Discussion:
Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban and now Poland
(too old to reply)
GLOBALIST
2018-03-12 12:30:24 UTC
Permalink
A new law banning Sunday trading in Poland has come into effect, with supermarkets and other retail outlets closed.

The legislation, sought by the Solidarity trade union and supported by the Catholic Church, will limit shopping to the first and last Sundays of the month.

Next year trade will only be allowed on the last Sunday of the month before a wider ban halts shopping on most Sundays from 2020.

The Solidarity trade union said it introduced the change to ensure retail staff get free time at the weekends.

The liberal opposition and other critics argue it will limit job opportunities for students and affect cross-border shopping from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Slovakia.

The law applies to foreign-owned hypermarket chains as well as other non-Polish outlets.

It will still allow shopping online and at smaller locally-owned shops including bakeries and petrol stations.

The ban was first proposed by Solidarity in 2016.

The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) government, which is close to the Catholic Church, got behind the ban and passed the legislation in November.

Sunday shopping became a popular family pastime in Poland with the advent of the free market after the collapse of communism in 1989.

Hungary backtracked on a similar ban after it proved widely unpopular.

Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban.

Up to now, stores in Poland have remained closed for 12 days a year for major national or religious holidays.
mg
2018-03-12 18:26:18 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 05:30:24 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
A new law banning Sunday trading in Poland has come into effect, with supermarkets and other retail outlets closed.
The legislation, sought by the Solidarity trade union and supported by the Catholic Church, will limit shopping to the first and last Sundays of the month.
Next year trade will only be allowed on the last Sunday of the month before a wider ban halts shopping on most Sundays from 2020.
The Solidarity trade union said it introduced the change to ensure retail staff get free time at the weekends.
The liberal opposition and other critics argue it will limit job opportunities for students and affect cross-border shopping from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Slovakia.
The law applies to foreign-owned hypermarket chains as well as other non-Polish outlets.
It will still allow shopping online and at smaller locally-owned shops including bakeries and petrol stations.
The ban was first proposed by Solidarity in 2016.
The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) government, which is close to the Catholic Church, got behind the ban and passed the legislation in November.
Sunday shopping became a popular family pastime in Poland with the advent of the free market after the collapse of communism in 1989.
Hungary backtracked on a similar ban after it proved widely unpopular.
Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban.
Geeze! I never knew Switzerland and Norway had rules against Sunday
shopping! It never fails. Just when one starts to think that perhaps
there is a glimmer of hope for mankind to throw off its shackles of
barbarism, one finds out about something like this.

------------

"Absurdity rules in Sunday shopping

January 19, 2016

NEWS ANALYSIS: Norway’s debate over shopping on Sundays took off again
this week, after the three most powerful grocery chains that wield
control over consumers ended up in a highly public brawl involving
police. The noisy conflict also highlights absurdities in current law
that provide numerous loopholes for those opposing Sunday shopping to
actually profit from it.

It remains, in general, illegal for stores to open for business on
Sunday in Norway, even though the country’s conservative government
tried to change that last year. Reform-minded policians ran into
massive opposition from some of the most powerful grocery and
retailing lobbyists themselves, not least NorgesGruppen, which owns
and operates chains like Meny, Kiwi, Joker and Spar. . . ."
http://www.newsinenglish.no/2016/01/19/absurdity-rules-in-sunday-shopping/



