Discussion:
Lived in Texas - You will get it!
(too old to reply)
jimstevens
2006-08-29 16:08:11 UTC
Permalink
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the
air.

There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.

There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a
few no one has ever seen before.

Raccoons will test your melon crop, and let you know when they are
ripe.

If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!

Nothing will kill a mesquite tree.

There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.

A tractor is NOT an all terrain vehicle. They do get stuck.

The wind blows at 90 mph from Oct 2 till June 25; then it stops
totally until October 2.

Onced and twiced are words.

Coldbeer is one word

People actually grow and eat okra.

Green grass DOES burn.

When you live in the country you don't have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.

The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first
few weeks.

When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it's time to see a
doctor.

Fix-in-to is one word.

There ain't no such thing as "lunch". There is only breakfast, dinner
and then there's supper.

"Sweetened ice tea" is appropriate for all meals, and you start
drinking it when you are two. You also give it to babies for
colic..Just a tid-bit.

"Backwards and forwards" means I know everything about you.

"Jeet?" is actually a phrase meaning, "Did you eat?"

You don't have to wear a watch because it doesn't matter what time it
is. You work until you're done, or it's too dark to see.

You measure distance in minutes or hours.

You can switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day.

Stores don't have bags. They have sacks.

You see cars with the engine running in the Wal-mart parking lot with
no one in them, no matter what time of the year.

All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.

You install security lights on your house and garage, and leave both
unlocked.

You carry jumper cables for your own car.

You know what "cow tipping" and "snipe hunting" are.

You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and
Tabasco.

You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.

The local papers cover national and international news on one page,
but require six pages to cover Friday night high school football.

The first day of deer season is a state holiday.

You find 100 degrees a "tad" warm.

The four seasons are: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.

You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.

Going to Wal-mart is a favorite past-time known as "goin Wal-Martin"
or "off to Wally-world".

You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.

A carbonated soft drink isn't a soda, cola, or pop....It's a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.

Texans understand these jokes. If you do too, forward them to your
friends from Texas. If you don't just come and stay awhile.
Harry Thompson
2006-08-29 16:19:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.
70 degrees? We had our first rain in weeks and the temperature dropped to
the cool 90s. It's almost paradise.
AndyS
2006-08-29 16:42:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry Thompson
Post by jimstevens
You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.
70 degrees? We had our first rain in weeks and the temperature dropped to
the cool 90s. It's almost paradise.
Andy writes:

True... I went outside and washed all our windows this morning, taking
advantage of the cold weather

Andy in Eureka, Texas
rg
2006-08-31 03:08:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the
air.
And we eat em if we can catch em.
Post by jimstevens
There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.
We eat them too.
Post by jimstevens
There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a
few no one has ever seen before.
Raccoons will test your melon crop, and let you know when they are
ripe.
If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!
Nothing will kill a mesquite tree.
There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.
Varmints
Post by jimstevens
A tractor is NOT an all terrain vehicle. They do get stuck.
And you can drive one to school if the truck won't start.
Post by jimstevens
The wind blows at 90 mph from Oct 2 till June 25; then it stops
totally until October 2.
Onced and twiced are words.
Coldbeer is one word
People actually grow and eat okra.
And it's very good.
Post by jimstevens
Green grass DOES burn.
When you live in the country you don't have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.
The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first
few weeks.
When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it's time to see a
doctor.
Fix-in-to is one word.
There ain't no such thing as "lunch". There is only breakfast, dinner
and then there's supper.
"Sweetened ice tea" is appropriate for all meals, and you start
drinking it when you are two. You also give it to babies for
colic..Just a tid-bit.
"Backwards and forwards" means I know everything about you.
And we say it like I spell it....backerds and ferwerds.
Post by jimstevens
"Jeet?" is actually a phrase meaning, "Did you eat?"
You don't have to wear a watch because it doesn't matter what time it
is. You work until you're done, or it's too dark to see.
You measure distance in minutes or hours.
And if it is hours away, it's called a ferpiece. If it's minutes away then
it is over yonder.
Post by jimstevens
You can switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day.
And back again.
Post by jimstevens
Stores don't have bags. They have sacks.
You see cars with the engine running in the Wal-mart parking lot with
no one in them, no matter what time of the year.
Unlocked!

If an out of stater tries to steal it, you're likely to git shot.
Post by jimstevens
All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.
And we can em and they are delicious.
Post by jimstevens
You install security lights on your house and garage, and leave both
unlocked.
We didn't name em. The security company did.
Post by jimstevens
You carry jumper cables for your own car.
You know what "cow tipping" and "snipe hunting" are.
You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and
Tabasco.
You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.
The local papers cover national and international news on one page,
but require six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
That is absolutely true.
Post by jimstevens
The first day of deer season is a state holiday.
You find 100 degrees a "tad" warm.
The four seasons are: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.
You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.
Going to Wal-mart is a favorite past-time known as "goin Wal-Martin"
or "off to Wally-world".
Great place for a family reunion.
Post by jimstevens
You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.
A carbonated soft drink isn't a soda, cola, or pop....It's a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.
We just say what kind of Coke we want.
There's Dr Pepper, Sprite and Tab.
Post by jimstevens
Texans understand these jokes. If you do too, forward them to your
friends from Texas. If you don't just come and stay awhile.
rg
jimstevens
2006-08-31 03:40:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by rg
Post by jimstevens
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the
air.
And we eat em if we can catch em.
Post by jimstevens
There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.
We eat them too.
Post by jimstevens
There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a
few no one has ever seen before.
Raccoons will test your melon crop, and let you know when they are
ripe.
If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!
Nothing will kill a mesquite tree.
There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.
Varmints
Post by jimstevens
A tractor is NOT an all terrain vehicle. They do get stuck.
And you can drive one to school if the truck won't start.
Post by jimstevens
The wind blows at 90 mph from Oct 2 till June 25; then it stops
totally until October 2.
Onced and twiced are words.
Coldbeer is one word
People actually grow and eat okra.
And it's very good.
Roll in cornmeal and fry.
Add into any gumbo.

