is more than adequate for defensive work. The
Brits used the slightly weaker .38 S&W through
two world wars (no, the bullets are not compatible,
the 38-S&W is actually about .38 vs .357 for the
38-special, plus the case is shorter).
Confusion lies in the fact that there are two similar cartridges,
the .38 S&W and the .38 S&W Special aka simply .38 special. The
.38 special is .357" and works just fine in a .357 mag revolver.
The .38 S&W is actually nominal .361 and is not as common.
I don't think you can even buy 38-S&W anymore. It's "obsolete"
like a lot of 19th-century ammo.

If you know how to handload, you can trim a 38-special case
and put a light load and lead bullet in it. On firing in the S&W
it will be fireformed to the proper diameter, although the base
will look a little weird. Then you can work up S&W loads with
the proper diameter bullet. DO check case capacity though,
you may have to drop the loads by a few grains. The traditional
bullet is a 200gr LRN.

The Brits had a theory about low-velocity bullets - and it may
be correct. High-vel sure looks good in the figures, but they
tend to "shock" the nerves into a temporary numbness. We
constantly hear reports of people taking multiple 9mm hits
and still battling on. The big slow bullet though - that HURTS,
a WHOLE FUCKIN' LOT. Doesn't jangle the nerves, the
effect is more like somebody jammed a blunt steel rebar rod
into your flesh.

Modern plus, the type of damage can be almost easily
be addressed by modern medicine. So, debilitating,
but survivable.
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