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The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
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d***@agent.com
2018-11-07 18:50:23 UTC
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The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal

If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?

One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.

In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young. If you made it past childhood,
however, you might well live into your 60s or beyond. In today’s
hunter-gatherer cultures, whose way of life is closer to that of our
prehistoric ancestors, it’s fairly common for people to live into
their 70s. That is in striking contrast to our closest primate
relatives, chimpanzees, who very rarely live past their 50s.

There seem to be uniquely human genetic adaptations that keep us going
into old age and help to guard against cognitive decline. This
suggests that the later decades of our lives are there for a reason.
Human beings are uniquely cultural animals; we crucially depend on the
discoveries of earlier generations. And older people are well suited
to passing on their accumulated knowledge and wisdom to the next
generation.

Building Bridges Across the Generational Divide

Michael Gurven, an anthropologist at the University of California,
Santa Barbara, and his colleagues have been studying aging among the
Tsimane, a group in the Bolivian Amazon. The Tsimane live in a way
that is more like the way we all lived in the past, through hunting,
gathering and small-scale farming of local foods, with relatively
little schooling or contact with markets and cities. Many Tsimane are
in their 60s or 70s, and some even make it to their 80s.

In a 2017 paper in the journal Developmental Psychology, Prof. Gurven
and colleagues gave over 900 Tsimane people a battery of cognitive
tasks. Older members of the group had a lot of trouble doing things
like remembering a list of new words. But the researchers also asked
their subjects to quickly name as many different kinds of fish or
plants as they could. This ability improved as the Tsimane got older,
peaking around age 40 and staying high even in old age.

Research on Western urban societies has produced similar findings.
This suggests that our cognitive strengths and weaknesses change as we
age, rather than just undergoing a general decline. Things like
short-term memory and processing speed—what’s called “fluid
intelligence”—peak in our 20s and decline precipitously in older age.
But “crystallized intelligence”—how much we actually know, and how
well we can access that knowledge—improves up to middle age, and then
declines much more slowly, if at all.

So when I forget what happened yesterday but can tell my grandchildren
and students vivid stories about what happened 40 years ago, I may not
be falling apart after all. Instead, I may be doing just what
evolution intended.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
mg
2018-11-07 22:12:28 UTC
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Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?

Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?

Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?




------------------------------
The middle class is a milk cow
with millions of tits.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-11-07 23:39:39 UTC
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Post by mg
Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?
Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?
Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?
The Federal Government of course has been raiding SS
for a long time. SS has no control over the government
doing that, and the government doesn't seem anxious to
pay SS back, or even to acknowledge clearly that it knows
it owes the money.
Post by mg
------------------------------
The middle class is a milk cow
with millions of tits.
El Castor
2018-11-08 08:46:46 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?
Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?
Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?
The Federal Government of course has been raiding SS
for a long time. SS has no control over the government
doing that, and the government doesn't seem anxious to
pay SS back, or even to acknowledge clearly that it knows
it owes the money.
Nonsense. It is true that surpluses in the SS Trust Fund are invested
in non-negotiable treasury bonds. Does that constitute "raiding". No.
In what way does the government refuse to acknowledge that it owes the
money? It doesn't.
mg
2018-11-08 14:42:04 UTC
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Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?
Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?
Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?
The Federal Government of course has been raiding SS
for a long time. SS has no control over the government
doing that, and the government doesn't seem anxious to
pay SS back, or even to acknowledge clearly that it knows
it owes the money.
I think the current estimate is for SS to run out of funds (including
the trust fund) in 2032. I used to figure that maybe I would live that
long, but lately I'm thinking that its not very likely. I heard a
really awful story about all the pain an acquaintenance had with brain
cancer before he died. Obviously dying isn't always easy and sometimes
it can be a nightmare.
rumpelstiltskin
2018-11-08 15:32:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by mg
Post by rumpelstiltskin
Post by mg
Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?
Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?
Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?
The Federal Government of course has been raiding SS
for a long time. SS has no control over the government
doing that, and the government doesn't seem anxious to
pay SS back, or even to acknowledge clearly that it knows
it owes the money.
I think the current estimate is for SS to run out of funds (including
the trust fund) in 2032. I used to figure that maybe I would live that
long, but lately I'm thinking that its not very likely. I heard a
really awful story about all the pain an acquaintenance had with brain
cancer before he died. Obviously dying isn't always easy and sometimes
it can be a nightmare.
Brain cancer sure isn't an easy way to go.