How do you eat em.
Post by rg
Post by jimstevens
Green grass DOES burn.
When you live in the country you don't have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.
The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first
few weeks.
When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it's time to see a
doctor.
Fix-in-to is one word.
There ain't no such thing as "lunch". There is only breakfast, dinner
and then there's supper.
"Sweetened ice tea" is appropriate for all meals, and you start
drinking it when you are two. You also give it to babies for
colic..Just a tid-bit.
"Backwards and forwards" means I know everything about you.
And we say it like I spell it....backerds and ferwerds.
Post by jimstevens
"Jeet?" is actually a phrase meaning, "Did you eat?"
You don't have to wear a watch because it doesn't matter what time it
is. You work until you're done, or it's too dark to see.
You measure distance in minutes or hours.
And if it is hours away, it's called a ferpiece. If it's minutes away then
it is over yonder.
Post by jimstevens
You can switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day.
And back again.
Post by jimstevens
Stores don't have bags. They have sacks.
You see cars with the engine running in the Wal-mart parking lot with
no one in them, no matter what time of the year.
Unlocked!
If an out of stater tries to steal it, you're likely to git shot.
Post by jimstevens
All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.
And we can em and they are delicious.
Post by jimstevens
You install security lights on your house and garage, and leave both
unlocked.
We didn't name em. The security company did.
Post by jimstevens
You carry jumper cables for your own car.
You know what "cow tipping" and "snipe hunting" are.
You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and
Tabasco.
You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.
The local papers cover national and international news on one page,
but require six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
That is absolutely true.
Post by jimstevens
The first day of deer season is a state holiday.
You find 100 degrees a "tad" warm.
The four seasons are: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.
You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.
Going to Wal-mart is a favorite past-time known as "goin Wal-Martin"
or "off to Wally-world".
Great place for a family reunion.
Post by jimstevens
You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.
A carbonated soft drink isn't a soda, cola, or pop....It's a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.
We just say what kind of Coke we want.
There's Dr Pepper, Sprite and Tab.
Post by jimstevens
Texans understand these jokes. If you do too, forward them to your
friends from Texas. If you don't just come and stay awhile.
rg
Florida
2006-08-31 13:56:31 UTC
Permalink
We live in rural NC and identify with just a few items on your list,
what with us being so far north and all. Plus the Old Dude usually
points out that Tejas is the size of France so of course it will have a
distinctive national character.
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the air.
Sure, they're easy to catch, but do they really taste good?
There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.
That must make for some very complicated, very big warning posters
in the schools.
There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a
few no one has ever seen before.
What is it all those spiders are eating? Around here we have more
than enough bugs to satisfy all our spider types.
Raccoons will test your melon crop, and let you know when they are ripe.
If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!
These two sound like the warnings given to visitors to Australia.
Nothing will kill a mesquite tree.
So I guess that means you've already tried kidzu.
There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.
Omigawd! WHAT reasons? Whatever happened to a friendly shotgun
blast into the driveway dirt in front of the visitor's vehickle?
People actually grow and eat okra.
Well, of course we do. Deepfried okry is a basic food.
Green grass DOES burn.
Not in the wetter parts of NC. Sometimes cut wood won't burn
without help.
When you live in the country you don't have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.
Sure do. A fella made the news a couple of years ago by taking the
dogs back to
The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first
few weeks.
Ditto the neighbors' <expletive> dogs. (All neighbors have dogs,
city, town, and country.)
When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it's time to see a doctor.
Fix-in-to is one word.
There ain't no such thing as "lunch". There is only breakfast, dinner
and then there's supper.
"Sweetened ice tea" is appropriate for all meals, and you start
drinking it when you are two. You also give it to babies for colic..
Just a tid-bit.
Sure do. And displaced yanquis like us can tell the difference
between caffeinated kids and non-caffeinated, having seen both types.
"Backwards and forwards" means I know everything about you.
"Jeet?" is actually a phrase meaning, "Did you eat?"
You don't have to wear a watch because it doesn't matter what time it
is. You work until you're done, or it's too dark to see.
You measure distance in minutes or hours.
You can switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day.
Stores don't have bags. They have sacks.
You see cars with the engine running in the Wal-mart parking lot with
no one in them, no matter what time of the year.
All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.
You install security lights on your house and garage, and leave both
unlocked.
You carry jumper cables for your own car.
You know what "cow tipping" and "snipe hunting" are.
You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and
Tabasco.
Almost. We have Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and Texas Pete, made in
Winston-Salem.
You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.
The local papers cover national and international news on one page,
but require six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
The first day of deer season is a state holiday.
You find 100 degrees a "tad" warm.
The four seasons are: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.
You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.
Going to Wal-mart is a favorite past-time known as "goin Wal-Martin"
or "off to Wally-world".
You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.
A carbonated soft drink isn't a soda, cola, or pop....It's a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.
Around here, any c.s.d. is a "co-cola", at least to the old timers.
Texans understand these jokes. If you do too, forward them to your
friends from Texas. If you don't just come and stay awhile.
Like to, but y'all are going to have to do something about those
spiders first...
jimstevens
2006-08-31 19:40:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Florida
We live in rural NC and identify with just a few items on your list,
what with us being so far north and all. Plus the Old Dude usually
points out that Tejas is the size of France so of course it will have a
distinctive national character.
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the air.
Sure, they're easy to catch, but do they really taste good?
Of course - taste like chicken.
Post by Florida
There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.
That must make for some very complicated, very big warning posters
in the schools.
Naaaa, only poster needed is regular snake round-up or rodeo.
Post by Florida
There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a
few no one has ever seen before.
What is it all those spiders are eating? Around here we have more
than enough bugs to satisfy all our spider types.
North Carolinians
Post by Florida
Raccoons will test your melon crop, and let you know when they are ripe.
If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!
These two sound like the warnings given to visitors to Australia.
Send tenderfeet to Australia.
Post by Florida
Nothing will kill a mesquite tree.
So I guess that means you've already tried kidzu.
How do you cook it?
Post by Florida
There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.
Omigawd! WHAT reasons? Whatever happened to a friendly shotgun
blast into the driveway dirt in front of the visitor's vehickle?
Darn good reasons
Post by Florida
People actually grow and eat okra.
Well, of course we do. Deepfried okry is a basic food.
Maybe you have some promise after all
Post by Florida
Green grass DOES burn.
Not in the wetter parts of NC. Sometimes cut wood won't burn
without help.
Just pour gas on it after it smolders
Post by Florida
When you live in the country you don't have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.
Sure do. A fella made the news a couple of years ago by taking the
dogs back to
Back to????
Post by Florida
The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first
few weeks.
Ditto the neighbors' <expletive> dogs. (All neighbors have dogs,
city, town, and country.)
Need a good Korean or Pakistani restaurant close
Post by Florida
When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it's time to see a doctor.
Fix-in-to is one word.
There ain't no such thing as "lunch". There is only breakfast, dinner
and then there's supper.
"Sweetened ice tea" is appropriate for all meals, and you start
drinking it when you are two. You also give it to babies for colic..
Just a tid-bit.
Sure do. And displaced yanquis like us can tell the difference
between caffeinated kids and non-caffeinated, having seen both types.
"Backwards and forwards" means I know everything about you.
"Jeet?" is actually a phrase meaning, "Did you eat?"
You don't have to wear a watch because it doesn't matter what time it
is. You work until you're done, or it's too dark to see.
You measure distance in minutes or hours.
You can switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day.
Stores don't have bags. They have sacks.
You see cars with the engine running in the Wal-mart parking lot with
no one in them, no matter what time of the year.
All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.
You install security lights on your house and garage, and leave both
unlocked.
You carry jumper cables for your own car.
You know what "cow tipping" and "snipe hunting" are.
You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and
Tabasco.
Almost. We have Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and Texas Pete, made in
Winston-Salem.
You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.
The local papers cover national and international news on one page,
but require six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
The first day of deer season is a state holiday.
You find 100 degrees a "tad" warm.
The four seasons are: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.
You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.
Going to Wal-mart is a favorite past-time known as "goin Wal-Martin"
or "off to Wally-world".
You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.
A carbonated soft drink isn't a soda, cola, or pop....It's a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.
Around here, any c.s.d. is a "co-cola", at least to the old timers.
Texans understand these jokes. If you do too, forward them to your
friends from Texas. If you don't just come and stay awhile.
Like to, but y'all are going to have to do something about those
spiders first...
Do they really keep you out???
William Boyd
2006-08-31 21:04:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
We live in rural NC and identify with just a few items on your list,
what with us being so far north and all. Plus the Old Dude usually
points out that Tejas is the size of France so of course it will have a
distinctive national character.
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the air.
Sure, they're easy to catch, but do they really taste good?
Of course - taste like chicken.
NO! NO!, That is the snakes that taste like chicken, the dillos taste
like Possom (Possum) just not as greasy.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.
That must make for some very complicated, very big warning posters
in the schools.
Naaaa, only poster needed is regular snake round-up or rodeo.
Yeah! scares the shit outa the girls.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a
few no one has ever seen before.
What is it all those spiders are eating? Around here we have more
than enough bugs to satisfy all our spider types.
North Carolinians
And damed Yankees.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
Raccoons will test your melon crop, and let you know when they are ripe.
If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!
These two sound like the warnings given to visitors to Australia.
Send tenderfeet to Australia.
Post by Florida
Nothing will kill a mesquite tree.
So I guess that means you've already tried kidzu.
How do you cook it?
Do you mean how do you cook with it (Mesquite) and how do you cook it
kidzu, I think should be Kudzu. http://www.jjanthony.com/kudzu/ I never
ate up all the Turnip and Mustard greens yet, let alone trying Kudzu.
Cows like it though.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.
Omigawd! WHAT reasons? Whatever happened to a friendly shotgun
blast into the driveway dirt in front of the visitor's vehickle?
Darn good reasons
Varmints, BIG ass varmints.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
People actually grow and eat okra.
Well, of course we do. Deepfried okry is a basic food.
Maybe you have some promise after all
Have you tried it boiled, it is good, but some people associate it with
a big blob of snot.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
Green grass DOES burn.
Not in the wetter parts of NC. Sometimes cut wood won't burn
without help.
Just pour gas on it after it smolders
Post by Florida
When you live in the country you don't have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.
Sure do. A fella made the news a couple of years ago by taking the
dogs back to
Back to????
Post by Florida
The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first
few weeks.
Ditto the neighbors' <expletive> dogs. (All neighbors have dogs,
city, town, and country.)
Need a good Korean or Pakistani restaurant close
Ahh! nothing like a good dish of Road Kill. Always a surprise on the
plate when they bring it out.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it's time to see a doctor.
Fix-in-to is one word.
There ain't no such thing as "lunch". There is only breakfast, dinner
and then there's supper.
"Sweetened ice tea" is appropriate for all meals, and you start
drinking it when you are two. You also give it to babies for colic..
Just a tid-bit.
Sure do. And displaced yanquis like us can tell the difference
between caffeinated kids and non-caffeinated, having seen both types.
"Backwards and forwards" means I know everything about you.
"Jeet?" is actually a phrase meaning, "Did you eat?"
You don't have to wear a watch because it doesn't matter what time it
is. You work until you're done, or it's too dark to see.
You measure distance in minutes or hours.
You can switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day.
Stores don't have bags. They have sacks.
You see cars with the engine running in the Wal-mart parking lot with
no one in them, no matter what time of the year.
All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.
You install security lights on your house and garage, and leave both
unlocked.
You carry jumper cables for your own car.
You know what "cow tipping" and "snipe hunting" are.
You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and
Tabasco.
Almost. We have Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and Texas Pete, made in
Winston-Salem.
At least it is not made in New York City. But I prefer to use Pace
products, made in Paris, ........TEXAS
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.
The local papers cover national and international news on one page,
but require six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
The first day of deer season is a state holiday.
You find 100 degrees a "tad" warm.
The four seasons are: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.
You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.
Going to Wal-mart is a favorite past-time known as "goin Wal-Martin"
or "off to Wally-world".
You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.
A carbonated soft drink isn't a soda, cola, or pop....It's a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.
Around here, any c.s.d. is a "co-cola", at least to the old timers.
The younger old timers might call it Coke, but us real old farts call it
Sodie Pop.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
Texans understand these jokes. If you do too, forward them to your
friends from Texas. If you don't just come and stay awhile.
Like to, but y'all are going to have to do something about those
spiders first...
Do they really keep you out???
Only in their mind, I have learned how to broad jump in ten different
directions.
--
BILL P.
jimstevens
2006-08-31 22:24:18 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 16:04:42 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
We live in rural NC and identify with just a few items on your list,
what with us being so far north and all. Plus the Old Dude usually
points out that Tejas is the size of France so of course it will have a
distinctive national character.
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the air.
Sure, they're easy to catch, but do they really taste good?
Of course - taste like chicken.
NO! NO!, That is the snakes that taste like chicken, the dillos taste
like Possom (Possum) just not as greasy.
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.

never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.
That must make for some very complicated, very big warning posters
in the schools.
Naaaa, only poster needed is regular snake round-up or rodeo.
Yeah! scares the shit outa the girls.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a
few no one has ever seen before.
What is it all those spiders are eating? Around here we have more
than enough bugs to satisfy all our spider types.
North Carolinians
And damed Yankees.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
Raccoons will test your melon crop, and let you know when they are ripe.
If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!
These two sound like the warnings given to visitors to Australia.
Send tenderfeet to Australia.
Post by Florida
Nothing will kill a mesquite tree.
So I guess that means you've already tried kidzu.
How do you cook it?
Do you mean how do you cook with it (Mesquite) and how do you cook it
kidzu, I think should be Kudzu. http://www.jjanthony.com/kudzu/ I never
ate up all the Turnip and Mustard greens yet, let alone trying Kudzu.
Cows like it though.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.
Omigawd! WHAT reasons? Whatever happened to a friendly shotgun
blast into the driveway dirt in front of the visitor's vehickle?
Darn good reasons
Varmints, BIG ass varmints.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
People actually grow and eat okra.
Well, of course we do. Deepfried okry is a basic food.
Maybe you have some promise after all
Have you tried it boiled, it is good, but some people associate it with
a big blob of snot.
Of couse - cook in gumbo!
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
Green grass DOES burn.
Not in the wetter parts of NC. Sometimes cut wood won't burn
without help.
Just pour gas on it after it smolders
Post by Florida
When you live in the country you don't have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.
Sure do. A fella made the news a couple of years ago by taking the
dogs back to
Back to????
Post by Florida
The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first
few weeks.
Ditto the neighbors' <expletive> dogs. (All neighbors have dogs,
city, town, and country.)
Need a good Korean or Pakistani restaurant close
Ahh! nothing like a good dish of Road Kill. Always a surprise on the
plate when they bring it out.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it's time to see a doctor.
Fix-in-to is one word.
There ain't no such thing as "lunch". There is only breakfast, dinner
and then there's supper.
"Sweetened ice tea" is appropriate for all meals, and you start
drinking it when you are two. You also give it to babies for colic..
Just a tid-bit.
Sure do. And displaced yanquis like us can tell the difference
between caffeinated kids and non-caffeinated, having seen both types.
"Backwards and forwards" means I know everything about you.
"Jeet?" is actually a phrase meaning, "Did you eat?"
You don't have to wear a watch because it doesn't matter what time it
is. You work until you're done, or it's too dark to see.
You measure distance in minutes or hours.
You can switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day.
Stores don't have bags. They have sacks.
You see cars with the engine running in the Wal-mart parking lot with
no one in them, no matter what time of the year.
All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.
You install security lights on your house and garage, and leave both
unlocked.
You carry jumper cables for your own car.
You know what "cow tipping" and "snipe hunting" are.
You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and
Tabasco.
Almost. We have Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, and Texas Pete, made in
Winston-Salem.
At least it is not made in New York City. But I prefer to use Pace
products, made in Paris, ........TEXAS
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.
The local papers cover national and international news on one page,
but require six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
The first day of deer season is a state holiday.
You find 100 degrees a "tad" warm.
The four seasons are: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.
You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.
Going to Wal-mart is a favorite past-time known as "goin Wal-Martin"
or "off to Wally-world".
You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good
chili-eatin' weather.
A carbonated soft drink isn't a soda, cola, or pop....It's a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.
Around here, any c.s.d. is a "co-cola", at least to the old timers.
The younger old timers might call it Coke, but us real old farts call it
Sodie Pop.
Post by jimstevens
Post by Florida
Texans understand these jokes. If you do too, forward them to your
friends from Texas. If you don't just come and stay awhile.
Like to, but y'all are going to have to do something about those
spiders first...
Do they really keep you out???
Only in their mind, I have learned how to broad jump in ten different
directions.
William Boyd
2006-09-01 00:23:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Post by jimstevens
never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Don't tell some of the heavily Mississippi populated folks around here
that, they call it sole or is it soul food.


