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Covid-19 has exposed ugliness of GLOBALISM & OPEN BORDERS – and given nations incentive to regain INDEPENDENCE
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CLOISTER
2020-04-06 15:33:22 UTC
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https://www.rt.com/op-ed/485092-coronavirus-globalism-independence-supply/

By Mitchell Feierstein, investor, banker, and author of Planet Ponzi: How we got into this mess, what happens next, and how to protect yourself. He spends his time between London and Manhattan.

Globalism’s open borders and just-in-time supply chains have been providing cheap labor and products — but the coronavirus pandemic has shown us the huge cost of neglected independence.

Covid-19 has opened the kimono of globalism, and what’s underneath is ugly. The virus has illustrated the importance of, and our reliance on, just-in-time supply chains. Supply chains are only as strong as their weakest link. If any ingredient is missing from that supply chain, the nation controlling that commodity can break it, causing devastating economic, geopolitical and social consequences.

As scientists break down borders to fight Covid-19, nationalist leaders build them back upAs scientists break down borders to fight Covid-19, nationalist leaders build them back up

For example, take emergency medical supplies and critical drugs. Most antibiotics, as well as the main ingredients to produce them, are made in China. India has prohibited the export of hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug that President Trump touted as a “game changer” in the treatment of Coronavirus. Even basic over-the-counter drugs like paracetamol are “out-of-stock.” Hen’s teeth and capable Central Bankers seem easier to find than N95 facemasks, gloves, thermometers, pulse oximeters, hand sanitiser, and isopropyl alcohol. We also rely on other nations’ electrical parts to run critical infrastructure, trucks, trains, planes and automobiles.

The imposition of national export bans on medical supply chain ingredients is a wakeup call for every nation state that has become reliant upon other nations for products they no longer produce domestically. Scarcity of critical commodities and medical supplies needs to be part of every National Security dialogue. People's lives depend upon the unrestricted access to and supply of these drugs, medical products and equipment, which today, thanks to 30 years of neoliberal globalism, are now beyond our control. We need to rebuild this infrastructure and become self-sufficient in providing necessities. Right now, we don't have the ventilators or drugs required to combat and treat Covid-19 — who decides who lives or dies? We should NEVER have been in this position — we must never be in it again.

Any disruption to our supply chain will result in a surge in unemployment and mortgage defaults, and people won’t be able to feed their families. Civil unrest has already begun in Italy, and it will go viral globally.

Countries need to urgently review and categorize which industries are a matter of national security or, more simply put, are a matter of life or death to their citizens.

When I stood for a seat in last December’s UK Parliamentary elections, independence, restoration of democratic principles and liberty, and financial conservativism were the cornerstone issues guiding my campaign. Each nation state needs to rethink and recategorize its priorities. The health, safety and prosperity of the citizenry should be placed above identity politics, the toxicity of an entitled cancel culture and mob rule by social media. When taking a sober look at Brexit and my reasons for wanting to leave the European Union, Covid-19 provides a stark reminder that in order for a nation to survive and thrive, independence, not interdependence on supply chains should be priority number one. Covid-19 has illustrated how interdependence can cost lives.


$6 Trillion ‘rescue package,’ unaffordable bailouts and buybacks: Bend over, here it comes again!

Covid-19 has ravaged Italy where the death rate has been oscillating between 11% and 14%. These are the highest recorded mortality rates attributed to coronavirus during this crisis. This is an unprecedented humanitarian crisis.
They need help and they need it now. They called upon the EU, but the cries fell upon deaf ears. The only help came from Russia. Last time I looked, out of the 154 countries I reviewed in 2017, Italy’s GDP (Gross Domestic Product) growth over the previous 17 years was in the 152nd spot, right above Haiti and Zimbabwe. Italy has issued the most debt in the EU and owes around $4 trillion which, as I have been warning for years, Italy can never and will never repay. A default is imminent. The Great Financial crisis of 2008 caused Italy’s youth unemployment rate to skyrocket. By 2014, these numbers topped 42%, one of the highest in the EU, as Italy’s debt soared.