My first close friend, the girl who lived
right across the street from me in England,
died of cancer at age 28, leaving a husband
and two kids. I didn't see her much after
age 5 when I left England, though I did see
her on visits up to and during my teenaged
years. When we were teenagers, she was
busy being a wild girl at the clubs, and I
was busy playing football and cricket with a
boy with whom I was secretly in love. She
made overtures to me that indicated she'd
be interested in a physical relationship, but
I guess she sensed that wasn't in the cards.
Whether or not she sensed I was in love
with the boy I was hanging out with, I
couldn't say, but my guess is that she did.
El Castor
2018-11-08 09:22:47 UTC
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Permalink
Post by mg
Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?
Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?
Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.

""Life expectancy has been increasing pretty steadily for the last 50
years or so," said Robert Anderson, chief of the Mortality Statistics
Branch at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
Life expectancy has been increasing for several reasons, Anderson
said. But, he added, "improvements in heart disease and stroke
mortality have had a big impact. That's a large proportion of total
deaths and that's where the action really is in terms of improved life
expectancy. That's really what's driving the trend.""
https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/news/20140106/americans-living-longer-than-ever-cdc#1
mg
2018-11-08 14:53:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 01:22:47 -0800, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by mg
Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?
Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?
Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
""Life expectancy has been increasing pretty steadily for the last 50
years or so," said Robert Anderson, chief of the Mortality Statistics
Branch at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
Life expectancy has been increasing for several reasons, Anderson
said. But, he added, "improvements in heart disease and stroke
mortality have had a big impact. That's a large proportion of total
deaths and that's where the action really is in terms of improved life
expectancy. That's really what's driving the trend.""
https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/news/20140106/americans-living-longer-than-ever-cdc#1
According to the reference that I quoted, the
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
El Castor
2018-11-08 18:59:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by mg
On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 01:22:47 -0800, El Castor
Post by El Castor
Post by mg
Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?
Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?
Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
""Life expectancy has been increasing pretty steadily for the last 50
years or so," said Robert Anderson, chief of the Mortality Statistics
Branch at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
Life expectancy has been increasing for several reasons, Anderson
said. But, he added, "improvements in heart disease and stroke
mortality have had a big impact. That's a large proportion of total
deaths and that's where the action really is in terms of improved life
expectancy. That's really what's driving the trend.""
https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/news/20140106/americans-living-longer-than-ever-cdc#1
According to the reference that I quoted, the
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
That's why the source I quoted specified that we are living longer,
not just because of fewer deaths in childhood, but because
"improvements in heart disease and stroke mortality have had a big
impact. That's a large proportion of total deaths and that's where the
action really is in terms of improved life expectancy. That's really
what's driving the trend."

So, what are you getting at? Here's what I think about SS. It was sold
as a self sustaining, self funded, retirement program -- not as
welfare for the elderly financed by a tax on the working population,
but that appears to be what it has become. When I saved for my
retirement I invested largely in equities because I wanted a return
that was superior to the meager return on treasury bonds. SS
contributions go largely to fund current retirees (you and me), and
what is left over is "invested" in treasuries -- a crappy place to put
your money, IMHO, but arguably the only place for it to go. SS is
another social program built on a foundation of sand. Time to pay the
piper. The only question is, who will pay the bill. Probably, those
who can, and we all know who that is.

So, what are you getting at?
islander
2018-11-08 15:26:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by El Castor
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
Don't forget those who retired early because of the disastrous effect of
the Great Recession on older workers.
El Castor
2018-11-08 18:10:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
Don't forget those who retired early because of the disastrous effect of
the Great Recession on older workers.
OK, that too.
islander
2018-11-09 15:05:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
Don't forget those who retired early because of the disastrous effect of
the Great Recession on older workers.
OK, that too.
It would be interesting to see if this is a persistent problem of
employment of an aging work force. If so, we are losing experienced
workers permanently and the participation rate will continue to
stagnate. It might also explain why old white men are not happy with
the recovery.
El Castor
2018-11-09 20:20:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
Don't forget those who retired early because of the disastrous effect of
the Great Recession on older workers.
OK, that too.
It would be interesting to see if this is a persistent problem of
employment of an aging work force. If so, we are losing experienced
workers permanently and the participation rate will continue to
stagnate. It might also explain why old white men are not happy with
the recovery.
I retired at 57, and my wife at 55. Not because we had to, but because
we were able, and wanted to. Never regretted it. Here's a web site
devoted to retiring at 40!
https://retireby40.org/