But let me tell you the truth, if it wasn't for Black birds, Jack
Rabbits and Cotton tails out in west Texas where I was a kid,
I wouldn't be here. My mother was a crack shot with a 22. We were so
poor that when my grandmother took the shotgun out to shoot blackbirds,
she would wait until several were lined up so as to get two or three
with one shot. We raised our own chicken feed and she would trade eggs
for ammunition. We would have fried chicken one time a year, Christmas.

BILL P.
jimstevens
2006-09-01 04:48:42 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Post by jimstevens
never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Don't tell some of the heavily Mississippi populated folks around here
that, they call it sole or is it soul food.
But let me tell you the truth, if it wasn't for Black birds
I shot them with a 410 as a kid when they were in flocks. Let them
land and then creep up close, begin to rise up so they rise up and
bam. Could get 8 or so in a shot and it took a bunch to make a mess
of em.

, Jack
Post by William Boyd
Rabbits
Did not have them in Lousiana but wished they did. They are bigger
then Cotton Tails.

and Cotton tails

Night time with carbide lite. They were the pink eyes. Shot lots of
them too.

And these were damn important part of our diet too!

out in west Texas where I was a kid,
Post by William Boyd
I wouldn't be here. My mother was a crack shot with a 22. We were so
poor that when my grandmother took the shotgun out to shoot blackbirds,
she would wait until several were lined up so as to get two or three
with one shot. We raised our own chicken feed and she would trade eggs
for ammunition. We would have fried chicken one time a year, Christmas.
BILL P.
We always had chickens and would let some set and raise the chicks.
Easy to raise chickens.

Other thing that was important was milk and pork. We almost always
had a milk cow. Skimming milk, making butter, cottage cheese, etc.
Couple pigs to eat anything we had including the whey from cottage
cheese and whatever else.

We would go to rail tracks where they transferred corn and would fill
up back of buckets and sometimes hundred pound feed sacks if we were
lucky.

Used old freezers that were laid on side to store feed. Corn was
great for feeding anything and can still remember smell of two day old
corn mash. We had four buckets and would slop hogs with the ripest
and dump in couple scoops of corn and add water. Other scraps and
such also went in.

Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.

Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.

Yeah, that is how we lived and I suspect most of us that came up that
way would have starved without it.

Great way to grow up! Damn motivated to work like hell so not to go
without again.
William Boyd
2006-09-01 05:51:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Post by jimstevens
never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Don't tell some of the heavily Mississippi populated folks around here
that, they call it sole or is it soul food.
But let me tell you the truth, if it wasn't for Black birds
I shot them with a 410 as a kid when they were in flocks. Let them
land and then creep up close, begin to rise up so they rise up and
bam. Could get 8 or so in a shot and it took a bunch to make a mess
of em.
, Jack
Post by William Boyd
Rabbits
Did not have them in Lousiana but wished they did. They are bigger
then Cotton Tails.
and Cotton tails
Night time with carbide lite. They were the pink eyes. Shot lots of
them too.
And these were damn important part of our diet too!
out in west Texas where I was a kid,
Post by William Boyd
I wouldn't be here. My mother was a crack shot with a 22. We were so
poor that when my grandmother took the shotgun out to shoot blackbirds,
she would wait until several were lined up so as to get two or three
with one shot. We raised our own chicken feed and she would trade eggs
for ammunition. We would have fried chicken one time a year, Christmas.
BILL P.
We always had chickens and would let some set and raise the chicks.
Easy to raise chickens.
Other thing that was important was milk and pork. We almost always
had a milk cow. Skimming milk, making butter, cottage cheese, etc.
Couple pigs to eat anything we had including the whey from cottage
cheese and whatever else.
We would go to rail tracks where they transferred corn and would fill
up back of buckets and sometimes hundred pound feed sacks if we were
lucky.
Used old freezers that were laid on side to store feed. Corn was
great for feeding anything and can still remember smell of two day old
corn mash. We had four buckets and would slop hogs with the ripest
and dump in couple scoops of corn and add water. Other scraps and
such also went in.
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
Yeah, that is how we lived and I suspect most of us that came up that
way would have starved without it.
Great way to grow up! Damn motivated to work like hell so not to go
without again.
You got that shit right. But the thing you said was cottage cheese was
milk clabber, cottage cheese did not exist back then. But you see we had
it a little rougher out in west Texas, cotton was just waist high to a
seven year old and we picked it all day for almost nothing. That was my
worst problem, we were so poor I failed two grades both of them the
first because we could not pay attention.
--
BILL P.
Just
Me
&
DOG
jimstevens
2006-09-01 13:53:58 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 00:51:45 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Post by jimstevens
never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Don't tell some of the heavily Mississippi populated folks around here
that, they call it sole or is it soul food.
But let me tell you the truth, if it wasn't for Black birds
I shot them with a 410 as a kid when they were in flocks. Let them
land and then creep up close, begin to rise up so they rise up and
bam. Could get 8 or so in a shot and it took a bunch to make a mess
of em.
, Jack
Post by William Boyd
Rabbits
Did not have them in Lousiana but wished they did. They are bigger
then Cotton Tails.
and Cotton tails
Night time with carbide lite. They were the pink eyes. Shot lots of
them too.
And these were damn important part of our diet too!
out in west Texas where I was a kid,
Post by William Boyd
I wouldn't be here. My mother was a crack shot with a 22. We were so
poor that when my grandmother took the shotgun out to shoot blackbirds,
she would wait until several were lined up so as to get two or three
with one shot. We raised our own chicken feed and she would trade eggs
for ammunition. We would have fried chicken one time a year, Christmas.
BILL P.
We always had chickens and would let some set and raise the chicks.
Easy to raise chickens.
Other thing that was important was milk and pork. We almost always
had a milk cow. Skimming milk, making butter, cottage cheese, etc.
Couple pigs to eat anything we had including the whey from cottage
cheese and whatever else.
We would go to rail tracks where they transferred corn and would fill
up back of buckets and sometimes hundred pound feed sacks if we were
lucky.
Used old freezers that were laid on side to store feed. Corn was
great for feeding anything and can still remember smell of two day old
corn mash. We had four buckets and would slop hogs with the ripest
and dump in couple scoops of corn and add water. Other scraps and
such also went in.
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
Yeah, that is how we lived and I suspect most of us that came up that
way would have starved without it.
Great way to grow up! Damn motivated to work like hell so not to go
without again.
You got that shit right. But the thing you said was cottage cheese was
milk clabber, cottage cheese did not exist back then. But you see we had
it a little rougher out in west Texas, cotton was just waist high to a
seven year old and we picked it all day for almost nothing. That was my
worst problem, we were so poor I failed two grades both of them the
first because we could not pay attention.
I have been picking my brain to remember what we made with skim milk.
I recall using buttermilk and fresh milk but can't for life of me
recall where it went from there. Cheese was thick and had a liquid
residue we strained off for pigs. Tasted horrible. Seems it was
thicker then clabber though and I loved putting some of our canned
pears or peaches into it. How to hell did we make it. I remember
making butter but we did not make make cheese often so now I can't
remember.
William Boyd
2006-09-02 04:34:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 00:51:45 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Post by jimstevens
never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Don't tell some of the heavily Mississippi populated folks around here
that, they call it sole or is it soul food.
But let me tell you the truth, if it wasn't for Black birds
I shot them with a 410 as a kid when they were in flocks. Let them
land and then creep up close, begin to rise up so they rise up and
bam. Could get 8 or so in a shot and it took a bunch to make a mess
of em.
, Jack
Post by William Boyd
Rabbits
Did not have them in Lousiana but wished they did. They are bigger
then Cotton Tails.
and Cotton tails
Night time with carbide lite. They were the pink eyes. Shot lots of
them too.
And these were damn important part of our diet too!
out in west Texas where I was a kid,
Post by William Boyd
I wouldn't be here. My mother was a crack shot with a 22. We were so
poor that when my grandmother took the shotgun out to shoot blackbirds,
she would wait until several were lined up so as to get two or three
with one shot. We raised our own chicken feed and she would trade eggs
for ammunition. We would have fried chicken one time a year, Christmas.
BILL P.
We always had chickens and would let some set and raise the chicks.
Easy to raise chickens.
Other thing that was important was milk and pork. We almost always
had a milk cow. Skimming milk, making butter, cottage cheese, etc.
Couple pigs to eat anything we had including the whey from cottage
cheese and whatever else.
We would go to rail tracks where they transferred corn and would fill
up back of buckets and sometimes hundred pound feed sacks if we were
lucky.
Used old freezers that were laid on side to store feed. Corn was
great for feeding anything and can still remember smell of two day old
corn mash. We had four buckets and would slop hogs with the ripest
and dump in couple scoops of corn and add water. Other scraps and
such also went in.
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
Yeah, that is how we lived and I suspect most of us that came up that
way would have starved without it.
Great way to grow up! Damn motivated to work like hell so not to go
without again.
You got that shit right. But the thing you said was cottage cheese was
milk clabber, cottage cheese did not exist back then. But you see we had
it a little rougher out in west Texas, cotton was just waist high to a
seven year old and we picked it all day for almost nothing. That was my
worst problem, we were so poor I failed two grades both of them the
first because we could not pay attention.
I have been picking my brain to remember what we made with skim milk.
I recall using buttermilk and fresh milk but can't for life of me
recall where it went from there. Cheese was thick and had a liquid
residue we strained off for pigs. Tasted horrible. Seems it was
thicker then clabber though and I loved putting some of our canned
pears or peaches into it. How to hell did we make it. I remember
making butter but we did not make make cheese often so now I can't
remember.
As I remember there was something that they had to add to the milk for
making cheese.
We had the butter milk which was actually more like clabber and they put
it in a churn and
stuck one of us kids on the handle to churn it up and down until your
arms was about to fall off.
Then you let it set and watch the butter flakes start to float up, scoop
it out as it came up.
Mid way through the churning you could stop and gather some butter, then
the remainder was
butter milk.