Of course, central bankers have the ultimate bailout solution. Just follow these instructions:
(David P.)
2020-04-06 15:46:34 UTC
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Post by CLOISTER
https://www.rt.com/op-ed/485092-coronavirus-globalism-independence-supply/
By Mitchell Feierstein, investor, banker, and author of Planet Ponzi: How we got into this mess, what happens next, and how to protect yourself. He spends his time between London and Manhattan.
Globalism’s open borders and just-in-time supply chains have been providing cheap labor and products — but the coronavirus pandemic has shown us the huge cost of neglected independence.
Covid-19 has opened the kimono of globalism, and what’s underneath is ugly. The virus has illustrated the importance of, and our reliance on, just-in-time supply chains. Supply chains are only as strong as their weakest link. If any ingredient is missing from that supply chain, the nation controlling that commodity can break it, causing devastating economic, geopolitical and social consequences.
As scientists break down borders to fight Covid-19, nationalist leaders build them back upAs scientists break down borders to fight Covid-19, nationalist leaders build them back up
For example, take emergency medical supplies and critical drugs. Most antibiotics, as well as the main ingredients to produce them, are made in China. India has prohibited the export of hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug that President Trump touted as a “game changer” in the treatment of Coronavirus. Even basic over-the-counter drugs like paracetamol are “out-of-stock.” Hen’s teeth and capable Central Bankers seem easier to find than N95 facemasks, gloves, thermometers, pulse oximeters, hand sanitiser, and isopropyl alcohol. We also rely on other nations’ electrical parts to run critical infrastructure, trucks, trains, planes and automobiles.
The imposition of national export bans on medical supply chain ingredients is a wakeup call for every nation state that has become reliant upon other nations for products they no longer produce domestically. Scarcity of critical commodities and medical supplies needs to be part of every National Security dialogue. People's lives depend upon the unrestricted access to and supply of these drugs, medical products and equipment, which today, thanks to 30 years of neoliberal globalism, are now beyond our control. We need to rebuild this infrastructure and become self-sufficient in providing necessities. Right now, we don't have the ventilators or drugs required to combat and treat Covid-19 — who decides who lives or dies? We should NEVER have been in this position — we must never be in it again.
Any disruption to our supply chain will result in a surge in unemployment and mortgage defaults, and people won’t be able to feed their families. Civil unrest has already begun in Italy, and it will go viral globally.
Countries need to urgently review and categorize which industries are a matter of national security or, more simply put, are a matter of life or death to their citizens.
When I stood for a seat in last December’s UK Parliamentary elections, independence, restoration of democratic principles and liberty, and financial conservativism were the cornerstone issues guiding my campaign. Each nation state needs to rethink and recategorize its priorities. The health, safety and prosperity of the citizenry should be placed above identity politics, the toxicity of an entitled cancel culture and mob rule by social media. When taking a sober look at Brexit and my reasons for wanting to leave the European Union, Covid-19 provides a stark reminder that in order for a nation to survive and thrive, independence, not interdependence on supply chains should be priority number one. Covid-19 has illustrated how interdependence can cost lives.
$6 Trillion ‘rescue package,’ unaffordable bailouts and buybacks: Bend over, here it comes again!
Covid-19 has ravaged Italy where the death rate has been oscillating between 11% and 14%. These are the highest recorded mortality rates attributed to coronavirus during this crisis. This is an unprecedented humanitarian crisis.
They need help and they need it now. They called upon the EU, but the cries fell upon deaf ears. The only help came from Russia. Last time I looked, out of the 154 countries I reviewed in 2017, Italy’s GDP (Gross Domestic Product) growth over the previous 17 years was in the 152nd spot, right above Haiti and Zimbabwe. Italy has issued the most debt in the EU and owes around $4 trillion which, as I have been warning for years, Italy can never and will never repay. A default is imminent. The Great Financial crisis of 2008 caused Italy’s youth unemployment rate to skyrocket. By 2014, these numbers topped 42%, one of the highest in the EU, as Italy’s debt soared.