----------------------------
"'Faith' is a fine invention
When Gentleman can see--
But Microscopes are prudent
In an Emergency."
--Emily Dickinson
Post by GLOBALIST
Up to now, stores in Poland have remained closed for 12 days a year for major national or religious holidays.
El Castor
2018-03-12 19:05:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by mg
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 05:30:24 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
A new law banning Sunday trading in Poland has come into effect, with supermarkets and other retail outlets closed.
The legislation, sought by the Solidarity trade union and supported by the Catholic Church, will limit shopping to the first and last Sundays of the month.
Next year trade will only be allowed on the last Sunday of the month before a wider ban halts shopping on most Sundays from 2020.
The Solidarity trade union said it introduced the change to ensure retail staff get free time at the weekends.
The liberal opposition and other critics argue it will limit job opportunities for students and affect cross-border shopping from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Slovakia.
The law applies to foreign-owned hypermarket chains as well as other non-Polish outlets.
It will still allow shopping online and at smaller locally-owned shops including bakeries and petrol stations.
The ban was first proposed by Solidarity in 2016.
The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) government, which is close to the Catholic Church, got behind the ban and passed the legislation in November.
Sunday shopping became a popular family pastime in Poland with the advent of the free market after the collapse of communism in 1989.
Hungary backtracked on a similar ban after it proved widely unpopular.
Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban.
Geeze! I never knew Switzerland and Norway had rules against Sunday
shopping! It never fails. Just when one starts to think that perhaps
there is a glimmer of hope for mankind to throw off its shackles of
barbarism, one finds out about something like this.
------------
"Absurdity rules in Sunday shopping
January 19, 2016
NEWS ANALYSIS: Norway’s debate over shopping on Sundays took off again
this week, after the three most powerful grocery chains that wield
control over consumers ended up in a highly public brawl involving
police. The noisy conflict also highlights absurdities in current law
that provide numerous loopholes for those opposing Sunday shopping to
actually profit from it.
It remains, in general, illegal for stores to open for business on
Sunday in Norway, even though the country’s conservative government
tried to change that last year. Reform-minded policians ran into
massive opposition from some of the most powerful grocery and
retailing lobbyists themselves, not least NorgesGruppen, which owns
and operates chains like Meny, Kiwi, Joker and Spar. . . ."
http://www.newsinenglish.no/2016/01/19/absurdity-rules-in-sunday-shopping/
----------------------------
"'Faith' is a fine invention
When Gentleman can see--
But Microscopes are prudent
In an Emergency."
--Emily Dickinson
Post by GLOBALIST
Up to now, stores in Poland have remained closed for 12 days a year for major national or religious holidays.
It's probably just a guaranteed day off for employees.
mg
2018-03-12 19:36:54 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 12:05:32 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by mg
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 05:30:24 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
A new law banning Sunday trading in Poland has come into effect, with supermarkets and other retail outlets closed.
The legislation, sought by the Solidarity trade union and supported by the Catholic Church, will limit shopping to the first and last Sundays of the month.
Next year trade will only be allowed on the last Sunday of the month before a wider ban halts shopping on most Sundays from 2020.
The Solidarity trade union said it introduced the change to ensure retail staff get free time at the weekends.
The liberal opposition and other critics argue it will limit job opportunities for students and affect cross-border shopping from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Slovakia.
The law applies to foreign-owned hypermarket chains as well as other non-Polish outlets.
It will still allow shopping online and at smaller locally-owned shops including bakeries and petrol stations.
The ban was first proposed by Solidarity in 2016.
The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) government, which is close to the Catholic Church, got behind the ban and passed the legislation in November.
Sunday shopping became a popular family pastime in Poland with the advent of the free market after the collapse of communism in 1989.
Hungary backtracked on a similar ban after it proved widely unpopular.
Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban.
Geeze! I never knew Switzerland and Norway had rules against Sunday
shopping! It never fails. Just when one starts to think that perhaps
there is a glimmer of hope for mankind to throw off its shackles of
barbarism, one finds out about something like this.
------------
"Absurdity rules in Sunday shopping
January 19, 2016
NEWS ANALYSIS: Norway’s debate over shopping on Sundays took off again
this week, after the three most powerful grocery chains that wield
control over consumers ended up in a highly public brawl involving
police. The noisy conflict also highlights absurdities in current law
that provide numerous loopholes for those opposing Sunday shopping to
actually profit from it.
It remains, in general, illegal for stores to open for business on
Sunday in Norway, even though the country’s conservative government
tried to change that last year. Reform-minded policians ran into
massive opposition from some of the most powerful grocery and
retailing lobbyists themselves, not least NorgesGruppen, which owns
and operates chains like Meny, Kiwi, Joker and Spar. . . ."
http://www.newsinenglish.no/2016/01/19/absurdity-rules-in-sunday-shopping/
----------------------------
"'Faith' is a fine invention
When Gentleman can see--
But Microscopes are prudent
In an Emergency."
--Emily Dickinson
Post by GLOBALIST
Up to now, stores in Poland have remained closed for 12 days a year for major national or religious holidays.
It's probably just a guaranteed day off for employees.
I suppose that ultimately these sorts of things should be solved by
public opinion and I've always liked California's referendum system
and I've often thought that it should be adopted, at least to some
extent, on the national level.