BILL P.
jimstevens
2006-09-02 23:14:19 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 23:34:28 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 00:51:45 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Post by jimstevens
never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Don't tell some of the heavily Mississippi populated folks around here
that, they call it sole or is it soul food.
But let me tell you the truth, if it wasn't for Black birds
I shot them with a 410 as a kid when they were in flocks. Let them
land and then creep up close, begin to rise up so they rise up and
bam. Could get 8 or so in a shot and it took a bunch to make a mess
of em.
, Jack
Post by William Boyd
Rabbits
Did not have them in Lousiana but wished they did. They are bigger
then Cotton Tails.
and Cotton tails
Night time with carbide lite. They were the pink eyes. Shot lots of
them too.
And these were damn important part of our diet too!
out in west Texas where I was a kid,
Post by William Boyd
I wouldn't be here. My mother was a crack shot with a 22. We were so
poor that when my grandmother took the shotgun out to shoot blackbirds,
she would wait until several were lined up so as to get two or three
with one shot. We raised our own chicken feed and she would trade eggs
for ammunition. We would have fried chicken one time a year, Christmas.
BILL P.
We always had chickens and would let some set and raise the chicks.
Easy to raise chickens.
Other thing that was important was milk and pork. We almost always
had a milk cow. Skimming milk, making butter, cottage cheese, etc.
Couple pigs to eat anything we had including the whey from cottage
cheese and whatever else.
We would go to rail tracks where they transferred corn and would fill
up back of buckets and sometimes hundred pound feed sacks if we were
lucky.
Used old freezers that were laid on side to store feed. Corn was
great for feeding anything and can still remember smell of two day old
corn mash. We had four buckets and would slop hogs with the ripest
and dump in couple scoops of corn and add water. Other scraps and
such also went in.
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
Yeah, that is how we lived and I suspect most of us that came up that
way would have starved without it.
Great way to grow up! Damn motivated to work like hell so not to go
without again.
You got that shit right. But the thing you said was cottage cheese was
milk clabber, cottage cheese did not exist back then. But you see we had
it a little rougher out in west Texas, cotton was just waist high to a
seven year old and we picked it all day for almost nothing. That was my
worst problem, we were so poor I failed two grades both of them the
first because we could not pay attention.
I have been picking my brain to remember what we made with skim milk.
I recall using buttermilk and fresh milk but can't for life of me
recall where it went from there. Cheese was thick and had a liquid
residue we strained off for pigs. Tasted horrible. Seems it was
thicker then clabber though and I loved putting some of our canned
pears or peaches into it. How to hell did we make it. I remember
making butter but we did not make make cheese often so now I can't
remember.
As I remember there was something that they had to add to the milk for
making cheese.
We had the butter milk which was actually more like clabber and they put
it in a churn and
stuck one of us kids on the handle to churn it up and down until your
arms was about to fall off.
You have it reversed. Let milk set in a bowl for a few hours and then
skim off the cream from the top and save it for several days. We
would add it right into a crockery churn that sat beside the fridge.
When you have about a gallon of the cream put into a churn and churn
away. Butter will form and you remove it. The milk remaining is
butter milk since the cream had not been in fridge.
Post by William Boyd
Then you let it set and watch the butter flakes start to float up, scoop
it out as it came up.
Mid way through the churning you could stop and gather some butter, then
the remainder was
butter milk.
BILL P.
Cheese was another process and I can't remember it.
William Boyd
2006-09-02 23:43:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 23:34:28 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 00:51:45 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Post by jimstevens
never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Don't tell some of the heavily Mississippi populated folks around here
that, they call it sole or is it soul food.
But let me tell you the truth, if it wasn't for Black birds
I shot them with a 410 as a kid when they were in flocks. Let them
land and then creep up close, begin to rise up so they rise up and
bam. Could get 8 or so in a shot and it took a bunch to make a mess
of em.
, Jack
Post by William Boyd
Rabbits
Did not have them in Lousiana but wished they did. They are bigger
then Cotton Tails.
and Cotton tails
Night time with carbide lite. They were the pink eyes. Shot lots of
them too.
And these were damn important part of our diet too!
out in west Texas where I was a kid,
Post by William Boyd
I wouldn't be here. My mother was a crack shot with a 22. We were so
poor that when my grandmother took the shotgun out to shoot blackbirds,
she would wait until several were lined up so as to get two or three
with one shot. We raised our own chicken feed and she would trade eggs
for ammunition. We would have fried chicken one time a year, Christmas.
BILL P.
We always had chickens and would let some set and raise the chicks.
Easy to raise chickens.
Other thing that was important was milk and pork. We almost always
had a milk cow. Skimming milk, making butter, cottage cheese, etc.
Couple pigs to eat anything we had including the whey from cottage
cheese and whatever else.
We would go to rail tracks where they transferred corn and would fill
up back of buckets and sometimes hundred pound feed sacks if we were
lucky.
Used old freezers that were laid on side to store feed. Corn was
great for feeding anything and can still remember smell of two day old
corn mash. We had four buckets and would slop hogs with the ripest
and dump in couple scoops of corn and add water. Other scraps and
such also went in.
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
Yeah, that is how we lived and I suspect most of us that came up that
way would have starved without it.
Great way to grow up! Damn motivated to work like hell so not to go
without again.
You got that shit right. But the thing you said was cottage cheese was
milk clabber, cottage cheese did not exist back then. But you see we had
it a little rougher out in west Texas, cotton was just waist high to a
seven year old and we picked it all day for almost nothing. That was my
worst problem, we were so poor I failed two grades both of them the
first because we could not pay attention.
I have been picking my brain to remember what we made with skim milk.
I recall using buttermilk and fresh milk but can't for life of me
recall where it went from there. Cheese was thick and had a liquid
residue we strained off for pigs. Tasted horrible. Seems it was
thicker then clabber though and I loved putting some of our canned
pears or peaches into it. How to hell did we make it. I remember
making butter but we did not make make cheese often so now I can't
remember.
As I remember there was something that they had to add to the milk for
making cheese.
We had the butter milk which was actually more like clabber and they put
it in a churn and
stuck one of us kids on the handle to churn it up and down until your
arms was about to fall off.
You have it reversed. Let milk set in a bowl for a few hours and then
skim off the cream from the top and save it for several days. We
would add it right into a crockery churn that sat beside the fridge.
When you have about a gallon of the cream put into a churn and churn
away. Butter will form and you remove it. The milk remaining is
butter milk since the cream had not been in fridge.
Post by William Boyd
Then you let it set and watch the butter flakes start to float up, scoop
it out as it came up.
Mid way through the churning you could stop and gather some butter, then
the remainder was
butter milk.
BILL P.
Cheese was another process and I can't remember it.
I think you are right, it has been a long time but you jarred my memory
some. I remember that they got a new machine that was called a separator
and it spun the milk at some point in the process to get the cream.

BILL P.
jimstevens
2006-09-03 14:11:05 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 02 Sep 2006 18:43:09 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 23:34:28 -0500, William Boyd
You have it reversed. Let milk set in a bowl for a few hours and then
skim off the cream from the top and save it for several days. We
would add it right into a crockery churn that sat beside the fridge.
When you have about a gallon of the cream put into a churn and churn
away. Butter will form and you remove it. The milk remaining is
butter milk since the cream had not been in fridge.
Post by William Boyd
Then you let it set and watch the butter flakes start to float up, scoop
it out as it came up.
Mid way through the churning you could stop and gather some butter, then
the remainder was
butter milk.
BILL P.
Cheese was another process and I can't remember it.
I think you are right, it has been a long time but you jarred my memory
some. I remember that they got a new machine that was called a separator
and it spun the milk at some point in the process to get the cream.
BILL P.
This is picture of the type churn we used most of the time.
http://www.museum.state.il.us/exhibits/athome/1850/objects/churn.htm
Pretty basic and seems the standard solution (in some form) for most.

We also had one of the glass jar types that I remember using. Here
are some

http://showcase.netins.net/web/churns/churnpicture.html
William Boyd
2006-09-05 05:16:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
On Sat, 02 Sep 2006 18:43:09 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 23:34:28 -0500, William Boyd
You have it reversed. Let milk set in a bowl for a few hours and then
skim off the cream from the top and save it for several days. We
would add it right into a crockery churn that sat beside the fridge.
When you have about a gallon of the cream put into a churn and churn
away. Butter will form and you remove it. The milk remaining is
butter milk since the cream had not been in fridge.
Post by William Boyd
Then you let it set and watch the butter flakes start to float up, scoop
it out as it came up.
Mid way through the churning you could stop and gather some butter, then
the remainder was
butter milk.
BILL P.
Cheese was another process and I can't remember it.
I think you are right, it has been a long time but you jarred my memory
some. I remember that they got a new machine that was called a separator
and it spun the milk at some point in the process to get the cream.
BILL P.
This is picture of the type churn we used most of the time.
http://www.museum.state.il.us/exhibits/athome/1850/objects/churn.htm
Pretty basic and seems the standard solution (in some form) for most.
We also had one of the glass jar types that I remember using. Here
are some
http://showcase.netins.net/web/churns/churnpicture.html
The churn in the crock looks exactly what we had, could have been a
little taller, but then I was a lot smaller so I really don't know. But
the color and all was exactly like that one. The other things, I never
seen before. But if you remember when you were young and raised in the
country, you did not place a lot of interest in things of labor. Like
the Corn Sheller
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=150029450806#ebayphotohosting
<http://www.qksrv.net/click-1707876-10381315?loc=http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll%3FViewItem%26item%3D260026693471&SID=generator>
ANTIQUE BLACKHAWK CORN SHELLER MAN'G CO-1886-ERIE IRON
<http://www.qksrv.net/click-1707876-10381315?loc=http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll%3FViewItem%26item%3D260026693471&SID=generator>



You think churning was hard, those small corn shellers would ware you
out in a hurry.

