Discussion:
I can remember when you could go to a state college in California for FREE
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GLOBALIST
2018-04-06 21:27:12 UTC
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https://www.westernjournal.com/california-hikes-tuition-on-citizens-exempts-illegals/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=PositivelyRepublican&utm_campaign=prp&utm_content=2018-04-02
El Castor
2018-04-07 08:09:17 UTC
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On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 14:27:12 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
https://www.westernjournal.com/california-hikes-tuition-on-citizens-exempts-illegals/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=PositivelyRepublican&utm_campaign=prp&utm_content=2018-04-02
I graduated from UC Berkeley in the 60's. Tuition was literally almost
free, and books were just books. The student loan, designed to make
college affordable, has resulted in a situation in which the cost of a
college education has increased at a pace that parallels the ability
to pay for it. There is no reason that college should not be virtually
free and exist on-line.
islander
2018-04-07 13:53:44 UTC
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Post by El Castor
On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 14:27:12 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
https://www.westernjournal.com/california-hikes-tuition-on-citizens-exempts-illegals/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=PositivelyRepublican&utm_campaign=prp&utm_content=2018-04-02
I graduated from UC Berkeley in the 60's. Tuition was literally almost
free, and books were just books. The student loan, designed to make
college affordable, has resulted in a situation in which the cost of a
college education has increased at a pace that parallels the ability
to pay for it. There is no reason that college should not be virtually
free and exist on-line.
I tend to agree, but relying solely on on-line access loses the social
interaction that happens on campus. Before I retired, I participated in
a proposal that emphasized life-long education where the initial part
occurred on-campus and phased into on-line access over a relatively
short period of time (IIRC the initial phase was 2 years). There were
some benefits to that approach in avoiding isolation of students. We
were way ahead of what was possible technically at the time, but I've
noticed that some of the on-line education has incorporated local study
groups in an attempt to improve social interaction.

On-line education clearly has enormous potential for reducing cost, but
it also offers something even more valuable IMV. Much of education
involves exposure to basic knowledge that persists for a very long time.
Having educators produce that material in a form that is widely and
inexpensively available creates an interesting open market for
knowledge. Wouldn't it be great to be able to compare and contrast the
views of the best minds on any given topic rather than just rely on the
professor that you happened to draw at your university? Then, wouldn't
it be great to be able to tap that specific bit of knowledge that you
need on the job years later, produced by the best experts in the field?

We don't even need to keep the rigid quarter or semester constraints on
education if we transition away from the campus. Knowledge in the form
of a finer granularity of study allows a much more flexible way to
learn, more closely matching the material, and allowing efficient access
of knowledge over the course of your life.
El Castor
2018-04-07 16:31:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by islander
Post by El Castor
On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 14:27:12 -0700 (PDT), GLOBALIST
Post by GLOBALIST
https://www.westernjournal.com/california-hikes-tuition-on-citizens-exempts-illegals/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=PositivelyRepublican&utm_campaign=prp&utm_content=2018-04-02
I graduated from UC Berkeley in the 60's. Tuition was literally almost
free, and books were just books. The student loan, designed to make
college affordable, has resulted in a situation in which the cost of a
college education has increased at a pace that parallels the ability
to pay for it. There is no reason that college should not be virtually
free and exist on-line.
I tend to agree, but relying solely on on-line access loses the social
interaction that happens on campus. Before I retired, I participated in
a proposal that emphasized life-long education where the initial part
occurred on-campus and phased into on-line access over a relatively
short period of time (IIRC the initial phase was 2 years). There were
some benefits to that approach in avoiding isolation of students. We
were way ahead of what was possible technically at the time, but I've
noticed that some of the on-line education has incorporated local study
groups in an attempt to improve social interaction.
On-line education clearly has enormous potential for reducing cost, but
it also offers something even more valuable IMV. Much of education
involves exposure to basic knowledge that persists for a very long time.
Having educators produce that material in a form that is widely and
inexpensively available creates an interesting open market for
knowledge. Wouldn't it be great to be able to compare and contrast the
views of the best minds on any given topic rather than just rely on the
professor that you happened to draw at your university? Then, wouldn't
it be great to be able to tap that specific bit of knowledge that you
need on the job years later, produced by the best experts in the field?
We don't even need to keep the rigid quarter or semester constraints on
education if we transition away from the campus. Knowledge in the form
of a finer granularity of study allows a much more flexible way to
learn, more closely matching the material, and allowing efficient access
of knowledge over the course of your life.
I agree about the social aspect. What we need is imagination and
creativity applied to the problem, but I fear that the education
establishment feels threatened, and perhaps rightly so, and will
therefore resist any large scale change. The auditoriums and marble
columns will be with us for awhile.

I noticed something interesting in OCS. We were subjected to reams of
rote learning -- the kind of thing that occupies most of the first
couple of years of college -- basic celestial navigation, the rules of
the road at sea -- facts that don't require a learned professor
imparting his knowledge aquired over a lifetime of study. We were all
college graduates, but the ones from well known big name schools were
noticably better at absorbing the material. Maybe smarter, more
disciplined -- no idea.

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