With our system of government, though, or with Switzerland's, or
Norway's system of government, how many issues like this are actually
solved based on public opinion and how often are "solutions" just
shoved down the public's throat because the bureaucracy knows how to
circumvent public opinion?
GLOBALIST
2018-03-12 20:11:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by mg
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 12:05:32 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by mg
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 05:30:24 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
A new law banning Sunday trading in Poland has come into effect, with supermarkets and other retail outlets closed.
The legislation, sought by the Solidarity trade union and supported by the Catholic Church, will limit shopping to the first and last Sundays of the month.
Next year trade will only be allowed on the last Sunday of the month before a wider ban halts shopping on most Sundays from 2020.
The Solidarity trade union said it introduced the change to ensure retail staff get free time at the weekends.
The liberal opposition and other critics argue it will limit job opportunities for students and affect cross-border shopping from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Slovakia.
The law applies to foreign-owned hypermarket chains as well as other non-Polish outlets.
It will still allow shopping online and at smaller locally-owned shops including bakeries and petrol stations.
The ban was first proposed by Solidarity in 2016.
The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) government, which is close to the Catholic Church, got behind the ban and passed the legislation in November.
Sunday shopping became a popular family pastime in Poland with the advent of the free market after the collapse of communism in 1989.
Hungary backtracked on a similar ban after it proved widely unpopular.
Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban.
Geeze! I never knew Switzerland and Norway had rules against Sunday
shopping! It never fails. Just when one starts to think that perhaps
there is a glimmer of hope for mankind to throw off its shackles of
barbarism, one finds out about something like this.
------------
"Absurdity rules in Sunday shopping
January 19, 2016
NEWS ANALYSIS: Norway’s debate over shopping on Sundays took off again
this week, after the three most powerful grocery chains that wield
control over consumers ended up in a highly public brawl involving
police. The noisy conflict also highlights absurdities in current law
that provide numerous loopholes for those opposing Sunday shopping to
actually profit from it.
It remains, in general, illegal for stores to open for business on
Sunday in Norway, even though the country’s conservative government
tried to change that last year. Reform-minded policians ran into
massive opposition from some of the most powerful grocery and
retailing lobbyists themselves, not least NorgesGruppen, which owns
and operates chains like Meny, Kiwi, Joker and Spar. . . ."
http://www.newsinenglish.no/2016/01/19/absurdity-rules-in-sunday-shopping/
----------------------------
"'Faith' is a fine invention
When Gentleman can see--
But Microscopes are prudent
In an Emergency."
--Emily Dickinson
Post by GLOBALIST
Up to now, stores in Poland have remained closed for 12 days a year for major national or religious holidays.
It's probably just a guaranteed day off for employees.
I suppose that ultimately these sorts of things should be solved by
public opinion and I've always liked California's referendum system
and I've often thought that it should be adopted, at least to some
extent, on the national level.
With our system of government, though, or with Switzerland's, or
Norway's system of government, how many issues like this are actually
solved based on public opinion and how often are "solutions" just
shoved down the public's throat because the bureaucracy knows how to
circumvent public opinion?
Or it could be as simple as being Christian nations and based
on a Christian heritage, a 6 day work week is enough.
Make the 6 day work week a normal cycle and you would
be surprised that the ordinary worker would love it
Yet you have your policemen and hospital staff who have
rotating days off.....but there for our emergencies.
mg
2018-03-12 21:09:54 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 13:11:17 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
Post by mg
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 12:05:32 -0700, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by mg
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 05:30:24 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
A new law banning Sunday trading in Poland has come into effect, with supermarkets and other retail outlets closed.
The legislation, sought by the Solidarity trade union and supported by the Catholic Church, will limit shopping to the first and last Sundays of the month.
Next year trade will only be allowed on the last Sunday of the month before a wider ban halts shopping on most Sundays from 2020.
The Solidarity trade union said it introduced the change to ensure retail staff get free time at the weekends.