Another thing I can remember was running across the breezeway from the
bedroom side of a dogtrot style of farm house.
This little chore was done at daybreak to stoke the fires in the
fireplace and cook stove. If it was winter you were quite cold, course
if it was summer you did not have to do any thing for the fire place.
--
BILL P.
Just
Me
&
DOG
jimstevens
2006-09-05 15:06:05 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 00:16:20 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Sat, 02 Sep 2006 18:43:09 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 23:34:28 -0500, William Boyd
You have it reversed. Let milk set in a bowl for a few hours and then
skim off the cream from the top and save it for several days. We
would add it right into a crockery churn that sat beside the fridge.
When you have about a gallon of the cream put into a churn and churn
away. Butter will form and you remove it. The milk remaining is
butter milk since the cream had not been in fridge.
Post by William Boyd
Then you let it set and watch the butter flakes start to float up, scoop
it out as it came up.
Mid way through the churning you could stop and gather some butter, then
the remainder was
butter milk.
BILL P.
Cheese was another process and I can't remember it.
I think you are right, it has been a long time but you jarred my memory
some. I remember that they got a new machine that was called a separator
and it spun the milk at some point in the process to get the cream.
BILL P.
This is picture of the type churn we used most of the time.
http://www.museum.state.il.us/exhibits/athome/1850/objects/churn.htm
Pretty basic and seems the standard solution (in some form) for most.
We also had one of the glass jar types that I remember using. Here
are some
http://showcase.netins.net/web/churns/churnpicture.html
The churn in the crock looks exactly what we had, could have been a
little taller, but then I was a lot smaller so I really don't know. But
the color and all was exactly like that one. The other things, I never
seen before. But if you remember when you were young and raised in the
country, you did not place a lot of interest in things of labor. Like
the Corn Sheller
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=150029450806#ebayphotohosting
<http://www.qksrv.net/click-1707876-10381315?loc=http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll%3FViewItem%26item%3D260026693471&SID=generator>
ANTIQUE BLACKHAWK CORN SHELLER MAN'G CO-1886-ERIE IRON
<http://www.qksrv.net/click-1707876-10381315?loc=http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll%3FViewItem%26item%3D260026693471&SID=generator>
You think churning was hard, those small corn shellers would ware you
out in a hurry.
Another thing I can remember was running across the breezeway from the
bedroom side of a dogtrot style of farm house.
This little chore was done at daybreak to stoke the fires in the
fireplace and cook stove. If it was winter you were quite cold, course
if it was summer you did not have to do any thing for the fire place.
Never saw one of those shellers. The cold I remember was milking on
cold mornings. Sitting on the stool milking with my head turned so an
ear was pressed up against cow's belly then switching ears when I
switched to the other two tits. Damn it was cold. Started earlier
with warming some water on stove for the milk bucket, hurry out to
barn and make sure water was j u s t right. If it was not warm that
cow would kick the hell out of you. They just did not like cold water
splashed on them on a cold morning. They would stay angry and
sometimes step into the bucket. All the germs and such of the day and
we were all fine for it eh?

Kids today are pansies.

E (Bet) Anthony
2006-09-04 04:59:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 23:34:28 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 00:51:45 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk for a bit,
rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside and out. Sprinkle heavy
black pepper, sweet basil and thyme both inside and out, throw into
dilo body a couple peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves
(crushed). Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos wrapped in
foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Post by jimstevens
never never never eat possum. they are four footed turkey vultures in
their diet and would never touch em.
Don't tell some of the heavily Mississippi populated folks around here
that, they call it sole or is it soul food.
But let me tell you the truth, if it wasn't for Black birds
I shot them with a 410 as a kid when they were in flocks. Let them
land and then creep up close, begin to rise up so they rise up and
bam. Could get 8 or so in a shot and it took a bunch to make a mess
of em.
, Jack
Post by William Boyd
Rabbits
Did not have them in Lousiana but wished they did. They are bigger
then Cotton Tails.
and Cotton tails
Night time with carbide lite. They were the pink eyes. Shot lots of
them too.
And these were damn important part of our diet too!
out in west Texas where I was a kid,
Post by William Boyd
I wouldn't be here. My mother was a crack shot with a 22. We were so
poor that when my grandmother took the shotgun out to shoot blackbirds,
she would wait until several were lined up so as to get two or three
with one shot. We raised our own chicken feed and she would trade eggs
for ammunition. We would have fried chicken one time a year, Christmas.
BILL P.
We always had chickens and would let some set and raise the chicks.
Easy to raise chickens.
Other thing that was important was milk and pork. We almost always
had a milk cow. Skimming milk, making butter, cottage cheese, etc.
Couple pigs to eat anything we had including the whey from cottage
cheese and whatever else.
We would go to rail tracks where they transferred corn and would fill
up back of buckets and sometimes hundred pound feed sacks if we were
lucky.
Used old freezers that were laid on side to store feed. Corn was
great for feeding anything and can still remember smell of two day old
corn mash. We had four buckets and would slop hogs with the ripest
and dump in couple scoops of corn and add water. Other scraps and
such also went in.
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
Yeah, that is how we lived and I suspect most of us that came up that
way would have starved without it.
Great way to grow up! Damn motivated to work like hell so not to go
without again.
You got that shit right. But the thing you said was cottage cheese was
milk clabber, cottage cheese did not exist back then. But you see we had
it a little rougher out in west Texas, cotton was just waist high to a
seven year old and we picked it all day for almost nothing. That was my
worst problem, we were so poor I failed two grades both of them the
first because we could not pay attention.
I have been picking my brain to remember what we made with skim milk.
I recall using buttermilk and fresh milk but can't for life of me
recall where it went from there. Cheese was thick and had a liquid
residue we strained off for pigs. Tasted horrible. Seems it was
thicker then clabber though and I loved putting some of our canned
pears or peaches into it. How to hell did we make it. I remember
making butter but we did not make make cheese often so now I can't
remember.
As I remember there was something that they had to add to the milk for
making cheese.
We had the butter milk which was actually more like clabber and they put
it in a churn and
stuck one of us kids on the handle to churn it up and down until your
arms was about to fall off.
You have it reversed. Let milk set in a bowl for a few hours and then
skim off the cream from the top and save it for several days. We
would add it right into a crockery churn that sat beside the fridge.
When you have about a gallon of the cream put into a churn and churn
away. Butter will form and you remove it. The milk remaining is
butter milk since the cream had not been in fridge.
Post by William Boyd
Then you let it set and watch the butter flakes start to float up, scoop
it out as it came up.
Mid way through the churning you could stop and gather some butter, then
the remainder was
butter milk.
BILL P.
Cheese was another process and I can't remember it.
We didn't have electricity on the farm. So if we didn't drink the
buttermilk it soon turned into curds and whey or clabber milk. Strain
off the whey for cottage cheese.

<G>
Earl
2006-09-01 06:59:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk
for a bit, rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside
and out. Sprinkle heavy black pepper, sweet basil and
thyme both inside and out, throw into dilo body a couple
peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves (crushed).
Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos
wrapped in foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Sort of definite you do not know much about 'dillos.

Suveys show that about 25% of armadillos are carriers for
Hansen's disease.

If you want Leprosy go right ahead.

They do have cures nowdays so you would not be put in lifetime
quarantine in Louisiana or Hawaii by the Public Health Service
any more. But the treatment would be an inconvenience. (but at
your age it is not as dangerous, takes 20 years for the symptoms
to really show up - just like tertiary syphlis)
William Boyd
2006-09-01 13:44:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk
for a bit, rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside
and out. Sprinkle heavy black pepper, sweet basil and
thyme both inside and out, throw into dilo body a couple
peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves (crushed).
Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos
wrapped in foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Sort of definite you do not know much about 'dillos.
Suveys show that about 25% of armadillos are carriers for
Hansen's disease.
If you want Leprosy go right ahead.
They do have cures nowdays so you would not be put in lifetime
quarantine in Louisiana or Hawaii by the Public Health Service
any more. But the treatment would be an inconvenience. (but at
your age it is not as dangerous, takes 20 years for the symptoms
to really show up - just like tertiary syphlis)
Now you know any one with the name of EARL, can't know nuttin bout
dillos. ;-)
--
BILL P.
Just
Me
&
DOG
AndyS
2006-09-01 14:39:54 UTC
Permalink
Andy writes;
You guys make my stories about living on ketchup soup
and mayonaisse sandwiches sound like I was a Rockefeller
or something......

........ and my kids think I am making my childhood up.........


Andy in Eureka, Texas
William Boyd
2006-09-02 05:54:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by AndyS
Andy writes;
You guys make my stories about living on ketchup soup
and mayonaisse sandwiches sound like I was a Rockefeller
or something......
........ and my kids think I am making my childhood up.........
Andy in Eureka, Texas
Shoot, you heard about having to walk to school. It was two miles to our
school in west Texas.
They knew nothing about school buses. Course things were so tight out
there school age was seven.
That coincided to the same age I got my first pair of shoes. In west
Texas sand burs was more plentiful
than grass. So you can imagine how difficult it was to run around the
yard.Oh yes, there was also no lawn in the yard because the chickens and
turkeys would eat every blade of grass. My grandmother would actually
sweep the yard, the ground was so hard that it was like concrete. But
you can imagine what she was sweeping with chickens and turkeys running
around the place. Little gooey when you happen to step in one bare
footed. Another thing about going barefooted was you always had at least
one big toe bloodied from stumping them. Our nearest neighbor was about
a half mile away straight through the fields, across a creek and up a
little hill. Not to forget about the sand burs, I used to try walking
the whole way on stilts, home made of course. I had an older brother
that had already started to school, so that meant he had shoes. He
rescued me several times from the sand burs, the stilts was a little to
hard a chore for me, but I could make it quite a ways.
Of course we had our chores to do also. We lived close to the water
tank. That is what they were called, but they were just a pond of water
that was dammed up and used for livestock watering. We had to carry
water from the tank and fill up a large cistern located on the back
porch. The roof had makeshift gutters to catch the rain water and
deposit it in a large barrel. That is what grandmother would use to cook
with and wash her hair. Then we had to keep the wood pile and Kindling
box filled. most of the wood was Mesquite, even it had thorns. Brush up
against a prickly pair cactus and you would get again.
Our nearest big town was Brownwood, we might get to visit it one or two
times a year. I have been back to visit Brownwood lately and discovered
there was or is pecan trees all over the town. They are all around the
court house square, you can go around picking up as many pecans as you
want. I do not remember any thing about that town,
I don't even remember much about the small village that our school was
at. My recent visit revealed that there was maybe two businesses and a
school house that is currently a church. It was a one room school house
all grades went at the same time. Now I do remember a lot about the
cloak room. That is where you hung your coats, and had to stand when you
talked in class, yep a lot about that room. We had a well outside and an
out house, best I remember it was a one holer, like the one at home. Now
there is a cold place in the winter and a stinking place in the summer.
Sears Roebuck catalogs was not printed on slick paper back in those
days. Course there was a basket of corn cobs over in the corner, for
when you ran out of pages in the catalog. The catalog was something to
read while you were in there doing your business.