The world is evolving. AI is everywhere, displacing jobs right and
left, and getting increasingly important by the day. What happens when
human intelligence is surpassed and AI begins designing itself? The
next step in evolution?
Bill Bowden
2018-11-10 00:50:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
Don't forget those who retired early because of the disastrous effect of
the Great Recession on older workers.
OK, that too.
It would be interesting to see if this is a persistent problem of
employment of an aging work force. If so, we are losing experienced
workers permanently and the participation rate will continue to
stagnate. It might also explain why old white men are not happy with
the recovery.
I'm looking for a job. At my present rate of expenses, I will be broke in
10 years. But I could live in a bedroom of a house for about $500 a month
and not drive. Social Security would pay for that plus food. And I get free
health care at the VA. I need to save about 5K to pay for my funeral
expenses and burial in a national cemetary. But I rhink I'll like my new jpb
whatever it is as long as I can sit down. I can':t stand up for more than 15
minutes.










































FG
El Castor
2018-11-10 07:24:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 16:50:49 -0800, "Bill Bowden"
Post by Bill Bowden
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
Don't forget those who retired early because of the disastrous effect
of
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
the Great Recession on older workers.
OK, that too.
It would be interesting to see if this is a persistent problem of
employment of an aging work force. If so, we are losing experienced
workers permanently and the participation rate will continue to
stagnate. It might also explain why old white men are not happy with
the recovery.
I'm looking for a job. At my present rate of expenses, I will be broke in
10 years. But I could live in a bedroom of a house for about $500 a month
and not drive. Social Security would pay for that plus food. And I get free
health care at the VA. I need to save about 5K to pay for my funeral
expenses and burial in a national cemetary. But I rhink I'll like my new jpb
whatever it is as long as I can sit down. I can':t stand up for more than 15
minutes.
I think you're going to find cheaper rent somewhere other than
California. Maybe subsidized?

Texas? Nevada? Maybe Oregon, Arizona, New Mexico
https://www.apartmenthomeliving.com
b***@gmail.com
2018-11-12 13:01:17 UTC
Reply
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Post by El Castor
On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 16:50:49 -0800, "Bill Bowden"
Post by Bill Bowden
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
Don't forget those who retired early because of the disastrous effect
of
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
the Great Recession on older workers.
OK, that too.
It would be interesting to see if this is a persistent problem of
employment of an aging work force. If so, we are losing experienced
workers permanently and the participation rate will continue to
stagnate. It might also explain why old white men are not happy with
the recovery.
I'm looking for a job. At my present rate of expenses, I will be broke in
10 years. But I could live in a bedroom of a house for about $500 a month
and not drive. Social Security would pay for that plus food. And I get free
health care at the VA. I need to save about 5K to pay for my funeral
expenses and burial in a national cemetary. But I rhink I'll like my new jpb
whatever it is as long as I can sit down. I can':t stand up for more than 15
minutes.
I think you're going to find cheaper rent somewhere other than
California. Maybe subsidized?
Texas? Nevada? Maybe Oregon, Arizona, New Mexico
https://www.apartmenthomeliving.com
Yes, I thought about Texas. My niece lives in San Antonio in a 5 bedroom house and pays no state income tax. Unfortunately, she is getting a divorce at age 48. She is the last person I thought would ever get a divorce. Wemen are that way, they have to move on at age 30-50. That's why I never got married. It would only end in divorce.
El Castor
2018-11-12 20:29:50 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by El Castor
On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 16:50:49 -0800, "Bill Bowden"
Post by Bill Bowden
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
In short, people ARE in fact living longer, but not working longer.
Contributions that were sufficient 50 years ago, are no longer enough
to fund a longer average retirement. Also, the problem is being
exacerbated by retirement of a large numbers of baby boomers that have
begun to significantly swell the number of retirees.
Don't forget those who retired early because of the disastrous effect
of
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
Post by islander
the Great Recession on older workers.
OK, that too.
It would be interesting to see if this is a persistent problem of
employment of an aging work force. If so, we are losing experienced
workers permanently and the participation rate will continue to
stagnate. It might also explain why old white men are not happy with
the recovery.
I'm looking for a job. At my present rate of expenses, I will be broke in
10 years. But I could live in a bedroom of a house for about $500 a month
and not drive. Social Security would pay for that plus food. And I get free
health care at the VA. I need to save about 5K to pay for my funeral
expenses and burial in a national cemetary. But I rhink I'll like my new jpb
whatever it is as long as I can sit down. I can':t stand up for more than 15
minutes.
I think you're going to find cheaper rent somewhere other than
California. Maybe subsidized?
Texas? Nevada? Maybe Oregon, Arizona, New Mexico
https://www.apartmenthomeliving.com
Yes, I thought about Texas. My niece lives in San Antonio in a 5 bedroom house and pays no state income tax. Unfortunately, she is getting a divorce at age 48. She is the last person I thought would ever get a divorce. Wemen are that way, they have to move on at age 30-50. That's why I never got married. It would only end in divorce.
I've been married 42 years and still going strong, but you never.
Remember Dr Laura? Her advice was to never marry anyone you haven't
known for at least 2 years. Good advice.