The liberal opposition and other critics argue it will limit job opportunities for students and affect cross-border shopping from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Slovakia.
The law applies to foreign-owned hypermarket chains as well as other non-Polish outlets.
It will still allow shopping online and at smaller locally-owned shops including bakeries and petrol stations.
The ban was first proposed by Solidarity in 2016.
The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) government, which is close to the Catholic Church, got behind the ban and passed the legislation in November.
Sunday shopping became a popular family pastime in Poland with the advent of the free market after the collapse of communism in 1989.
Hungary backtracked on a similar ban after it proved widely unpopular.
Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban.
Geeze! I never knew Switzerland and Norway had rules against Sunday
shopping! It never fails. Just when one starts to think that perhaps
there is a glimmer of hope for mankind to throw off its shackles of
barbarism, one finds out about something like this.
------------
"Absurdity rules in Sunday shopping
January 19, 2016
NEWS ANALYSIS: Norway’s debate over shopping on Sundays took off again
this week, after the three most powerful grocery chains that wield
control over consumers ended up in a highly public brawl involving
police. The noisy conflict also highlights absurdities in current law
that provide numerous loopholes for those opposing Sunday shopping to
actually profit from it.
It remains, in general, illegal for stores to open for business on
Sunday in Norway, even though the country’s conservative government
tried to change that last year. Reform-minded policians ran into
massive opposition from some of the most powerful grocery and
retailing lobbyists themselves, not least NorgesGruppen, which owns
and operates chains like Meny, Kiwi, Joker and Spar. . . ."
http://www.newsinenglish.no/2016/01/19/absurdity-rules-in-sunday-shopping/
----------------------------
"'Faith' is a fine invention
When Gentleman can see--
But Microscopes are prudent
In an Emergency."
--Emily Dickinson
Post by GLOBALIST
Up to now, stores in Poland have remained closed for 12 days a year for major national or religious holidays.
It's probably just a guaranteed day off for employees.
I suppose that ultimately these sorts of things should be solved by
public opinion and I've always liked California's referendum system
and I've often thought that it should be adopted, at least to some
extent, on the national level.
With our system of government, though, or with Switzerland's, or
Norway's system of government, how many issues like this are actually
solved based on public opinion and how often are "solutions" just
shoved down the public's throat because the bureaucracy knows how to
circumvent public opinion?
Or it could be as simple as being Christian nations and based
on a Christian heritage, a 6 day work week is enough.
Make the 6 day work week a normal cycle and you would
be surprised that the ordinary worker would love it
Yet you have your policemen and hospital staff who have
rotating days off.....but there for our emergencies.
Is saying that a country is a Christian nation the same thing as
saying that opinion polls, or voter referendums, etc., aren't
necessary or appropriate when dealing with religious issues?
GLOBALIST
2018-03-12 19:19:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by mg
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 05:30:24 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
A new law banning Sunday trading in Poland has come into effect, with supermarkets and other retail outlets closed.
The legislation, sought by the Solidarity trade union and supported by the Catholic Church, will limit shopping to the first and last Sundays of the month.
Next year trade will only be allowed on the last Sunday of the month before a wider ban halts shopping on most Sundays from 2020.
The Solidarity trade union said it introduced the change to ensure retail staff get free time at the weekends.
The liberal opposition and other critics argue it will limit job opportunities for students and affect cross-border shopping from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Slovakia.
The law applies to foreign-owned hypermarket chains as well as other non-Polish outlets.
It will still allow shopping online and at smaller locally-owned shops including bakeries and petrol stations.
The ban was first proposed by Solidarity in 2016.
The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) government, which is close to the Catholic Church, got behind the ban and passed the legislation in November.
Sunday shopping became a popular family pastime in Poland with the advent of the free market after the collapse of communism in 1989.
Hungary backtracked on a similar ban after it proved widely unpopular.
Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban.
Geeze! I never knew Switzerland and Norway had rules against Sunday
shopping! It never fails. Just when one starts to think that perhaps
there is a glimmer of hope for mankind to throw off its shackles of
barbarism, one finds out about something like this.
------------
"Absurdity rules in Sunday shopping
January 19, 2016
NEWS ANALYSIS: Norway’s debate over shopping on Sundays took off again
