Discussion:
Supreme Court to hear case of Ohio taking inactive voters off rolls
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Leroy N. Soetoro
2018-01-11 20:25:38 UTC
Permalink
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2018/01/01/supreme-court-to-hear-case-
ohio-taking-inactive-voters-off-
rolls.html?intcmp=ob_article_sidebar_video&intcmp=obnetwork

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Joseph Helle was expecting a different sort of reception
when he returned home from Army tours in Iraq and Afghanistan and showed
up to vote in his small Ohio town near Lake Erie.

His name was missing from the voting rolls in 2011, even though Helle had
registered to vote before leaving home at 18 and hadn't changed his
address during his military service.

Helle, now the mayor of Oak Harbor, Ohio, is among thousands of state
residents with tales of being removed from Ohio's rolls because they
didn't vote in some elections. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Jan.
10 in the disputed practice, which generally pits Democrats against
Republicans.

The case has taken on added importance because the parties have squared
off over ballot access across the country. Democrats have accused
Republicans of trying to suppress votes from minorities and poorer people
who tend to vote for Democrats. Republicans have argued that they are
trying to promote ballot integrity and prevent voter fraud. Only a handful
of states use a process similar to Ohio's, but others could join in if the
high court sides with the state.

Adding to the mix, the Trump administration reversed the position taken by
the Obama administration and is now backing Ohio's method for purging
voters.

Helle, 31, describes himself as a "red-state Democrat" and did not vote
for President Donald Trump or Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in the
2016 election.

"I'm not one of these people that flaunts their military service, by any
means. But to be told I couldn't do one of the fundamental rights I went
off and served this country for was just appalling," Helle said,
recounting his reaction after being dropped from voter registration rolls.

"I'm not one of these people that flaunts their military service, by any
means. But to be told I couldn't do one of the fundamental rights I went
off and served this country for was just appalling."

- Joseph Helle, U.S. Army veteran and mayor of Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ohio has used voters' inactivity to trigger the removal process since
1994, although groups representing voters did not sue the Republican
secretary of state, Jon Husted, until 2016. As part of the lawsuit, a
judge last year ordered the state to count 7,515 ballots cast by people
whose names had been removed from the voter rolls.

A federal appeals court panel in Cincinnati split 2-1 last year in ruling
that Ohio's process is illegal. In May, the Supreme Court agreed to hear
the case.

Under Ohio rules, registered voters who fail to vote in a two-year period
are targeted for eventual removal from registration rolls, even if they
haven't moved and remain eligible. The state says it removes names only
after local election boards send notices and there's no subsequent voting
activity for the next four years. Ohio argues this helps ensure election
security.

"It's important for us to keep up-to-date, accurate voter logs," said
Aaron Sellers, a spokesman for the Franklin County Board of Elections in
Ohio's largest county.

Helle said he had no idea his name had been dropped and said he mailed in
absentee ballots in some years and not others. His local elections board
said it has no record that Helle voted while he was away.

But even if he hadn't voted, Helle said, opting not to cast a ballot
should be a voter's choice and shouldn't be penalized.

"That's part of the free-speech argument to me," he said. "Choosing not to
vote is as important as choosing to vote. It's one way to say, I do not
believe in what's going on here, or in either candidate, for instance."

The main argument on behalf of voters whose registrations were canceled is
that federal voting law specifically prohibits states from using voter
inactivity to trigger purges. The state "purges registered voters who are
still eligible to vote," former and current Ohio elections officials said
in a brief supporting the voters.

At the Supreme Court, voting cases often split the court's liberal and
conservative justices. Civil rights groups contend that a decision for
Ohio would have widespread implications because there is a "nationwide
push to make it more difficult and costly to vote," as the NAACP Legal
Defense and Educational Fund told the court. A dozen mainly Democratic
states also want the Supreme Court to declare that Ohio's system violates
federal law.

Ohio, backed by 17 other mostly Republican states, said it is complying
with federal law. The state, where Republicans have controlled the
secretary of state's office for all but four years since 1991, said it
first compares its voter lists with a U.S. Postal Service list of people
who have reported a change of address. The problem, the state said, is
that some people move without notifying the post office.

So the state asks people who haven't voted in two years to confirm their
eligibility. If they do, or if they show up to vote over the next four
years, voters remain registered. If they do nothing, their names
eventually fall off the list of registered voters.

The Trump administration said the practice complies with federal law
because people are not removed from the rolls "by reason of their initial
failure to vote." They are sent a notice, the administration said in its
Supreme Court brief, but only removed if "they fail to respond and fail to
vote" in the elections that follow the notice.

A decision in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute, 16-980, is expected
by late June.
--
Donald J. Trump, 304 electoral votes to 227, defeated compulsive liar in
denial Hillary Rodham Clinton on December 19th, 2016. The clown car
parade of the democrat party ran out of gas and got run over by a Trump
truck.

Congratulations President Trump. Thank you for cleaning up the disaster
of the Obama presidency.

Under Barack Obama's leadership, the United States of America became the
The World According To Garp.

ObamaCare is a total 100% failure and no lie that can be put forth by its
supporters can dispute that.

Obama jobs, the result of ObamaCare. 12-15 working hours a week at minimum
wage, no benefits and the primary revenue stream for ObamaCare. It can't
be funded with money people don't have, yet liberals lie about how great
it is.