World Pop by Year[worldometers.info]
Year...World Pop..Yrly Chg/Net Chg/Density/Urban Pop/Urb Pop %
2020 7,794,798,739 1.05 % 81,330,639 52 4,378,993,944 56 %
2019 7,713,468,100 1.08 % 82,377,060 52 4,299,438,618 56 %
2018 7,631,091,040 1.10 % 83,232,115 51 4,219,817,318 55 %
2017 7,547,858,925 1.12 % 83,836,876 51 4,140,188,594 55 %
2016 7,464,022,049 1.14 % 84,224,910 50 4,060,652,683 54 %
2015 7,379,797,139 1.16 % 84,506,374 50 3,981,497,663 54 %
2014 7,295,290,765 1.17 % 84,708,789 49 3,902,831,934 53 %
2013 7,210,581,976 1.19 % 84,753,917 48 3,824,990,329 53 %
2012 7,125,828,059 1.20 % 84,633,758 48 3,747,842,586 53 %
2011 7,041,194,301 1.21 % 84,370,698 47 3,671,423,872 52 %
2010 6,956,823,603 1.22 % 84,056,510 47 3,594,868,146 52 %
2009 6,872,767,093 1.23 % 83,678,407 46 3,516,830,263 51 %
2008 6,789,088,686 1.24 % 83,142,076 46 3,439,719,128 51 %
2007 6,705,946,610 1.24 % 82,428,777 45 3,363,609,560 50 %
2006 6,623,517,833 1.25 % 81,610,806 44 3,289,446,226 50 %
2005 6,541,907,027 1.25 % 80,747,638 44 3,215,905,863 49 %
2004 6,461,159,389 1.25 % 79,974,275 43 3,143,044,892 49 %
2003 6,381,185,114 1.26 % 79,411,926 43 3,071,743,997 48 %
2002 6,301,773,188 1.27 % 79,146,582 42 3,001,808,223 48 %
2001 6,222,626,606 1.29 % 79,132,783 42 2,933,078,510 47 %
2000 6,143,493,823 1.31 % 79,254,768 41 2,868,307,513 47 %
1999 6,064,239,055 1.33 % 79,445,113 41 2,808,231,655 46 %
1998 5,984,793,942 1.35 % 79,748,154 40 2,749,213,598 46 %
1997 5,905,045,788 1.38 % 80,153,837 40 2,690,813,541 46 %
1996 5,824,891,951 1.40 % 80,678,972 39 2,632,941,583 45 %
1995 5,744,212,979 1.43 % 81,062,552 39 2,575,505,235 45 %
1994 5,663,150,427 1.46 % 81,552,881 38 2,518,254,111 44 %
1993 5,581,597,546 1.50 % 82,677,737 37 2,461,223,528 44 %
1992 5,498,919,809 1.56 % 84,630,365 37 2,404,337,297 44 %
1991 5,414,289,444 1.63 % 87,058,383 36 2,347,462,336 43 %
1990 5,327,231,061 1.71 % 89,789,503 36 2,290,228,096 43 %
1989 5,237,441,558 1.79 % 92,015,550 35 2,233,140,502 43 %
1988 5,145,426,008 1.84 % 92,903,861 35 2,176,126,537 42 %
1987 5,052,522,147 1.85 % 91,954,235 34 2,118,882,551 42 %
1986 4,960,567,912 1.84 % 89,646,172 33 2,062,604,394 42 %
1985 4,870,921,740 1.82 % 86,910,119 33 2,007,939,063 41 %
1984 4,784,011,621 1.80 % 84,442,317 32 1,955,106,433 41 %
1983 4,699,569,304 1.78 % 82,182,762 32 1,903,822,436 41 %
1982 4,617,386,542 1.77 % 80,389,780 31 1,854,134,229 40 %
1981 4,536,996,762 1.77 % 78,993,248 30 1,804,215,203 40 %
1980 4,458,003,514 1.77 % 77,497,414 30 1,754,201,029 39 %
1979 4,380,506,100 1.76 % 75,972,599 29 1,706,021,638 39 %
1978 4,304,533,501 1.77 % 75,027,441 29 1,659,306,117 39 %
1977 4,229,506,060 1.80 % 74,839,196 28 1,616,419,308 38 %
1976 4,154,666,864 1.84 % 75,186,258 28 1,577,376,141 38 %
1975 4,079,480,606 1.89 % 75,686,434 27 1,538,624,994 38 %
1974 4,003,794,172 1.94 % 76,013,934 27 1,501,134,655 37 %
1973 3,927,780,238 1.98 % 76,129,993 26 1,462,178,370 37 %
1972 3,851,650,245 2.01 % 75,890,628 26 1,424,734,781 37 %
1971 3,775,759,617 2.04 % 75,322,571 25 1,388,834,099 37 %
1970 3,700,437,046 2.06 % 74,756,419 25 1,354,215,496 37 %
1969 3,625,680,627 2.09 % 74,081,500 24 1,319,833,474 36 %
1968 3,551,599,127 2.09 % 72,829,165 24 1,285,933,432 36 %
1967 3,478,769,962 2.08 % 70,847,332 23 1,252,566,565 36 %
1966 3,407,922,630 2.05 % 68,339,033 23 1,219,993,032 36 %
1965 3,339,583,597 2.00 % 65,605,259 22 1,188,469,224 36 %
1964 3,273,978,338 1.96 % 62,977,329 22 1,157,813,355 35 %
1963 3,211,001,009 1.92 % 60,580,214 22 1,122,561,940 35 %
1962 3,150,420,795 1.89 % 58,577,288 21 1,088,376,703 35 %
1961 3,091,843,507 1.87 % 56,893,759 21 1,055,435,648 34 %
1960 3,034,949,748 1.86 % 55,373,563 20 1,023,845,517 34 %
1959 2,979,576,185 1.84 % 53,889,480 20 992,820,546 33 %
1958 2,925,686,705 1.82 % 52,380,615 20 962,537,113 33 %
1957 2,873,306,090 1.80 % 50,862,808 19 933,113,168 32 %
1956 2,822,443,282 1.78 % 49,423,346 19 904,685,164 32 %
1955 2,773,019,936 1.77 % 48,173,195 19 877,008,842 32 %
1954 2,724,846,741 1.76 % 47,237,781 18 850,179,106 31 %
1953 2,677,608,960 1.78 % 46,747,398 18 824,289,989 31 %
1952 2,630,861,562 1.81 % 46,827,301 18 799,282,533 30 %
1951 2,584,034,261 1.88 % 47,603,112 17 775,067,697 30 %
1927 2,000,000,000
1900 1,600,000,000
1850 1,200,000,000
1804 1,000,000,000
1760 770,000,000
1700 610,000,000
1600 500,000,000
1500 450,000,000
1400 350,000,000
1200 360,000,000
1100 320,000,000
1000 275,000,000
900 240,000,000
800 220,000,000
700 210,000,000
600 200,000,000
200 190,000,000
-200 150,000,000
-500 100,000,000
-1000 50,000,000
-2000 27,000,000
-3000 14,000,000
-4000 7,000,000
-5000 5,000,000
Tell it like it is.
2020-09-06 23:14:48 UTC
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Post by CLOISTER