BILL P.
E (Bet) Anthony
2006-09-04 04:59:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Boyd
Post by AndyS
Andy writes;
You guys make my stories about living on ketchup soup
and mayonaisse sandwiches sound like I was a Rockefeller
or something......
........ and my kids think I am making my childhood up.........
Andy in Eureka, Texas
Shoot, you heard about having to walk to school. It was two miles to
our school in west Texas.
They knew nothing about school buses. Course things were so tight out
there school age was seven.
That coincided to the same age I got my first pair of shoes. In west
Texas sand burs was more plentiful
than grass. So you can imagine how difficult it was to run around the
yard.Oh yes, there was also no lawn in the yard because the chickens
and turkeys would eat every blade of grass. My grandmother would
actually sweep the yard, the ground was so hard that it was like
concrete. But you can imagine what she was sweeping with chickens and
turkeys running around the place. Little gooey when you happen to step
in one bare footed. Another thing about going barefooted was you
always had at least one big toe bloodied from stumping them. Our
nearest neighbor was about a half mile away straight through the
fields, across a creek and up a little hill. Not to forget about the
sand burs, I used to try walking the whole way on stilts, home made of
course. I had an older brother that had already started to school, so
that meant he had shoes. He rescued me several times from the sand
burs, the stilts was a little to hard a chore for me, but I could make
it quite a ways.
Of course we had our chores to do also. We lived close to the water
tank. That is what they were called, but they were just a pond of
water that was dammed up and used for livestock watering. We had to
carry water from the tank and fill up a large cistern located on the
back porch. The roof had makeshift gutters to catch the rain water and
deposit it in a large barrel. That is what grandmother would use to
cook with and wash her hair. Then we had to keep the wood pile and
Kindling box filled. most of the wood was Mesquite, even it had
thorns. Brush up against a prickly pair cactus and you would get again.
Our nearest big town was Brownwood, we might get to visit it one or
two times a year. I have been back to visit Brownwood lately and
discovered there was or is pecan trees all over the town. They are all
around the court house square, you can go around picking up as many
pecans as you want. I do not remember any thing about that town,
I don't even remember much about the small village that our school was
at. My recent visit revealed that there was maybe two businesses and a
school house that is currently a church. It was a one room school
house all grades went at the same time. Now I do remember a lot about
the cloak room. That is where you hung your coats, and had to stand
when you talked in class, yep a lot about that room. We had a well
outside and an out house, best I remember it was a one holer, like the
one at home. Now there is a cold place in the winter and a stinking
place in the summer. Sears Roebuck catalogs was not printed on slick
paper back in those days. Course there was a basket of corn cobs over
in the corner, for when you ran out of pages in the catalog. The
catalog was something to read while you were in there doing your
business.
BILL P.
You've brought back a lot of old memories about growing up in the country.

<G>
William Boyd
2006-09-04 17:16:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by E (Bet) Anthony
Post by William Boyd
Post by AndyS
Andy writes;
You guys make my stories about living on ketchup soup
and mayonaisse sandwiches sound like I was a Rockefeller
or something......
........ and my kids think I am making my childhood up.........
Andy in Eureka, Texas
Shoot, you heard about having to walk to school. It was two miles to
our school in west Texas.
They knew nothing about school buses. Course things were so tight out
there school age was seven.
That coincided to the same age I got my first pair of shoes. In west
Texas sand burs was more plentiful
than grass. So you can imagine how difficult it was to run around the
yard.Oh yes, there was also no lawn in the yard because the chickens
and turkeys would eat every blade of grass. My grandmother would
actually sweep the yard, the ground was so hard that it was like
concrete. But you can imagine what she was sweeping with chickens and
turkeys running around the place. Little gooey when you happen to
step in one bare footed. Another thing about going barefooted was you
always had at least one big toe bloodied from stumping them. Our
nearest neighbor was about a half mile away straight through the
fields, across a creek and up a little hill. Not to forget about the
sand burs, I used to try walking the whole way on stilts, home made
of course. I had an older brother that had already started to school,
so that meant he had shoes. He rescued me several times from the sand
burs, the stilts was a little to hard a chore for me, but I could
make it quite a ways.
Of course we had our chores to do also. We lived close to the water
tank. That is what they were called, but they were just a pond of
water that was dammed up and used for livestock watering. We had to
carry water from the tank and fill up a large cistern located on the
back porch. The roof had makeshift gutters to catch the rain water
and deposit it in a large barrel. That is what grandmother would use
to cook with and wash her hair. Then we had to keep the wood pile and
Kindling box filled. most of the wood was Mesquite, even it had
thorns. Brush up against a prickly pair cactus and you would get again.
Our nearest big town was Brownwood, we might get to visit it one or
two times a year. I have been back to visit Brownwood lately and
discovered there was or is pecan trees all over the town. They are
all around the court house square, you can go around picking up as
many pecans as you want. I do not remember any thing about that town,
I don't even remember much about the small village that our school
was at. My recent visit revealed that there was maybe two businesses
and a school house that is currently a church. It was a one room
school house all grades went at the same time. Now I do remember a
lot about the cloak room. That is where you hung your coats, and had
to stand when you talked in class, yep a lot about that room. We had
a well outside and an out house, best I remember it was a one holer,
like the one at home. Now there is a cold place in the winter and a
stinking place in the summer. Sears Roebuck catalogs was not printed
on slick paper back in those days. Course there was a basket of corn
cobs over in the corner, for when you ran out of pages in the
catalog. The catalog was something to read while you were in there
doing your business.
BILL P.
You've brought back a lot of old memories about growing up in the country.
<G>
Well the memories are sure nuf old, and might have just a little day
dreaming in them but as accurate
as I reminisce they were. Course we never remember the way it really was.

BILL P.
jimstevens
2006-09-04 18:50:44 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 12:16:09 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by E (Bet) Anthony
Post by William Boyd
Post by AndyS
Andy writes;
You guys make my stories about living on ketchup soup
and mayonaisse sandwiches sound like I was a Rockefeller
or something......
........ and my kids think I am making my childhood up.........
Andy in Eureka, Texas
Shoot, you heard about having to walk to school. It was two miles to
our school in west Texas.
They knew nothing about school buses. Course things were so tight out
there school age was seven.
That coincided to the same age I got my first pair of shoes. In west
Texas sand burs was more plentiful
than grass. So you can imagine how difficult it was to run around the
yard.Oh yes, there was also no lawn in the yard because the chickens
and turkeys would eat every blade of grass. My grandmother would
actually sweep the yard, the ground was so hard that it was like
concrete. But you can imagine what she was sweeping with chickens and
turkeys running around the place. Little gooey when you happen to
step in one bare footed. Another thing about going barefooted was you
always had at least one big toe bloodied from stumping them. Our
nearest neighbor was about a half mile away straight through the
fields, across a creek and up a little hill. Not to forget about the
sand burs, I used to try walking the whole way on stilts, home made
of course. I had an older brother that had already started to school,
so that meant he had shoes. He rescued me several times from the sand
burs, the stilts was a little to hard a chore for me, but I could
make it quite a ways.
Of course we had our chores to do also. We lived close to the water
tank. That is what they were called, but they were just a pond of
water that was dammed up and used for livestock watering. We had to
carry water from the tank and fill up a large cistern located on the
back porch. The roof had makeshift gutters to catch the rain water
and deposit it in a large barrel. That is what grandmother would use
to cook with and wash her hair. Then we had to keep the wood pile and
Kindling box filled. most of the wood was Mesquite, even it had
thorns. Brush up against a prickly pair cactus and you would get again.
Our nearest big town was Brownwood, we might get to visit it one or
two times a year. I have been back to visit Brownwood lately and
discovered there was or is pecan trees all over the town. They are
all around the court house square, you can go around picking up as
many pecans as you want. I do not remember any thing about that town,
I don't even remember much about the small village that our school
was at. My recent visit revealed that there was maybe two businesses
and a school house that is currently a church. It was a one room
school house all grades went at the same time. Now I do remember a
lot about the cloak room. That is where you hung your coats, and had
to stand when you talked in class, yep a lot about that room. We had
a well outside and an out house, best I remember it was a one holer,
like the one at home. Now there is a cold place in the winter and a
stinking place in the summer. Sears Roebuck catalogs was not printed
on slick paper back in those days. Course there was a basket of corn
cobs over in the corner, for when you ran out of pages in the
catalog. The catalog was something to read while you were in there
doing your business.
BILL P.
You've brought back a lot of old memories about growing up in the country.
<G>
Well the memories are sure nuf old, and might have just a little day
dreaming in them but as accurate
as I reminisce they were. Course we never remember the way it really was.
BILL P.
I remember that one thing that sustained me was dreaming of putting as
much air between me and poverty of that lifestyle. As romantic as it
may sound; such living is not "all of that"! It sucks to be tied to a
milking schedule every 12 hours! And that is just a peek of it.
AndyS
2006-09-04 18:56:28 UTC
Permalink
William Boyd wrote:>
Post by William Boyd
Well the memories are sure nuf old, and might have just a little day
dreaming in them but as accurate
as I reminisce they were. Course we never remember the way it really was.
BILL P.
Andy writes;
Heck, I remember having to walk to school and back 2 miles every day
in a foot
of snow. And it was uphill.... both ways ...

We were so poor we didn't have .22s to shoot with. I remember
having
to hunt squirrels using a stick with a nail in it.... And it was only a
short nail....

............... Shucks !!!!!!

Andy in Eureka, Texas
William Boyd
2006-09-04 21:37:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by AndyS
William Boyd wrote:>
Post by William Boyd
Well the memories are sure nuf old, and might have just a little day
dreaming in them but as accurate
as I reminisce they were. Course we never remember the way it really was.
BILL P.
Andy writes;
Heck, I remember having to walk to school and back 2 miles every day
in a foot
of snow. And it was uphill.... both ways ...
We were so poor we didn't have .22s to shoot with. I remember
having
to hunt squirrels using a stick with a nail in it.... And it was only a
short nail....
............... Shucks !!!!!!
Andy in Eureka, Texas
I didn't say we had .22s, that was our mother, we had sling shots made
from stripped innertubes, the red ones were the best. Go down to the
creek and sort through the gravel, gathering just the right size for
ammunition for the sling shot.

WB
jimstevens
2006-09-04 23:17:06 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 16:37:49 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by AndyS
William Boyd wrote:>
Post by William Boyd
Well the memories are sure nuf old, and might have just a little day
dreaming in them but as accurate
as I reminisce they were. Course we never remember the way it really was.
BILL P.
Andy writes;
Heck, I remember having to walk to school and back 2 miles every day
in a foot
of snow. And it was uphill.... both ways ...
We were so poor we didn't have .22s to shoot with. I remember
having
to hunt squirrels using a stick with a nail in it.... And it was only a
short nail....
............... Shucks !!!!!!
Andy in Eureka, Texas
I didn't say we had .22s, that was our mother, we had sling shots made
from stripped innertubes, the red ones were the best. Go down to the
creek and sort through the gravel, gathering just the right size for
ammunition for the sling shot.
WB
Hell, we just had to eat the gravel.
jimstevens
2006-09-03 04:11:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 19:23:36 -0500, William Boyd
Post by William Boyd
Post by jimstevens
you believed I was serious? Dillo is better soaked in milk
for a bit, rub tablespoon or so of olive oil both inside
and out. Sprinkle heavy black pepper, sweet basil and
thyme both inside and out, throw into dilo body a couple
peeled onions and dozen or so big garlic cloves (crushed).
Some would throw sweet potatos into body as well or place
around. I prefer not to cook with dillo. Bake potatos
wrapped in foil at same time.
If I can sell this recipe do you want some of the royalties.
Sort of definite you do not know much about 'dillos.
Suveys show that about 25% of armadillos are carriers for
Hansen's disease.
If you want Leprosy go right ahead.
They do have cures nowdays so you would not be put in lifetime
quarantine in Louisiana or Hawaii by the Public Health Service
any more. But the treatment would be an inconvenience. (but at
your age it is not as dangerous, takes 20 years for the symptoms
to really show up - just like tertiary syphlis)
Yeah and a walk in woods today is terrifying for ticks and Lime
disease. Bears have trichnosis and turtles are supposed to have
something as well. Every damn animal in the woods carries ticks and
probably some disease is out there on all of them.