Anyhow, back in the day, I used to fly out to Houston on business.
Always liked Texas. I used apartmenthomeliving.com to look for $500
(or less) Texas studios and one bedrooms and found a bunch. Might be
worth considering. I think you'd find Texas more affordable in other
ways than California.

w***@gmail.com
2018-11-08 13:29:37 UTC
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Post by mg
Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young.
<snip>
Post by d***@agent.com
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
So, what does that mean in regard to Social Security, for instance?
Has someone been fibbing to us about the reason that SS is insolvent?
Or, have they been oversymplifying, or exaggerating?
Is there another reason why SS is going broke besides the one that we
have been hearing for many years? Is there another reason that SS is
going broke besides the fact that we are "living longer"? If so, what
is it?
Could that reason be because people are making less money now days
than they used to? If not, what is the reason?
"At the end of 2014, the Trust Fund contained (or alternatively, was owed) $2.79 trillion, up $25 billion from 2013. The Trust Fund is required by law to be invested in non-marketable securities issued and guaranteed by the "full faith and credit" of the federal government."
mg
2018-11-08 14:29:02 UTC
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Post by d***@agent.com
The Cognitive Advantages of Growing Older
The later decades of our lives are there for a good evolutionary
reason
By Alison Gopnik, Nov. 2, 2018, Wall St. Journal
If, like me, you’re on the wrong side of sixty, you’ve probably
noticed those increasingly frequent and sinister “senior moments.”
What was I looking for when I came into the kitchen? Did I already
take out the trash? What’s old what’s-his-name’s name again?
One possible reaction to aging is resignation: You’re just past your
expiration date. You may have heard that centuries ago the average
life expectancy was only around 40 years. So you might think that
modern medicine and nutrition are keeping us going past our
evolutionary limit. No wonder the machine starts to break down.
In fact, recent research suggests a very different picture. The
shorter average life expectancy of the past mainly reflects the fact
that many more children died young. If you made it past childhood,
however, you might well live into your 60s or beyond. In today’s
hunter-gatherer cultures, whose way of life is closer to that of our
prehistoric ancestors, it’s fairly common for people to live into
their 70s. That is in striking contrast to our closest primate
relatives, chimpanzees, who very rarely live past their 50s.
There seem to be uniquely human genetic adaptations that keep us going
into old age and help to guard against cognitive decline. This
suggests that the later decades of our lives are there for a reason.
Human beings are uniquely cultural animals; we crucially depend on the
discoveries of earlier generations. And older people are well suited
to passing on their accumulated knowledge and wisdom to the next
generation.
Building Bridges Across the Generational Divide
Michael Gurven, an anthropologist at the University of California,
Santa Barbara, and his colleagues have been studying aging among the
Tsimane, a group in the Bolivian Amazon. The Tsimane live in a way
that is more like the way we all lived in the past, through hunting,
gathering and small-scale farming of local foods, with relatively
little schooling or contact with markets and cities. Many Tsimane are
in their 60s or 70s, and some even make it to their 80s.
In a 2017 paper in the journal Developmental Psychology, Prof. Gurven
and colleagues gave over 900 Tsimane people a battery of cognitive
tasks. Older members of the group had a lot of trouble doing things
like remembering a list of new words. But the researchers also asked
their subjects to quickly name as many different kinds of fish or
plants as they could. This ability improved as the Tsimane got older,
peaking around age 40 and staying high even in old age.
Research on Western urban societies has produced similar findings.
This suggests that our cognitive strengths and weaknesses change as we
age, rather than just undergoing a general decline. Things like
short-term memory and processing speed—what’s called “fluid
intelligence”—peak in our 20s and decline precipitously in older age.
But “crystallized intelligence”—how much we actually know, and how
well we can access that knowledge—improves up to middle age, and then
declines much more slowly, if at all.
So when I forget what happened yesterday but can tell my grandchildren
and students vivid stories about what happened 40 years ago, I may not
be falling apart after all. Instead, I may be doing just what
evolution intended.
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cognitive-advantages-of-growing-older-1541170622
I'm scoring one for Donald and zero for the cess-pool people in
Washington.




-------------------------------------
The United States is now an oligarchy
in which unlimited political bribery
has created a complete subversion of
our political system as a payoff to
major contributors.
--Jimmy Carter
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