https://www.rt.com/op-ed/485092-coronavirus-globalism-independence-supply/
By Mitchell Feierstein, investor, banker, and author of Planet Ponzi: How we got into this mess, what happens next, and how to protect yourself. He spends his time between London and Manhattan.
Globalism’s open borders and just-in-time supply chains have been providing cheap labor and products — but the coronavirus pandemic has shown us the huge cost of neglected independence.
Covid-19 has opened the kimono of globalism and what’s underneath is ugly.
The virus has illustrated the importance of, and our reliance on, just-in-time supply chains. Supply chains are only as strong as their weakest link. If any ingredient is missing from that supply chain, the nation controlling that commodity can break it, causing devastating economic, geopolitical and social consequences.
Post by CLOISTER
As scientists break down borders to fight Covid-19, nationalist leaders build them back upAs scientists break down borders to fight Covid-19, nationalist leaders build them back up
For example, take emergency medical supplies and critical drugs. Most antibiotics, as well as the main ingredients to produce them, are made in China. India has prohibited the export of hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug that President Trump touted as a “game changer” in the treatment of Coronavirus. Even basic over-the-counter drugs like paracetamol are “out-of-stock.” Hen’s teeth and capable Central Bankers seem easier to find than N95 facemasks, gloves, thermometers, pulse oximeters, hand sanitiser, and isopropyl alcohol. We also rely on other nations’ electrical parts to run critical infrastructure, trucks, trains, planes and automobiles.
The imposition of national export bans on medical supply chain ingredients is a wakeup call for every nation state that has become reliant upon other nations for products they no longer produce domestically. Scarcity of critical commodities and medical supplies needs to be part of every National Security dialogue. People's lives depend upon the unrestricted access to and supply of these drugs, medical products and equipment, which today, thanks to 30 years of neoliberal globalism, are now beyond our control. We need to rebuild this infrastructure and become self-sufficient in providing necessities. Right now, we don't have the ventilators or drugs required to combat and treat Covid-19 — who decides who lives or dies? We should NEVER have been in this position — we must never be in it again.
Any disruption to our supply chain will result in a surge in unemployment and mortgage defaults, and people won’t be able to feed their families. Civil unrest has already begun in Italy, and it will go viral globally.
Countries need to urgently review and categorize which industries are a matter of national security or, more simply put, are a matter of life or death to their citizens.
When I stood for a seat in last December’s UK Parliamentary elections, independence, restoration of democratic principles and liberty, and financial conservativism were the cornerstone issues guiding my campaign. Each nation state needs to rethink and recategorize its priorities. The health, safety and prosperity of the citizenry should be placed above identity politics, the toxicity of an entitled cancel culture and mob rule by social media. When taking a sober look at Brexit and my reasons for wanting to leave the European Union, Covid-19 provides a stark reminder that in order for a nation to survive and thrive, independence, not interdependence on supply chains should be priority number one. Covid-19 has illustrated how interdependence can cost lives.
$6 Trillion ‘rescue package,’ unaffordable bailouts and buybacks: Bend over, here it comes again!
Covid-19 has ravaged Italy where the death rate has been oscillating between 11% and 14%. These are the highest recorded mortality rates attributed to coronavirus during this crisis. This is an unprecedented humanitarian crisis.
They need help and they need it now. They called upon the EU, but the cries fell upon deaf ears. The only help came from Russia. Last time I looked, out of the 154 countries I reviewed in 2017, Italy’s GDP (Gross Domestic Product) growth over the previous 17 years was in the 152nd spot, right above Haiti and Zimbabwe. Italy has issued the most debt in the EU and owes around $4 trillion which, as I have been warning for years, Italy can never and will never repay. A default is imminent. The Great Financial crisis of 2008 caused Italy’s youth unemployment rate to skyrocket. By 2014, these numbers topped 42%, one of the highest in the EU, as Italy’s debt soared.
"Covid 19 has opened the kimono"ha ha ha ha ha ha ha of "GLOBALISM."
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