Obama increased total debt from $10 trillion to $20 trillion in the eight
years he was in office, and sold out heterosexuals for Hollywood queer
liberal democrat donors.
GLOBALIST
2018-01-11 21:30:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leroy N. Soetoro
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2018/01/01/supreme-court-to-hear-case-
ohio-taking-inactive-voters-off-
rolls.html?intcmp=ob_article_sidebar_video&intcmp=obnetwork
COLUMBUS, Ohio – Joseph Helle was expecting a different sort of reception
when he returned home from Army tours in Iraq and Afghanistan and showed
up to vote in his small Ohio town near Lake Erie.
His name was missing from the voting rolls in 2011, even though Helle had
registered to vote before leaving home at 18 and hadn't changed his
address during his military service.
Helle, now the mayor of Oak Harbor, Ohio, is among thousands of state
residents with tales of being removed from Ohio's rolls because they
didn't vote in some elections. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Jan.
10 in the disputed practice, which generally pits Democrats against
Republicans.
The case has taken on added importance because the parties have squared
off over ballot access across the country. Democrats have accused
Republicans of trying to suppress votes from minorities and poorer people
who tend to vote for Democrats. Republicans have argued that they are
trying to promote ballot integrity and prevent voter fraud. Only a handful
of states use a process similar to Ohio's, but others could join in if the
high court sides with the state.
Adding to the mix, the Trump administration reversed the position taken by
the Obama administration and is now backing Ohio's method for purging
voters.
Helle, 31, describes himself as a "red-state Democrat" and did not vote
for President Donald Trump or Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in the
2016 election.
"I'm not one of these people that flaunts their military service, by any
means. But to be told I couldn't do one of the fundamental rights I went
off and served this country for was just appalling," Helle said,
recounting his reaction after being dropped from voter registration rolls.
"I'm not one of these people that flaunts their military service, by any
means. But to be told I couldn't do one of the fundamental rights I went
off and served this country for was just appalling."
- Joseph Helle, U.S. Army veteran and mayor of Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ohio has used voters' inactivity to trigger the removal process since
1994, although groups representing voters did not sue the Republican
secretary of state, Jon Husted, until 2016. As part of the lawsuit, a
judge last year ordered the state to count 7,515 ballots cast by people
whose names had been removed from the voter rolls.
A federal appeals court panel in Cincinnati split 2-1 last year in ruling
that Ohio's process is illegal. In May, the Supreme Court agreed to hear
the case.
Under Ohio rules, registered voters who fail to vote in a two-year period
are targeted for eventual removal from registration rolls, even if they
haven't moved and remain eligible. The state says it removes names only
after local election boards send notices and there's no subsequent voting
activity for the next four years. Ohio argues this helps ensure election
security.
"It's important for us to keep up-to-date, accurate voter logs," said
Aaron Sellers, a spokesman for the Franklin County Board of Elections in
Ohio's largest county.
Helle said he had no idea his name had been dropped and said he mailed in
absentee ballots in some years and not others. His local elections board
said it has no record that Helle voted while he was away.
But even if he hadn't voted, Helle said, opting not to cast a ballot
should be a voter's choice and shouldn't be penalized.
"That's part of the free-speech argument to me," he said. "Choosing not to
vote is as important as choosing to vote. It's one way to say, I do not
believe in what's going on here, or in either candidate, for instance."
The main argument on behalf of voters whose registrations were canceled is
that federal voting law specifically prohibits states from using voter
inactivity to trigger purges. The state "purges registered voters who are
still eligible to vote," former and current Ohio elections officials said
in a brief supporting the voters.
At the Supreme Court, voting cases often split the court's liberal and
conservative justices. Civil rights groups contend that a decision for
Ohio would have widespread implications because there is a "nationwide
push to make it more difficult and costly to vote," as the NAACP Legal
Defense and Educational Fund told the court. A dozen mainly Democratic
states also want the Supreme Court to declare that Ohio's system violates
federal law.
Ohio, backed by 17 other mostly Republican states, said it is complying
with federal law. The state, where Republicans have controlled the
secretary of state's office for all but four years since 1991, said it
first compares its voter lists with a U.S. Postal Service list of people
who have reported a change of address. The problem, the state said, is
that some people move without notifying the post office.
So the state asks people who haven't voted in two years to confirm their
eligibility. If they do, or if they show up to vote over the next four
years, voters remain registered. If they do nothing, their names
eventually fall off the list of registered voters.
The Trump administration said the practice complies with federal law
because people are not removed from the rolls "by reason of their initial
failure to vote." They are sent a notice, the administration said in its
Supreme Court brief, but only removed if "they fail to respond and fail to
vote" in the elections that follow the notice.
A decision in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute, 16-980, is expected
by late June.
--
Donald J. Trump, 304 electoral votes to 227, defeated compulsive liar in
denial Hillary Rodham Clinton on December 19th, 2016. The clown car
parade of the democrat party ran out of gas and got run over by a Trump
truck.
Congratulations President Trump. Thank you for cleaning up the disaster
of the Obama presidency.
Under Barack Obama's leadership, the United States of America became the
The World According To Garp.
ObamaCare is a total 100% failure and no lie that can be put forth by its
supporters can dispute that.
Obama jobs, the result of ObamaCare. 12-15 working hours a week at minimum
wage, no benefits and the primary revenue stream for ObamaCare. It can't
be funded with money people don't have, yet liberals lie about how great
it is.
Obama increased total debt from $10 trillion to $20 trillion in the eight
years he was in office, and sold out heterosexuals for Hollywood queer
liberal democrat donors.
Not a problem! If they are so inclined to get involved
in their own city,state and nation all they have to do
is reapply.

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