We were too primitive to know about such but I can vividly recall once
catching an armadillo that ran into a hole with it's tail sticking
out. I pulled and it held on for a bit but I won and killed it with a
rap up against a tree. If it swam, flew, ran, or crawled it was under
consideration for the pot. I remember once eating gar balls (scrape
meat off bones and mix with chopped onion, bit of flour, salt, and
pepper. Problem was I boiled em too long and they could have been
used to play ball they were so rubbery. Ate em but never cooked em so
long after that.

Ever caught or ate bowfish?
Earl
2006-09-03 05:01:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
Ever caught or ate bowfish?
Not me!!

I detest seafood of all types.

I used to arrage to sit second seating in the wardroom up in
Maine because they were pigging out on lobster.

I just had a steak.
jimstevens
2006-09-03 14:11:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
Ever caught or ate bowfish?
Not me!!
I detest seafood of all types.
I used to arrage to sit second seating in the wardroom up in
Maine because they were pigging out on lobster.
I just had a steak.
Bowfin (not Bowfish - sorry) is one of the most powerful freshwater
fish I have every caught. You don't have to eat it to have fun
catching it.

Detest? Does that sound irrational?
Earl
2006-09-03 16:15:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
Ever caught or ate bowfish?
Not me!!
I detest seafood of all types.
I used to arrage to sit second seating in the wardroom up in
Maine because they were pigging out on lobster.
I just had a steak.
Bowfin (not Bowfish - sorry) is one of the most powerful
freshwater fish I have every caught. You don't have to eat
it to have fun catching it.
Detest? Does that sound irrational?
Of course it is irrational.

You do not think that a person that would go to sea in a sub was
perfectly sane and sensable do you. They are almost as crazy as
those idiots that jump out of perfectly good airplanes.
E (Bet) Anthony
2006-09-04 04:59:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
Ever caught or ate bowfish?
Not me!!
I detest seafood of all types.
I used to arrage to sit second seating in the wardroom up in
Maine because they were pigging out on lobster.
I just had a steak.
Bowfin (not Bowfish - sorry) is one of the most powerful
freshwater fish I have every caught. You don't have to eat
it to have fun catching it.
Detest? Does that sound irrational?
Of course it is irrational.
You do not think that a person that would go to sea in a sub was
perfectly sane and sensable do you. They are almost as crazy as
those idiots that jump out of perfectly good airplanes.
I've jumped out of a few 'perfectly good aircraft,' but never had the
urge to go to sea in a sub.

<G>
William Boyd
2006-09-04 17:20:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by E (Bet) Anthony
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
Ever caught or ate bowfish?
Not me!!
I detest seafood of all types.
I used to arrage to sit second seating in the wardroom up in
Maine because they were pigging out on lobster.
I just had a steak.
Bowfin (not Bowfish - sorry) is one of the most powerful
freshwater fish I have every caught. You don't have to eat
it to have fun catching it.
Detest? Does that sound irrational?
Of course it is irrational.
You do not think that a person that would go to sea in a sub was
perfectly sane and sensable do you. They are almost as crazy as those
idiots that jump out of perfectly good airplanes.
I've jumped out of a few 'perfectly good aircraft,' but never had the
urge to go to sea in a sub.
<G>
Oh! Yes! And had a hell of a long walk back afterwards.

WB
E (Bet) Anthony
2006-09-05 04:58:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Boyd
Post by E (Bet) Anthony
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
Post by Earl
Post by jimstevens
Ever caught or ate bowfish?
Not me!!
I detest seafood of all types.
I used to arrage to sit second seating in the wardroom up in
Maine because they were pigging out on lobster.
I just had a steak.
Bowfin (not Bowfish - sorry) is one of the most powerful
freshwater fish I have every caught. You don't have to eat
it to have fun catching it.
Detest? Does that sound irrational?
Of course it is irrational.
You do not think that a person that would go to sea in a sub was
perfectly sane and sensable do you. They are almost as crazy as
those idiots that jump out of perfectly good airplanes.
I've jumped out of a few 'perfectly good aircraft,' but never had the
urge to go to sea in a sub.
<G>
Oh! Yes! And had a hell of a long walk back afterwards.
WB
I have one entry in my logbook where the distance to target is 'a mile
or more'.
Florida
2006-09-02 02:16:50 UTC
Permalink
jimstevens wrote:
-snipped here but saved to a file-
Post by jimstevens
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Your whole post is great. I think a lot of people would want to
read a longer description of what it's like to live a *real*
back-to-the-land, voluntary simplicity life.
Pecans - We need advice on pecans. We have a GIGANTIC pecan tree in
the back yard, not sure but I think I've already described it in this
n.g. Anyway, it's so big that the actually that pecan tree is the
critter that lives on this 1/2 acre and we get to use the space that's
left over. This tree makes very large crops of nuts. The neighbors
tell us to expect to rake up nuts in order to walk on grass in the back
yard. My question is, can you give us some tips on how to handle the
nuts, gather them, etc? Any handy hints for shelling them?
We were gone last fall and winter, so we didn't see the 2005 crop
last fall when it was new. When I got home in April the ground was
still littered with a couple of bushels of nuts. Grandkids and I
carefully gathered a bushel or so and stored them in the garden shed to
dry out for a week or two, the way we used to do up home with black
walnuts... and an army of squirrels came to take them away and/or plant
them in our herb garden, veg garden, potted plants, flower borders and
foundation plantings.
Post by jimstevens
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
I grew up in a big industrial city, and the Old Dude on a dairy
farm. So he was appalled to learn the first summer we were married,
that what I really wanted to do was 1) go out to gather wild berries
and wild apples, 2) make jams and jellies, 3) have a veg garden, and 4)
plant roses & daylilies all arround the house we were renting.
Poor man, he had no idea that inside many a city slicker is someone
who wants to raise a garden - 3 tomato plants and a cucumber.
Harry Thompson
2006-09-02 14:39:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Florida
-snipped here but saved to a file-
Post by jimstevens
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Your whole post is great. I think a lot of people would want to
read a longer description of what it's like to live a *real*
back-to-the-land, voluntary simplicity life.
Pecans - We need advice on pecans. We have a GIGANTIC pecan tree in
the back yard, not sure but I think I've already described it in this
n.g. Anyway, it's so big that the actually that pecan tree is the
critter that lives on this 1/2 acre and we get to use the space that's
left over. This tree makes very large crops of nuts. The neighbors
tell us to expect to rake up nuts in order to walk on grass in the back
yard. My question is, can you give us some tips on how to handle the
nuts, gather them, etc? Any handy hints for shelling them?
We were gone last fall and winter, so we didn't see the 2005 crop
last fall when it was new. When I got home in April the ground was
still littered with a couple of bushels of nuts. Grandkids and I
carefully gathered a bushel or so and stored them in the garden shed to
dry out for a week or two, the way we used to do up home with black
walnuts... and an army of squirrels came to take them away and/or plant
them in our herb garden, veg garden, potted plants, flower borders and
foundation plantings.
Post by jimstevens
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
I grew up in a big industrial city, and the Old Dude on a dairy
farm. So he was appalled to learn the first summer we were married,
that what I really wanted to do was 1) go out to gather wild berries
and wild apples, 2) make jams and jellies, 3) have a veg garden, and 4)
plant roses & daylilies all arround the house we were renting.
Poor man, he had no idea that inside many a city slicker is someone
who wants to raise a garden - 3 tomato plants and a cucumber.
There are few things growing naturally in Texas that are good, and pecans is
one of them. They grow naturally in this hostile environment, and without
care. There are few things more delicious than a pecan. And the wood is a
great hardwood if you are into furniture making. A funny purple though.

I have a small pecan in my backyard that I planted myself 20 years ago. I
wait until the nuts fall by themselves to gather them. Unfortunately the
squirrels beat me to them. My wife and I debated what to do about the
squirrels. I objected to killing them because 1st I like small furry
creatures, and 2nd other squirrels would move in to replace them.

Then I thought of putting rat guards on the trees. But that would be quite a
job, and success would not be guaranteed.

Finally, I concluded the heck with it. Let the squirrels have the pecans. I
can always buy them in the store.

Hap :-)
William Boyd
2006-09-02 16:04:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry Thompson
Post by Florida
-snipped here but saved to a file-
Post by jimstevens
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Your whole post is great. I think a lot of people would want to
read a longer description of what it's like to live a *real*
back-to-the-land, voluntary simplicity life.
Pecans - We need advice on pecans. We have a GIGANTIC pecan tree in
the back yard, not sure but I think I've already described it in this
n.g. Anyway, it's so big that the actually that pecan tree is the
critter that lives on this 1/2 acre and we get to use the space that's
left over. This tree makes very large crops of nuts. The neighbors
tell us to expect to rake up nuts in order to walk on grass in the back
yard. My question is, can you give us some tips on how to handle the
nuts, gather them, etc? Any handy hints for shelling them?
We were gone last fall and winter, so we didn't see the 2005 crop
last fall when it was new. When I got home in April the ground was
still littered with a couple of bushels of nuts. Grandkids and I
carefully gathered a bushel or so and stored them in the garden shed to
dry out for a week or two, the way we used to do up home with black
walnuts... and an army of squirrels came to take them away and/or plant
them in our herb garden, veg garden, potted plants, flower borders and
foundation plantings.
Post by jimstevens
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
I grew up in a big industrial city, and the Old Dude on a dairy
farm. So he was appalled to learn the first summer we were married,
that what I really wanted to do was 1) go out to gather wild berries
and wild apples, 2) make jams and jellies, 3) have a veg garden, and 4)
plant roses & daylilies all arround the house we were renting.
Poor man, he had no idea that inside many a city slicker is someone
who wants to raise a garden - 3 tomato plants and a cucumber.
There are few things growing naturally in Texas that are good, and pecans is
one of them. They grow naturally in this hostile environment, and without
care. There are few things more delicious than a pecan. And the wood is a
great hardwood if you are into furniture making. A funny purple though.
I have a small pecan in my backyard that I planted myself 20 years ago. I
wait until the nuts fall by themselves to gather them. Unfortunately the
squirrels beat me to them. My wife and I debated what to do about the
squirrels. I objected to killing them because 1st I like small furry
creatures, and 2nd other squirrels would move in to replace them.
Then I thought of putting rat guards on the trees. But that would be quite a
job, and success would not be guaranteed.
Finally, I concluded the heck with it. Let the squirrels have the pecans. I
can always buy them in the store.
Hap :-)
That is true, the squirls do have a way with getting the nuts. The only
way around it is to shake the nuts out of the tree
and pick them up on your schedule rather than on natures and the squirls
schedule.

