Discussion:
Democrats got millions more votes – so how did Republicans win the Senate? Senate electoral process means although Democrats received more overall votes for the Senate than Republicans, that does not translate to more seats
(too old to reply)
w***@gmail.com
2018-11-08 20:51:07 UTC
Permalink
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/nov/08/democrats-republicans-senate-majority-minority-rule?fbclid=IwAR2D1VW4dMOibcAE6PYtwizpho1uQhlOm6Fw22xDewg2BGcdYSRMDaBqRQ0

excerpts:

The real concerns for Democrats, they said, could be found in a combination of gerrymandering and voter suppression tactics that might have prevented them from winning an even larger majority in the House and some key statewide elections.

“The rise of minority rule in America is now unmistakable,” said Laurence Tribe, a constitutional law professor at Harvard University.

“Especially with a sitting president who won a majority in the electoral college [in 2016] while receiving roughly 3m fewer votes than his opponent, and a supreme court five of whose nine justices were nominated by Republican presidents who collectively received fewer popular votes than their Democratic opponents and were confirmed by Senates similarly skewed.”
Advertisement

According to the latest data, Democrats won the House popular vote by about seven percentage points in Tuesday night’s midterms.
Blue wave or blue ripple? A visual guide to the Democrats’ gains in the midterms
Read more

They picked up 29 Republican-held seats in the House, while losing two of their own incumbents, resulting in a net gain of 27 seats. Republicans meanwhile won a larger majority in the Senate, picking up at least two seats as a handful of vulnerable Democrats faced defeat.
CLOISTER
2018-11-08 21:21:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by w***@gmail.com
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/nov/08/democrats-republicans-senate-majority-minority-rule?fbclid=IwAR2D1VW4dMOibcAE6PYtwizpho1uQhlOm6Fw22xDewg2BGcdYSRMDaBqRQ0
The real concerns for Democrats, they said, could be found in a combination of gerrymandering and voter suppression tactics that might have prevented them from winning an even larger majority in the House and some key statewide elections.
“The rise of minority rule in America is now unmistakable,” said Laurence Tribe, a constitutional law professor at Harvard University.
“Especially with a sitting president who won a majority in the electoral college [in 2016] while receiving roughly 3m fewer votes than his opponent, and a supreme court five of whose nine justices were nominated by Republican presidents who collectively received fewer popular votes than their Democratic opponents and were confirmed by Senates similarly skewed.”
Advertisement
According to the latest data, Democrats won the House popular vote by about seven percentage points in Tuesday night’s midterms.
Blue wave or blue ripple? A visual guide to the Democrats’ gains in the midterms
Read more
They picked up 29 Republican-held seats in the House, while losing two of their own incumbents, resulting in a net gain of 27 seats. Republicans meanwhile won a larger majority in the Senate, picking up at least two seats as a handful of vulnerable Democrats faced defeat.
Putin-I tell you. Those commies are trying to wreck out government
Mark my word...the end is near
PJay OD
2018-11-08 22:28:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by w***@gmail.com
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/nov/08/democrats-republicans-senate-majority-minority-rule?fbclid=IwAR2D1VW4dMOibcAE6PYtwizpho1uQhlOm6Fw22xDewg2BGcdYSRMDaBqRQ0
The real concerns for Democrats, they said, could be found in a combination of gerrymandering and voter suppression tactics that might have prevented them from winning an even larger majority in the House and some key statewide elections.
“The rise of minority rule in America is now unmistakable,” said Laurence Tribe, a constitutional law professor at Harvard University.
“Especially with a sitting president who won a majority in the electoral college [in 2016] while receiving roughly 3m fewer votes than his opponent, and a supreme court five of whose nine justices were nominated by Republican presidents who collectively received fewer popular votes than their Democratic opponents and were confirmed by Senates similarly skewed.”
Advertisement
According to the latest data, Democrats won the House popular vote by about seven percentage points in Tuesday night’s midterms.
Blue wave or blue ripple? A visual guide to the Democrats’ gains in the midterms
Read more
They picked up 29 Republican-held seats in the House, while losing two of their own incumbents, resulting in a net gain of 27 seats. Republicans meanwhile won a larger majority in the Senate, picking up at least two seats as a handful of vulnerable Democrats faced defeat.
Most eligible voters (53%) didn't bother to vote at all in 2018 while even only 60% of eligibles voted in 2016.

Google can confirm it for you

Loading...