this week, after the three most powerful grocery chains that wield
control over consumers ended up in a highly public brawl involving
police. The noisy conflict also highlights absurdities in current law
that provide numerous loopholes for those opposing Sunday shopping to
actually profit from it.
It remains, in general, illegal for stores to open for business on
Sunday in Norway, even though the country’s conservative government
tried to change that last year. Reform-minded policians ran into
massive opposition from some of the most powerful grocery and
retailing lobbyists themselves, not least NorgesGruppen, which owns
and operates chains like Meny, Kiwi, Joker and Spar. . . ."
http://www.newsinenglish.no/2016/01/19/absurdity-rules-in-sunday-shopping/
----------------------------
"'Faith' is a fine invention
When Gentleman can see--
But Microscopes are prudent
In an Emergency."
--Emily Dickinson
Post by GLOBALIST
Up to now, stores in Poland have remained closed for 12 days a year for major national or religious holidays.
Gas and stores like 711 are open. It is to assure that everyone has at least one
day off. Chick FilA is closed ever Sunday. In fact they close earlier
on Saturday afternoon, I think so Jews/Muslims can go to prayers.
My supermarket is open 24 hours so closing one day would be no big deal.
The Sabbath is a "day of rest". Everything comes to a halt, so you
can get off the treadmill. Buses and the light rail run so folks can
get around.
mg
2018-03-12 21:18:38 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 12:19:08 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
Post by mg
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 05:30:24 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
A new law banning Sunday trading in Poland has come into effect, with supermarkets and other retail outlets closed.
The legislation, sought by the Solidarity trade union and supported by the Catholic Church, will limit shopping to the first and last Sundays of the month.
Next year trade will only be allowed on the last Sunday of the month before a wider ban halts shopping on most Sundays from 2020.
The Solidarity trade union said it introduced the change to ensure retail staff get free time at the weekends.
The liberal opposition and other critics argue it will limit job opportunities for students and affect cross-border shopping from the Baltic states, Belarus, Ukraine and Slovakia.
The law applies to foreign-owned hypermarket chains as well as other non-Polish outlets.
It will still allow shopping online and at smaller locally-owned shops including bakeries and petrol stations.
The ban was first proposed by Solidarity in 2016.
The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) government, which is close to the Catholic Church, got behind the ban and passed the legislation in November.
Sunday shopping became a popular family pastime in Poland with the advent of the free market after the collapse of communism in 1989.
Hungary backtracked on a similar ban after it proved widely unpopular.
Switzerland and Norway limit Sunday shopping, while Austria has a blanket ban.
Geeze! I never knew Switzerland and Norway had rules against Sunday
shopping! It never fails. Just when one starts to think that perhaps
there is a glimmer of hope for mankind to throw off its shackles of
barbarism, one finds out about something like this.
------------
"Absurdity rules in Sunday shopping
January 19, 2016
NEWS ANALYSIS: Norway’s debate over shopping on Sundays took off again
this week, after the three most powerful grocery chains that wield
control over consumers ended up in a highly public brawl involving
police. The noisy conflict also highlights absurdities in current law
that provide numerous loopholes for those opposing Sunday shopping to
actually profit from it.
It remains, in general, illegal for stores to open for business on
Sunday in Norway, even though the country’s conservative government
tried to change that last year. Reform-minded policians ran into
massive opposition from some of the most powerful grocery and
retailing lobbyists themselves, not least NorgesGruppen, which owns
and operates chains like Meny, Kiwi, Joker and Spar. . . ."
http://www.newsinenglish.no/2016/01/19/absurdity-rules-in-sunday-shopping/
----------------------------
"'Faith' is a fine invention
When Gentleman can see--
But Microscopes are prudent
In an Emergency."
--Emily Dickinson
Post by GLOBALIST
Up to now, stores in Poland have remained closed for 12 days a year for major national or religious holidays.
Gas and stores like 711 are open. It is to assure that everyone has at least one
day off.
People don't need Big Brother, or the Vatican, watching out for them
on Sundays. If they don't want to work on Sundays they can find a job
where they don't have to. After all, we are talking about countries
that have a democratic form of government, aren't we?
Post by GLOBALIST
Chick FilA is closed ever Sunday. In fact they close earlier
on Saturday afternoon, I think so Jews/Muslims can go to prayers.
My supermarket is open 24 hours so closing one day would be no big deal.
The Sabbath is a "day of rest". Everything comes to a halt, so you
can get off the treadmill. Buses and the light rail run so folks can
get around.
Loading...