But there are other things like the fruit that is produced by the
cactus. They are good, at least my brother and I thought they were some
sixty five years or so ago. Then along the small water ways are things
like Persimmons, Mulberry and
Sassafras trees for Tea, cold drinks and jelly. There were wild plums
and blackberry bushes as well.

BILL P.--
AndyS
2006-09-02 17:44:27 UTC
Permalink
Harry Thompson wrote:rat guards on the trees. But that would be quite a
Post by Harry Thompson
job, and success would not be guaranteed.
Finally, I concluded the heck with it. Let the squirrels have the pecans. I
can always buy them in the store.
Hap :-)
Andy writes:
You might try a 30 foot cable and a dog at the base
of the tree. Unless the dogs are really friendly to furry animals,
or terminally lazy, they will keep the squirrels away and not
eat the nuts....

Another wonderful Texas crop is cantalope. I had a patch this
spring and got dozens of them. I was giving them away as fast
as I could. Ripening on the vine makes them sweet as sugar.....

Andy in Eureka, Texas
jimstevens
2006-09-02 23:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry Thompson
Post by Florida
-snipped here but saved to a file-
Post by jimstevens
Picking pecans from trees in our yard and picking pecans, cotton and
whatever else on 'halves' was regular routine as well.
Your whole post is great. I think a lot of people would want to
read a longer description of what it's like to live a *real*
back-to-the-land, voluntary simplicity life.
Pecans - We need advice on pecans. We have a GIGANTIC pecan tree in
the back yard, not sure but I think I've already described it in this
n.g. Anyway, it's so big that the actually that pecan tree is the
critter that lives on this 1/2 acre and we get to use the space that's
left over. This tree makes very large crops of nuts. The neighbors
tell us to expect to rake up nuts in order to walk on grass in the back
yard. My question is, can you give us some tips on how to handle the
nuts, gather them, etc? Any handy hints for shelling them?
We were gone last fall and winter, so we didn't see the 2005 crop
last fall when it was new. When I got home in April the ground was
still littered with a couple of bushels of nuts. Grandkids and I
carefully gathered a bushel or so and stored them in the garden shed to
dry out for a week or two, the way we used to do up home with black
walnuts... and an army of squirrels came to take them away and/or plant
them in our herb garden, veg garden, potted plants, flower borders and
foundation plantings.
Post by jimstevens
Big garden with beans, peas, tomatos, cucumbers, and all the rest and
canning. Picking blackberries, elderberries, etc and making jams,
jellies and wine.
I grew up in a big industrial city, and the Old Dude on a dairy
farm. So he was appalled to learn the first summer we were married,
that what I really wanted to do was 1) go out to gather wild berries
and wild apples, 2) make jams and jellies, 3) have a veg garden, and 4)
plant roses & daylilies all arround the house we were renting.
Poor man, he had no idea that inside many a city slicker is someone
who wants to raise a garden - 3 tomato plants and a cucumber.
There are few things growing naturally in Texas that are good, and pecans is
one of them. They grow naturally in this hostile environment, and without
care. There are few things more delicious than a pecan. And the wood is a
great hardwood if you are into furniture making. A funny purple though.
I have a small pecan in my backyard that I planted myself 20 years ago. I
wait until the nuts fall by themselves to gather them. Unfortunately the
squirrels beat me to them. My wife and I debated what to do about the
squirrels. I objected to killing them because 1st I like small furry
creatures, and 2nd other squirrels would move in to replace them.
Pussy! That tree is to attract squirrels and the squirrels are for
eating.
Indoarsman
2006-08-31 20:38:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimstevens
Onced and twiced are words.
That's pretty fancy language. I learned it as oncet and twicet.

Speaking of little critters, I was talking to someone in San Antonio
one day when he felt something wet on the back of his leg just above
his boot. It was just scorpion venom, so we went on talking. He had
stepped back onto a scorpion, and the scorpion had struck the back of
his boot.

Indoarsman
AndyS
2006-08-31 21:13:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Indoarsman
That's pretty fancy language. I learned it as oncet and twicet.
Speaking of little critters, I was talking to someone in San Antonio
one day when he felt something wet on the back of his leg just above
his boot. It was just scorpion venom, so we went on talking. He had
stepped back onto a scorpion, and the scorpion had struck the back of
his boot.
Indoarsman
Andy writes:
Scorpions aka Texas lobster........

Irritating little buggers --- one crawled into my pajama bottoms
once before I put them on. Sting was like a bee sting.,....
I'm glad it was only a small one.......

We have them all around. You get used to them, and kill
them whenever you can, and ALWAYS wear slippers at nite
when you get up to go pee....

Andy in Eureka, Texas
Indoarsman
2006-09-02 14:38:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by AndyS
We have them all around. You get used to them, and kill
them whenever you can, and ALWAYS wear slippers at nite
when you get up to go pee....
What??? You don't sleep in your boots????

Indoarsman
Harry Thompson
2006-09-02 17:35:02 UTC
Permalink
AndyS wrote: (about scorpions)
Post by AndyS
We have them all around. You get used to them, and kill
them whenever you can, and ALWAYS wear slippers at nite
when you get up to go pee....
When we first moved in our house it was a new development. There were
scorpions all over, disturbed by the building.

Our carpet was a slate gray, almost blue. Every now and then I'd see
something on the carpet that looked like a dirty rubber band. You did not
want to give in to the urge to stoop over and pick them up. Those were
scorpions. It wasn't so much that they were invading the house, but that the
house had invaded their former territory.

Scorpions on the carpet are hard to kill. They have a tough shell that
doesn't crush easily, and if you smashed one on a thick carpet, they only
recoiled high in the air unharmed and could well come down on you. You have
to slowly grind them into the carpet with the heel of your shoe. I also
tried a French butcher's knife, slicing them. The stinger vibrates so fast
you can barely make it out.

One night I woke up for no reason that I could give you, and turned on the
light. There, directly over my head, was one of the largest scorpions I ever
saw walking upside down on the ceiling. They do that. The problem is, their
grip isn't that good, and they can fall off into your bedding.

I eased my way out of bed, picked up my shoe to use as a hammer, aimed ever
so carefully at the bastard, and nailed him. It left a brown stain on the
ceiling that I couldn't get off. It had to be painted.

One did crawl into the bedding, which they like by the way, and got my wife.
It was awful.

Eventually, the neighborhood built up enough to drive them off.

Hap
Florida
2006-09-02 23:09:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry Thompson
AndyS wrote: (about scorpions)
Post by AndyS
We have them all around. You get used to them, and kill
them whenever you can, and ALWAYS wear slippers at nite
when you get up to go pee....
-snip-
Post by Harry Thompson
Scorpions on the carpet are hard to kill. They have a tough shell that
doesn't crush easily, and if you smashed one on a thick carpet, they only
recoiled high in the air unharmed and could well come down on you. You have
to slowly grind them into the carpet with the heel of your shoe. I also
tried a French butcher's knife, slicing them. The stinger vibrates so fast
you can barely make it out.
One night I woke up for no reason that I could give you, and turned on the
light. There, directly over my head, was one of the largest scorpions I ever
saw walking upside down on the ceiling. They do that. The problem is, their
grip isn't that good, and they can fall off into your bedding.
Conversation certainly adds to one's picture of the world, doesn't
it. Your description of the scorpions just gave me a sudden attitude
adjustment, and now I can't believe that a few minutes ago I was
muttering to myself because there were fluffy little grey squirrels
scampering on the roof.

-snip-
William Boyd
2006-09-02 23:34:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry Thompson
AndyS wrote: (about scorpions)
Post by AndyS
We have them all around. You get used to them, and kill
them whenever you can, and ALWAYS wear slippers at nite
when you get up to go pee....
When we first moved in our house it was a new development. There were
scorpions all over, disturbed by the building.
Our carpet was a slate gray, almost blue. Every now and then I'd see
something on the carpet that looked like a dirty rubber band. You did not
want to give in to the urge to stoop over and pick them up. Those were
scorpions. It wasn't so much that they were invading the house, but that the
house had invaded their former territory.
Scorpions on the carpet are hard to kill. They have a tough shell that
doesn't crush easily, and if you smashed one on a thick carpet, they only
recoiled high in the air unharmed and could well come down on you. You have
to slowly grind them into the carpet with the heel of your shoe. I also
tried a French butcher's knife, slicing them. The stinger vibrates so fast
you can barely make it out.
One night I woke up for no reason that I could give you, and turned on the
light. There, directly over my head, was one of the largest scorpions I ever
saw walking upside down on the ceiling. They do that. The problem is, their
grip isn't that good, and they can fall off into your bedding.
I eased my way out of bed, picked up my shoe to use as a hammer, aimed ever
so carefully at the bastard, and nailed him. It left a brown stain on the
ceiling that I couldn't get off. It had to be painted.
One did crawl into the bedding, which they like by the way, and got my wife.
It was awful.
Eventually, the neighborhood built up enough to drive them off.
Hap
Texas is not the only place that I have encountered scorpions. Here is
one in Thailand that sure got my attention.

http://www.1stmob.com/op349.htm?

BILL P.
Indoarsman
2006-09-03 13:22:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry Thompson
When we first moved in our house it was a new development. There were
scorpions all over, disturbed by the building.
How are the tarantulas? Most of the ones I've encountered out here in
Californium are on the small side. One summer I found a deceased
tarantula next to the cat box, so you can imagine how puny it was. But
during a Sunday drive in the countryside south of San Jose I was
driving slowly on a narrow road when I saw a big tarantula starting to
cross the road, so I stopped to look at it. My wife panicked when she
saw it, and the couple in the back seat seemed more than a little bit
edgy. I guess they figured it would engulf the VW bug we were in, so I
drove on off. Regretfully, of course.

Indoarsman
Harry Thompson
2006-09-03 15:46:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Indoarsman
Post by Harry Thompson
When we first moved in our house it was a new development. There were
scorpions all over, disturbed by the building.
How are the tarantulas? Most of the ones I've encountered out here in
Californium are on the small side. One summer I found a deceased
tarantula next to the cat box, so you can imagine how puny it was. But
during a Sunday drive in the countryside south of San Jose I was
driving slowly on a narrow road when I saw a big tarantula starting to
cross the road, so I stopped to look at it. My wife panicked when she
saw it, and the couple in the back seat seemed more than a little bit
edgy. I guess they figured it would engulf the VW bug we were in, so I
drove on off. Regretfully, of course.
Indoarsman
I haven't seen any tarantulas around here.
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